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JAinVA

Old man and the tree

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JAinVA
Posted (edited)

Yesterday was a busy day here.Set this tree on the ground in the morning and picked ,processed and canned beans in the afternoon.This tree will be processed for firewood.The saw on the stump is a Stihl MS360 with a 25" bar.The saw 45' away is an MS360 with a twenty inch bar.

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Edited by JAinVA
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ZXT

Looks like a days work right there! I've always had good luck with Stihl products. I have a few of their chainsaws that I picked up from my local scrap yard for $2 a piece because people chunk them instead of cleaning the carb.

 

Pardon my ignorance, but what kind of tree is that?

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857 horse

JIM.............LOVE THAT CUP HOLDER,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

 

:music-rockon:

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JAinVA

I figure 2 cords.The tree is a Tulip Poplar,a fast growing hardwood.That tree is probably only 60 years old.Both of the saws were blown up when I got them off E-bay cheap.

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The Tool Crib

I just ordered two ripping chains yesterday 

I Got some walnut logs to cut lengthwise 

for bowl blanks. 

903BFEE0-E29C-4D18-B786-A4562C84E5F2.jpeg

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ebinmaine
9 minutes ago, The Tool Crib said:

I just ordered two ripping chains yesterday 

I Got some walnut logs to cut lengthwise 

for bowl blanks. 

903BFEE0-E29C-4D18-B786-A4562C84E5F2.jpeg

Randy make sure you share some pictures when you do that

 

 

 

2 hours ago, JAinVA said:

Yesterday was a busy day here.

Ya done good man.

 

 

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The Tool Crib

This one is not done yet I turn them halfway take them off the lathe  and let him sit a while to dry and then finish them later. 

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Ed Kennell

Old Man and the Tree

 

I see the tree Jim.......where's this Old Man you speak of ?   :confusion-confused:

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Stormin
2 hours ago, 857 horse said:

JIM.............LOVE THAT CUP HOLDER,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

 

:music-rockon:

 

  Won't be much left to drink though. :thumbs:

 

  Wish I could lay my hands on a tree or two like that.

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elcamino/wheelhorse

@JAinVA You may be a little tired by the time you make the tree into firewood.

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JAinVA

Stormin,

      Probably 30 that size here.I have one that is 36" in diameter,2 feet up.Ed,I lost so much weight wrestling with the saws that I have become invisible

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Tractorhead

Everything i had in my mind will be, 

hopefully the fallen Tree doesn‘t hit my Horse and even destroy my Mug...

 

Otherwise that will be my worsest Day ever.

 

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Stormin
1 hour ago, JAinVA said:

Stormin,

      Probably 30 that size here.I have one that is 36" in diameter,2 feet up.

 

I'd settle two, Jim. :(

 

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ebinmaine
52 minutes ago, Stormin said:

 

I'd settle two, Jim. :(

 

Norm I got a forest full of various hardwoods but the shipping might be prohibitive to Europe

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Yossarian
5 hours ago, JAinVA said:

I figure 2 cords.The tree is a Tulip Poplar,a fast growing hardwood.That tree is probably only 60 years old.Both of the saws were blown up when I got them off E-bay cheap.

 

I'll burn just about anything but I haven't been real impressed with poplar.  About the only thing it has going for it is its light weight.

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ebinmaine
4 minutes ago, Yossarian said:

 

I'll burn just about anything but I haven't been real impressed with poplar.  About the only thing it has going for it is its light weight.

There are different densities n weights of poplar around the country. I don't know about that tulip poplar. Up here in Maine we have white poplar which looks almost exactly like a white birch when they're young except that the bark doesn't peel off like a paper birch.

When they are a little older the bottom half of the tree turns gray.

We also have gray poplar which should be pretty much self-explanatory.

 

Trina and I have tried to process and burn both gray and white poplar and I agree with the above statement. It's very close to useless in a fire except possibly as starting kindling.

It's nice because it doesn't weigh very much but it also does not have but about half the btu of beech trees which is what most of our forest is in most of what we burn.

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Stormin
33 minutes ago, ebinmaine said:

Norm I got a forest full of various hardwoods but the shipping might be prohibitive to Europe

 

I think you lot are trying to upset me. :unsure:

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JAinVA

You are not going to get the same heat density with Tulip Poplar as with Oak,Hickory or Beech.It burns fast and we use it during the day as there is someone here to constantly feed the stoveThat allows us to stretch out the high value hardwoods during heating season.

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JAinVA
Posted (edited)

Relative heat density for the following hardwoods goes as follows,in btus/cord.Red Oak 21.8,Beech 21.7,Soft Maple 19.1 and Yellow Poplar at 16.1 .By burning

Poplar during the warmer daytime it keeps the stove and stack temperatures up.

Edited by JAinVA

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ebinmaine
1 minute ago, JAinVA said:

Relative heat density for the following hardwoods goes as follows,in btus/cord.Red Oak 21.8,Beech 21.7,Soft Maple 19.1 and Yellow Poplar at 16.1.

Does your chart show white poplar or, some may call it Aspen?

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JAinVA

Aspen is listed at 14.7 btus/cord.

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ebinmaine
Just now, JAinVA said:

Aspen is listed at 14.7 btus/cord.

I think that's about where the white poplar is. To be honest it seems even lower.

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jabelman

nothing wrong with burning tulip poplar, my parents have heated their home for last 40 years using it, we have about 10 acres of it.  cuts easy, splits easy.  

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JAinVA

You say you have Beech,a slow growing tree.How many years will your wood supply last at current consumption rate?Dad lived in Maine many winters and he would use 8 cords a year on average.

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ebinmaine
1 minute ago, jabelman said:

nothing wrong with burning tulip poplar, cuts easy, splits easy.  

Definitely true. Easy to handle. Just does not put out the heat.

 

 

 

1 minute ago, JAinVA said:

You say you have Beech,a slow growing tree.How many years will your wood supply last at current consumption rate?Dad lived in Maine many winters and he would use 8 cords a year on average.

We've been burning between one and a half and two cords per year. We want to start burning a little bit more but probably won't be able to burn more than three. Just no time to keep up with the fires.

 

We have between 11 and 12 acres. with all the paths that we've been making we can access at least eight.

Beech coverage percentage is a little over 70%.

Many Maine forests are very very thick and this one certainly is. This area has not been logged for forty years or more.

Maine Forest ranger walked the land with us and gave us some clues about how to harvest for our own usage.

We could harvest at least 5 to 8 cord per year for at least the next decade, possibly more.

The Forest Ranger figured a properly growing forest should yield one cord per year, indefinitely. Mixed species of course.

 

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