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35 minutes ago, prondzy said:

The whole point if you read the very first post was to show the inside of YOUR garage. And to share your workspace how you have organized your benches, shelves storage ideas. @Terry M understood the idea. It isnt about what things would be nice its about how you are using your space (the inside).

  Well, Ok. The thing is, however is that i have and use all the stuff that I have described. I am just too busy with Christmas to take pictures of my own shop. Just be patient as I have other stuff to show

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@gt4  "Oh ya the pink balloon hanging up is how my son and his wife told us we're going to be Grandparents to a girl. Our first grandchild!"

 

Congratulations on the new Grandbaby!!!

 

Nice garage space too!

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I debated putting up pictures because it's not technically my shop it's where I work but I'm allowed to bring in my own projects and work on them at night and weekends as long as it doesn't prevent getting paying jobs in.  Right now its the weekend so my uncle has the red truck in working on it and you can just about make out my plow truck rebuild.  The shop is about 35x60 with 14' doors 12' wide on both ends.  If the place was empty other than the office we could fit 5 full size trucks inside with room for the tools and to work around them without being cramped. 

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Soooooo.....why can't we ask about what is on the shelves??   Mike...where is your Dad??  I think we need a "threads with rules attached" section.   :occasion-xmas:  This is way too complicated for tractor guys.  :text-lol:

 

Merry Christmas to all.  I'll take some picks after this weekend...things should thaw out enough to get the doors open.  :occasion-snowman:

Edited by stevasaurus
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5 hours ago, stevasaurus said:

Soooooo.....why can't we ask about what is on the shelves??   Mike...where is your Dad??  I think we need a "threads with rules attached" section.   :occasion-xmas:  This is way too complicated for tractor guys.  :text-lol:

 

Merry Christmas to all.  I'll take some picks after this weekend...things should thaw out enough to get the doors open.  :occasion-snowman:

:text-yeahthat::wacko:

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Holy smokes Ranger...I could eat off that floor!

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This is the view of my heated area when I just want to use a smallish electric heater [4kilowatt and that is plenty] Just a tarp for sidewalls and a simple corner frame with air barrier. The doors are free metal sliding doors with a pin at the top and base in the manner of saloon doors. The bonus of frameless corner mounting is a 48" opening when fully open and they swing in or out. This is a previous picture before the b series was moved in and it is in pieces on a folding table. I figure that i can prime the pieces a few at a time and then let the stored heat carry them through to a soft cure. Then add the heat to 60 degrees for a full cure.  At least I can get everything done except the finish paint on the tins.

 

 There is a 150K oil furnace in the shop that is seldom used. Not shown are the swing blocks on the top pins of the doors that allow for a perfect fit

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Edited by ohiofarmer
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Here is the Harbor Freight high position motorcycle lift that I highly recommend. I used it on a heavily rusted Horse to lift it and then break loose the fasteners from beneath the machine. Not great for lifting with the deck attached, but a best buy for working on a bare tractor.

 

 Also shown is one of the lumber carts with the garage queen 400-8 . 242 hours and original paint. The lumber cart weighs in a 300 pounds and will move one ton of weight as easy as you please.

 

 I probably should quit so as not to monopolize this thread.

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5 hours ago, Ranger13148 said:

This my workshop

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.

 

 

Ranger--what does it look like now that you have moved in?

:ychain: :ROTF:

nice use of a kitchen full of cabinets--sweet!:handgestures-thumbupright:

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2 vehicles parked in there for the winter, cabinets stuffed full of goodies. I'll have to post some pictures of the Wheel Horse shed that's pretty much full of tractors and other snow removal equipment. Its almost time for another expansion :teasing-neener:

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 You guys have some amazing shops. Some of them are so neat and organized that i would expect to hear classical music playing, Others are working class and heavy-duty industrial with maybe some country music.

 

 And then there is mine with "Helter Skelter" playing in a steady loop. It doesn't a;ways look this bad. Sometimes it is even worse and maybe time for a new year's resolution. Oh ,well.

