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Todd--that lift is super cool.  Looks like a real back saver.  One of those WILL be in my shop someday!  

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I found this lift at HGR Surplus in Cleveland. It is a beast and has an honest lift rating of 2000 pounds.The lift in the video is pretty much what I have, except that the table size is 30"x96" They are rare in this table size, but you just have to keep checking inventory. The lift was horribly abused in that one of the base lift wheels went bad and then it wore an egg shaped hole in the pivot shaft at the X I had a part made for a farmer type [ugly, but effective] repair and restored the x-shaft and then added grease fittings. It lifts to 42" and I use it as a lift on the concrete floor and as a lift to move heavy stuff in and out of the shop. You can put a bike on it and stand on the lift with the bike and jump and the beast does not even wiggle. I got the thing for a bargain price but put a  lot of time into it. New units like this one go for 3500.00 and up. If you look at the cylinder, that says it all. So anyway, i chose to post a video from the manufacturer to show just what a little luck and some sweat equity can produce--push a button and up she goes. I am in there for about 500.00 plus my work, but that is a whole other story. Anyway, my wood floor in the shop is thirty inches above the concrete service portion , and that is how the Horses and motorcycles get to the resto area and back

http://www.southworthproducts.com/en/products/lift-tables/backsaver-lift-tables

 

 Look at the pricing on the video link and you can see my time was well spent. This machine will last three lifetimes the way it is built, Mine came without a power unit so I use the same unit that Harbor freight uses on their car lift

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I think this thread should be renamed "Garage Voyeurs".

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Edited by ztnoo
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Nice Norm...neatly cluttered!

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I like your garage, stormin'  Tell us a little about the lift on wheels.  i also enjoyed when Clint Eastwood held forth in his Gran Torinoi garage

 

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3 hours ago, ohiofarmer said:

I like your garage, stormin'  Tell us a little about the lift on wheels. 

 

Took me 50 odd years to get a workshop like that. Still not big enough. :rolleyes:

 

The lift is an old hospital bed. One of the best things I've got for free.

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Amazing the stuff one just kinda hangs on a nail in the wall once the pegboard gets filled!

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On 12/29/2016 at 9:13 AM, Lane Ranger said:

Looking at all these Garages/Shops and organization ideas made me think how I use to be able to walk around in my two car garage with small rear shop and workbench area BEFORE i had NINE Wheel Horses and several attachments,  and sundry parts, motors, manuals, etc.   

 

Back in 2010/2011 , I could see , find and get to things quicker and without injury , bumps or bruises!

 

Lol! I know but if you went even bigger this addiction gets even stronger!

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......... uuuhh........................

 

1 hour ago, Lane Ranger said:

BEFORE i had NINE Wheel Horses and several attachments,  and sundry parts, motors, manuals, etc.   

 

.....................and whose fault might that be???

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Edited by ztnoo
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Here's a few photos of my sheds, the first has 9 tractors, dump cart, 4 wheel trolley and a few other bits.

the work shed has a small lathe, pillar drill and hydraulic tractor lift and a few bibs and bobs.

the garage is home to the sawbench 2 more tractors and the Harley.

theres 5 horse's outside and 3 or 4 in a shed down the drive.

i work on the principle, the less space i have the easier it is to keep warm

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Found a couple of the sheds down the drive, i told the wife they were for wood storage but i sneeked a few parts in them.

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On 12/29/2016 at 9:13 AM, Lane Ranger said:

Looking at all these Garages/Shops and organization ideas made me think how I use to be able to walk around in my two car garage with small rear shop and workbench area BEFORE i had NINE Wheel Horses and several attachments,  and sundry parts, motors, manuals, etc.   

 

Back in 2010/2011 , I could see , find and get to things quicker and without injury , bumps or bruises!

 

It looks like you still have plenty of room to add more red stuff.:handgestures-thumbupright:

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37 minutes ago, chris sutton said:

Here's a few photos of my sheds

 

Been having a bit of a clear out, Chris? You can move about without having to walk sideways. :roll:

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1 minute ago, Stormin said:

 

Been having a bit of a clear out, Chris? You can move about without having to walk sideways. :roll:

At the end of the day there's 2 Raider 12s in the workshop and 2 more in the garage so I'm back to the sideways shuffle.

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T-MO :  You are killing me!   I laughed too hard!

 

Chris Sutton:  I knew that if I posted (since I have no shame)  that somone would post with a lot more cramming than I could figure out!

 

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I can't believe I missed this thread! What great pictures and ideas.

Now I know I must be normal cause mine is full as well. If the church ever returns the camera my wife loaned them (mine of course)  I will post some pics.

I have some from a while back you have seen in different threads of tractors but not the grand tour photo shoot that needs to be posted here.  :)

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No wonder there are no Wheel Horse spares (parts in American English) available anywhere in the UK!

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1 hour ago, ztnoo said:

No wonder there are no Wheel Horse spares (parts in American English) available anywhere in the UK!

rotfl.gif

 

 Chris has 'em all. What he doesn't want he tries to unload on me.

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On 12/27/2016 at 0:30 AM, PeacemakerJack said:

Todd--that lift is super cool.  Looks like a real back saver.  One of those WILL be in my shop someday!  

It is indeed a back saver! I highly recommend it!

Looking at all these garages and :wh:'s makes me think of this and smile....I know many of you can relate....

HorseLaugh.jpg

 

 

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 You guys have inspired me to start a general clean up of my home shop. What I am working on right now is 256 lineal feet X 16inches of shelving. This shelving is perhaps the most efficient use of materials possible and it was all cut in about four hours and assembled in four more The back of the shelves is simply a strandboard direct nail wall surface follow that with wall cleats of the same material, drop legs of 3/4 plywood strapping firmly attached to the rafters above, a continuous band of [2 layer] laminated plywood hung on the drop legs and then screwed to them. The front shelf band includes a rabbet so the shelving drops in flush with the front band. Hanging the shelves from the top is a very clean installation in that the floor beneath the hanging shelves can be kept clean and is a great place to store the super heavy 5 gallon buckets full of sand or ceramic tile. I have thrown some pretty heavy loads on the shelves and they held up well for nearly 30 years. I am working from the back to the front so I can put the Oliver Super 88 Diesel inside while i am using it to move the roofing lift around the house. 

 

 This is but one section of shelving in my long term storage area that measures 15 x8o feet..I need to re-organize it so i can get the mess out of my other shop areas that i use all the time. Posting it here motivates me to continue so i can show the results. 

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