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WVHillbilly520H

Be careful removing storm damage

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@ebinmaine, @PeacemakerJack @dells68, @shallowwatersailor, @elcamino/wheelhorse and the rest of RS, Since I'm off for the holidays I was trying to get a bunch of things caught up around the house like removing the broken and damaged trees from the ice storm here last month. Anyways today after a pretty uneventful past few days I had a "small" mishap sawing a 8-10" diameter "leaning" wild cherry tree had notched it with the lean go around to finish felling it as I was cut it decides to split before I was half through with that final cut, I started to back out when I seen what was happening but those damn wild grape vines ivy and creeper caught my heel and arm as the tree split and caught me striking me in the left side of head and shoulder, then pinning my right ankle to where I could not move, dummy me called my wife instead of 911 where she called them , then her parents and brother, my in-laws showed up before the squad did, FIL just had a partial lung removed last month so he was still healing but BIL lifted it off my ankle as the squad arrived, they checked my vitals other than elevated BP I was declared ok, I am sore especially my left shoulder and noggin with a few scratches and scrapes I feel ok for now, SO REMEMBER BE CAREFUL WHEN CUTTING TREES whether damaged or otherwise, Jeff. (Here's the picture I took while waiting to be rescued)

IMAG5551.jpg

Edited by WVHillbilly520H
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5 minutes ago, elcamino/wheelhorse said:

So you almost get killed and you had to take a selfie. What a man! Rest until he have to go back to work.

I suppose you can state that way, wife wasn't to impressed though.

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Every time I have had a “problem” while cutting wood (except once) has been tripping over junk/brush/ limbs.  Resulted in nicking my leg with the saw, fortunately never drew blood. I clean up religiously now. The other time was storm damage limb and it got me even though I knew it was trouble. 

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It is scary how fast that can happen Jeff.  I’m so glad that you weren’t hurt any worse.  

 

I love the fact that you had the presence of mind to take a pic.  That’s one for posterity.  

 

Uneven footing will catch us off guard way too fast. 20 years ago, I was walking floor joists when one collapsed under me and sent me plummeting head first 10’ down into a concrete basement. I’m thankful that my guardian angel was working overtime or that could’ve been the end of the line for me. 

 

Keep us posted on the healing process. I’m guessing you will be a bit sore tomorrow with maybe some colorful bruising as well...I’ll be praying for a speedy recovery!

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Gonna try to go to my primary care Doctor tomorrow and see what he says maybe go get a few bone pictures taken just to be on the safe side.

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Really thankful you had your phone to call for help.    Sure beats sawing the log off your foot or sawing the foot off.  

Seriously Jeff,  glad it wasn't any worse.    Thanks for reminding us all how quickly things can go South when operating a chain saw.

Oh, and thanks for remembering   :wwp:.      Heal quickly brother.

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17 minutes ago, Ed Kennell said:

Really thankful you had your phone to call for help.    Sure beats sawing the log off your foot or sawing the foot off.  

Seriously Jeff,  glad it wasn't any worse.    Thanks for reminding us all how quickly things can go South when operating a chain saw.

Oh, and thanks for remembering   :wwp:.      Heal quickly brother.

Those tools/machines have NO feelings, and we must RESPECT them no matter how many times you have done the same thing time after time. 

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Jeff I just read this post and showed it to Trina.

She says I should tell you that you are not supposed to put trees on your legs.

Having tried something similar but with only my foot, I can actually vouch that what she says is correct.

That was pretty much a near-identical situation to what you were just in. I thought I was prepared and then the tree showed me that that was not true.

 

I'm sure you're well aware having seen my videos and pictures I'm not exactly what you would call the smallest fellow in the world. I am also not particularly graced with balance or a great body control. I say that kind of tongue-in-cheek but facts are facts.

Because of this, I've learned that when I'm going to take down a tree I need to clear a path all the way around said tree about four feet out. Sometimes more.

 

 

Good to see that there are no body fluids leaking out of you.

Hopefully you will not find any cracks in the x-rays.

 

Glad to know you're doing pretty much mostly okay.

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:angry-screaming: what a scary thing. Hope no cracks. Get well soon. Glad to hear your not hurt any worse than what it looks.

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Ooh! I hope you are okay. Reminds me of when I broke my ankle. Mrs. Sailor's response was very similar too. And yes, I called her in downtown DC instead of calling the ambulance.

 

I'll drop this off before you decide to have some more fun. You need it more than me now. By the way, I hope the Dolmar didn't get damaged.  :)

 

2077841861_12271818001.jpg.be8b7a141697a4f0132c8f3288991e63.jpg

Edited by shallowwatersailor
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10 minutes ago, shallowwatersailor said:

Ooh! I hope you are okay. Reminds me of when I broke my ankle. Mrs. Sailor's response was very similar too. And yes, I called her in downtown DC instead of calling the ambulance.

 

I'll drop this off before you decide to have some more fun. You need it more than me now. By the way, I hope the Dolmar didn't get damaged.  :)

 

2077841861_12271818001.jpg.be8b7a141697a4f0132c8f3288991e63.jpg

Thank you John, I probably won't fell anymore for a few days/weeks/months, any the saw came out of it better than me :eusa-think:. I'm sure after I heal up a bit I will need to block the rest of those trees up.

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Rule number 1 (there’s probably a few #1 rules in logging... but always have a clear and planned escape route.  I’m glad you’re here with us to talk about it.  Get well soon!

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7 minutes ago, pullstart said:

Rule number 1 (there’s probably a few #1 rules in logging... but always have a clear and planned escape route.  I’m glad you’re here with us to talk about it.  Get well soon!