 

 

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Wow guys, these pics are making me jealous. Really getting some good ideas, keep them coming. @ohiofarmer that's a different lift, i never saw one used on a tractor it looks pretty handy!

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I wish I could say that I have my shop finished and the way that I want it to be.  I wish I could say that it was organized with a place for everything and everything in its place.  I wish I could show you a finished shop that is totally organized and awesome. BUT--I'll show you what I have and some of the things that I've learned...

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the building is conventionally framed 2x6 construction.  It is a 36'x30' two story building. The large overhead door is where I store the hot rods. The little overhead door houses my business storage.

 

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The overhead door to the back is my shop access and the former above houses my "reloading" room.

 

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This is looking into the Hot Rod storage from the shop area.  My Goat is on the left and my cousin's Bandit on the right.  He is serving our country in the sandbox right now so I'm taking care of his rig until he gets back.  Normally, the spot where the bandit is contains 6 of my tractors.  I have a double opening French door that will be installed between the two and allow me to move the tractors from storage to the shop and back without going outside.

 

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The shop will be insulated this next summer and I will install drywall on the ceiling and OSB on the walls backwards so that it all can be painted white. Two things I want to mention from this pic: the I beam on the ceiling with the trolley and the big shop lights.  I can't overemphasize the importance of having ample light whether fluorescent or LED.  The trolley is amazing.  You could put an electric lift on it or a chain hoist. I use a come along for now but will put something different on it eventually.  It works really well to lift the heavy parts from a GT--especially the engine.

 

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Here's my storage solution for now.  If you make them just wide enough like I did you can store tractors underneath. Normally I have three under there.  The missing ones are in their snow clothes right now.  (Sorry guys for all the Cubs but they are my other GT passion.  My horses have their work clothes on in my main garage.) someday I might just put doors on this homemade shelving to cover up the mess.

 

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This is the overhead door facing the back or north of the building.  It works very well for natural light when warm enough to leave open during the day.   The tractors can be moved in and out with ease. I can clear the tractors out and bring a car in when needed to work on it. That space is 30'x14'. The other interesting thing I want you to note is the 14gallon fuel can with hose and spigot. That is located on a shelf on the wall by the door. It is gravity feed and so that is why it is up so high.  The wife and kids find it handy to fill up the tractors in a clean and easy fashion.  Heating will be a house furnace with traditional ducting supply's and returns.  I haven't covered the second story which has really nothing to do with GT's and I don't want to get yelled at for being off topic...:occasion-santa:

 

Thanks for this thread @prondzy

ive gained a lot of ideas myself.  I'll stay tuned in for sure...

 

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On ‎12‎/‎25‎/‎2016 at 4:24 PM, PeacemakerJack said:

My Goat is on the left

would love to see a picture of that, maybe in another thread:icecream:

On ‎12‎/‎25‎/‎2016 at 10:59 AM, ohiofarmer said:

Here is the Harbor Freight high position motorcycle lift that I highly recommend

I'm thinking hard on this one, lotsa great uses in my shop, I'll get some pics of my shop tomorrow.

 

Here's pics of my messy shop, This is my Christmas week off so I usually pull a lot of stuff out and do some rearranging. Pictures include my tractor table ( with soon to be 1654 8speed), Motor and transmission building station,blast cabinet, parts washer and parts and engine storage, my newly acquired Atlas lathe, drill press and more part storage, more shelving full of engines and transmissions. And after seeing the high lift motorcycle lift that @ohiofarmer has, sent me out tonight to pick one up. Thanks I see many possibilities with this newly acquired tool. 

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Edited by Shynon
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I got a heating plan in mind already Jack!......may be some ac too!:)

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:text-yeahthat::woohoo:

i can't wait to hear it Jim.  You are invited to anytime swing on over and check it out. To stay on the Topic, this heating system will be most functional for keeping a building of this size and design heated appropriately.

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So, it seems I'm not the only one who likes to peer into other peoples garages...

Just in case there is anyone who is unaware, here is a link to The Garage Journal.

Lots of pics and ideas... ;)

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:rolleyes:  Like that garage link...

lots of good stuff there.  :handgestures-thumbsup:

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