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ebinmaine

Coffee grounds drying station

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ebinmaine

The Lead Gardener In Charge and I have decided to put more effort into producing our own food every year for the past 4 or 5. 

This year we've had a piece of ground leveled out in prep for a permanent plot. 

 

We're also saving all of our coffee grounds and will be using them as appropriate for whatever needs come up.  

 

We created a drying station to eliminate mold. 

One pan dries while the other is being filled. 

Both get stirred/dug/flipped several times a day. 

 

 

IMG_20220107_040837379_HDR.jpg

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ebinmaine
7 minutes ago, EB-80/8inPA said:

Now, @ebinmaine, I don’t think I’m alone here wanting to see, instead, some rotating drying barrel composting contraption run off a drive belt wrapped around the rear tire of a Wheelhorse.

I like this idea...

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squonk

You can connect it to Colossus! 

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Sodaking27

Yeah I was thinking it was going to be a new attachment for the WH.:music-rockout:

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SylvanLakeWH

Curious - Why not just compost them? Or, worm bins…?

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ebinmaine
44 minutes ago, RJ Hamner said:

site

Good info there Bob. Thanks!

 

21 minutes ago, Sodaking27 said:

Yeah I was thinking it was going to be a new attachment for the WH.:music-rockout:

 

If @EB-80/8inPA and @squonk get there way it might be!

 

11 minutes ago, SylvanLakeWH said:

Curious - Why not just compost them? Or, worm bins…?

 

We don't compost on purpose. 

Around here a compost pile attracts animals we don't want around the dog. Skunks. Porcupines. Coyote. 

 

The worms in the garden area will certainly benefit from these grounds. 

One of the reasons we're saving them.... Worm food. 

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Alex175
2 minutes ago, ebinmaine said:

Worm food.

That's how you get them working overtime, caffeinate them.

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Jeff-C175
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, ebinmaine said:

coffee grounds

 

I've long had a sneaking suspicion that the use of coffee grounds as a soil amendment may in fact be ... ummm ... bull5h1t .  But then, bull5h1t probably IS a good thing to add, AFTER composting.

 

Anyhow, I googled around a bit and found this:

 

https://thegardenshednursery.com.au/resources/the-science-behind-coffee-grounds

 

Quote

In the greenhouse trial, all plants grown in coffee-amended soil treatments showed poor growth compared to the control and fertiliser-amended soil treatments.

 

and another:  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315663227_Using_coffee_grounds_in_gardens_and_landscapes_WSU_Extension_Fact_Sheet_FS207E

 

Worth reading, may dispel some of the myth though.

 

Edited by Jeff-C175
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Jeff-C175
4 minutes ago, ebinmaine said:

The worms in the garden area will certainly benefit from these grounds. 

 

Think the caffeine will make them dig faster and poop more?

 

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ebinmaine
4 minutes ago, Jeff-C175 said:

some of the myth

I did some poking around on the interwebs a few weeks ago. 

Seems like it's another thing that depends on local circumstances like existing soil and what plants are to be grown. 

 

Trina's experience has shown her that it does clearly help with our situation. Why??

I haven't the foggiest. 

 

One thing does seem to be a point. Don't use too much. 

 

 

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Snoopy11
11 minutes ago, ebinmaine said:

dog. Skunks. Porcupines. Coyote

Ehem... throat clearing... bears... :P

 

:laughing-rolling:

 

Don

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EB-80/8inPA
11 minutes ago, ebinmaine said:

 

Around here a compost pile attracts animals we don't want around the dog. Skunks. Porcupines. Coyote

There’s gotta be an implement for that as well.  The rotating drum of composting death.  It just throws the dispatched carcass in with the grounds.  Colossus, it must be!  That tractor oughta be ready by the time the attachments are, lol.

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Jeff-C175
Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Snoopy11 said:

bears...

 

And Caffeinated ones to boot!

 

image.png.23be21f0d157007169398caaa186b89f.png

 

image.png.cc2f1a27edcce47e42572d0d48ab114b.png

 

Edited by Jeff-C175
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Snoopy11

You... read my mind... @Jeff-C175...

 

:laughing-rolling::confusion-helpsos::laughing-rolling:

 

Don

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Snoopy11
18 minutes ago, Jeff-C175 said:

 

Think the caffeine will make them dig faster and poop more?

 

Well, if the caffeine doesn't... just mix in some super beets powder...

 

Dat'll do it... :laughing-rolling:

 

Don

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ebinmaine
13 minutes ago, Jeff-C175 said:

 

 

image.png.cc2f1a27edcce47e42572d0d48ab114b.png

 

 

 

This one. 

Is. Me.   

 

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Snoopy11

Slightly in need of coffee Minion | Coffee

This one.

Is. Me.

 

Don

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SylvanLakeWH

I long ago stopped “composting” with bins / piles… same reason - critters… but, I sheet compost all the time with leaves - just mow them into the grass and just blow them into planting areas to decompose… I’d suggest same with coffee grounds - just toss on the ground and turn into the soil…

 

:twocents-twocents:

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8ntruck
3 hours ago, EB-80/8inPA said:

Now, @ebinmaine, I don’t think I’m alone here wanting to see, instead, some rotating drying barrel composting contraption run off a drive belt wrapped around the rear tire of a Wheelhorse.

I see a rotating basket on the mid-mount, powered by the PTO, with drying augmented by ducting from the exit side of the engine tins blowing through the basket.......

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jabelman

First thing you need to do is check the ph of your garden soil, the coffee grounds are acidic. Check to see what pH  needs are depending on what your growing

We save them here because of the low pH soil and use them on the blueberry bushes, I actually add vinegar to the water too.

Sorry I think your wasting time drying them.  

I don't dry them they just go into a bucket with a lid with the mold too

 

 

 

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Jeff-C175
34 minutes ago, jabelman said:

coffee grounds are acidic

 

Research doesn't bear this out...

 

image.png.ffde24a59829d367e34cd25c5f875889.png

 

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jabelman
44 minutes ago, Jeff-C175 said:

 

Research doesn't bear this out...

 

image.png.ffde24a59829d367e34cd25c5f875889.png

 

The plants that like coffee grounds include roses, blueberries, azaleas, carrots, radishes, rhododendrons, hydrangeas, cabbage, lilies, and hollies. These are all acid-loving plants that grow best in acidic soil. You'll want to avoid using coffee grounds on plants like tomatoes, clovers, and alfalfa.

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Snoopy11

Well, since we are copying and pasting from Google about topics... that none of use are experts on... I will join in... :P

 

Coffee grounds do contain residual caffeine, and this caffeine inhibits both seedlings and mature plants from growing as they should. If you have young plants in particular or have just put in seeds, it’s best to not have coffee grounds anywhere near these. Coffee can destroy the roots of new plants, which leads to their demise even before they’re able to grow much.

 

Don

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