:text-yeahthat:

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I was so proud of my dad when I fell a big alder across the hood of my 69 GMC when he never said a word.

 

At one time my father was one of two fellers in British Colombia recognized by the insurance companies that were permitted to remove dangerous trees and snags in residential areas.

 

Danny Sailor a close neighbor was second.

 

A bit of trivia not noted below is that before making that hasty climb up the pole Danny would drink half a quart of liquid honey

 

Danny Sailor became the World Champion Logger in 1962, wearing Dayton Boots. Sailor’s act consisted of racing up a 100 foot high fir tree, doing handstands, headstands, and sometimes the Charleston, without the benefit of a safety net.

“I put a 12-pound weight on each foot when I’m practicing,” explained Sailor, “and when I take them off I feel like I’m flying”.

Like so many Dayton wearers, Sailor was unconventional. A prairie boy who came west to British Columbia, Danny:

  • was a strict vegetarian
  • had a soft spot for the Dukabours – once allowing 1,300 of them to camp on his Surrey farm - while delivering them 500 loaves of bread
  • stayed up a pole for 28 days in 1959 to help raise money for the poor
  • was fined $25 for a missing mudguard on his truck. He was broke, so he agreed to spend five days in Oakalla Prison. Word of his imprisonment leaked out - and the fine was quickly paid by an anonymous fan.

By 1968, Sailor was making $30,000 a year, touring U.S. cities with his highflying act. His winning footwear became a source of much curiosity and the Dayton Boot Company began receiving orders from U.S. loggers. Sailor won a total of 35 logging trophies, wearing Dayton Boots. In his signature move, he would climb to the top of a 120-foot pole, do a jig, throw his tin hat in the air – and then beat it in a race to the ground.

 

Danny Sailor, a Dayton original.

 

sailor.png

 

 

Edited by bcgold
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Glad you weren't seriously injured & hope there's no hidden damage. I've had my share of close calls while cutting wood, truly scary stuff. Hopefully your up & going shortly.

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35 minutes ago, pullstart said:

Rule number 1 (there’s probably a few #1 rules in logging... but always have a clear and planned escape route.  I’m glad you’re here with us to talk about it.  Get well soon!

Rule #1 when working on the land is to make sure someone knows where you are, and how long you plan to be there, in case something like this happens. Phones fail.  

My aunt just told me about another farmer that flipped his H over moving rock and didn’t tell anyone where he was or what he was doing. Laid there for hours before someone found him. 

Glad you weren’t seriously hurt @WVHillbilly520H , could’ve gone a whole other direction. 

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Jeff, glad you are OK.   :handgestures-thumbupright:    If you are attempting to win the  "Red Square Hard Hat Award" you are off to a good start.   :ychain:

 

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@953 nut, No really hadn't contemplated that one, but by all means nominate me, they say laughter is the best medicine, thank you.

Edited by WVHillbilly520H
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Glad to see you are OK. Could have been much worse. As bad as cell phones are, when you are working alone they are invaluable such as in such a situation. Get well soon.

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4 hours ago, Achto said:

Glad you weren't seriously injured & hope there's no hidden damage. I've had my share of close calls while cutting wood, truly scary stuff. Hopefully your up & going shortly.

 

I spent a few years in the 70s and 80s logging and working in a sawmill.   Both serious accidents I had occurred when tired (end of day), when I was taking shortcuts, and when I was in a hurry.   The combination of my errors cost me a hyperextended knee that still bothers me on a regular basis 35 years later.   The second injury was just a deep ragged gash when I was bucking a limb in thick brush, fell backwards and lost control of the saw.  The chain was spinning pretty good when brush bounced it back toward my face and over my left forearm.   A heavy flannel shirt and long John's kept it from cutting too deep as the chain slowed down.  

 

This isn't meant to steal the thunder from your thread, but to illustrate that there are usually many things in retrospect that we could have done differently to prevent most accidents.   Thinking through escape routes, clearing potential hazards and planning the falling and bucking cuts accordingly could have saved my butt on both occasions.  Both times I was cutting within earshot of another faller and he was able to help me.  No cell phones in those days. 

 

Good luck and Godspeed on a swift and full recovery.  

 

Cheers!

 

Dave

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24 minutes ago, Mows4three said:

 

I spent a few years in the 70s and 80s logging and working in a sawmill.   Both serious accidents I had occurred when tired (end of day), when I was taking shortcuts, and when I was in a hurry.   The combination of my errors cost me a hyperextended knee that still bothers me on a regular basis 35 years later.   The second injury was just a deep ragged gash when I was bucking a limb in thick brush, fell backwards and lost control of the saw.  The chain was spinning pretty good when brush bounced it back toward my face and over my left forearm.   A heavy flannel shirt and long John's kept it from cutting too deep as the chain slowed down.  

 

This isn't meant to steal the thunder from your thread, but to illustrate that there are usually many things in retrospect that we could have done differently to prevent most accidents.   Thinking through escape routes, clearing potential hazards and planning the falling and bucking cuts accordingly could have saved my butt on both occasions.  Both times I was cutting within earshot of another faller and he was able to help me.  No cell phones in those days. 

 

Good luck and Godspeed on a swift and full recovery.  

 

Cheers!

 

Dave

There's only so much you can say about starting rope and that has been answered long ago, let us old men with wandering minds enjoy the show.

 

Logging is perhaps the most dangerous occupation, my father spent forty years in the bush before an accident that pinned his leg between two large trees breaking both the tibia and fibula so badly the marrow went into the blood stream. He was in a coma for three months, he was a different man coming out of that coma,even though he was alive I had lost  the father I had before the accident.

 

He retired after that accident, they say that money is the root of all evil, don't believe it - alcohol is.

Edited by bcgold
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