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ebinmaine

Coffee grounds drying station

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SylvanLakeWH

The reason one composts is to organically break down the unique characteristics of each component material into humus… plants love humus… leaves, grass, wood (chips, dust, twigs) and any other green stuff (except toxic / poison) coffee grounds included… will break down into humus… mixed with soil it will improve said soils…

 

it ain’t rocket science. I should know, I’m not a rocket scientist…and I don’t play one on tv either… :lol:

 

Want to avoid critters - don’t include any food products even if they are compostable… I only use leaves, plant cuttings and grass clippings… 

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Stormin
On 1/7/2022 at 6:26 PM, ebinmaine said:

created a drying station

  I'd point Carols sister, who lives not far enough away to this topic. If she was speaking to me that is. Tea bags on the washing line just don't look right and make weak tea. 

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ebinmaine
2 minutes ago, Stormin said:

Tea bags on the washing line just don't look right and make weak tea

Recycling is great for some things. 

Not that...

 

😵💫

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6wheeler
On 1/7/2022 at 6:21 PM, Snoopy11 said:

Well, since we are copying and pasting from Google about topics... that none of use are experts on... I will join in... :P

 

Coffee grounds do contain residual caffeine, and this caffeine inhibits both seedlings and mature plants from growing as they should. If you have young plants in particular or have just put in seeds, it’s best to not have coffee grounds anywhere near these. Coffee can destroy the roots of new plants, which leads to their demise even before they’re able to grow much.

 

Don

Thanks Don. You said it before I did :thumbs:. Though I am definitely NOT an expert? No coffee grounds....... Our Idea of composting is? Table/cooking scraps (no bones), leaves, garden waste (including pulled weeds that haven't seeded), grass clippings, old straw and moldy hay (the cows won't eat it), any of the veggies from the garden that may be rotting or damaged beyond use. I just have a compost pile down by the gardens. It is pretty good sized, I stir it with the Bobcat. In a dry year like we have had? I water the pile too. When I "stocked" the pile in the fall of 2020? I threw a couple of pumpkins and some Argonaut squash that was left over into the pile. Last spring when I stirred it up? They pretty much got smashed up. I was watering the pile and noticed pumpkins and squash sprouting out of the pile. I watered it and let them go. I got 4 nice sized pumpkins and 2 squash from it. I never thought of my compost pile as a garden. But? Surprise.. As far as attracting critters? I always seem to need to get rid of the extra bullets in my 22. So? no problem.

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ebinmaine
5 minutes ago, 6wheeler said:

Thanks Don. You said it before I did :thumbs:. Though I am definitely NOT an expert? No coffee grounds....... Our Idea of composting is? Table/cooking scraps (no bones), leaves, garden waste (including pulled weeds that haven't seeded), grass clippings, old straw and moldy hay (the cows won't eat it), any of the veggies from the garden that may be rotting or damaged beyond use. I just have a compost pile down by the gardens. It is pretty good sized, I stir it with the Bobcat. In a dry year like we have had? I water the pile too. When I "stocked" the pile in the fall of 2020? I threw a couple of pumpkins and some Argonaut squash that was left over into the pile. Last spring when I stirred it up? They pretty much got smashed up. I was watering the pile and noticed pumpkins and squash sprouting out of the pile. I watered it and let them go. I got 4 nice sized pumpkins and 2 squash from it. I never thought of my compost pile as a garden. But? Surprise.. As far as attracting critters? I always seem to need to get rid of the extra bullets in my 22. So? no problem.

 

We have friends with a fair amount of tomatoes that grew in a rot pile. 

Worked out better than they were hoping for. 

 

Such a shame you have extra bullets but it's good you have a place to rid yourself of the things too. 

😂

 

 

 

How often do you pull from the pile to use the composted material in gardens?

 

 

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6wheeler
1 hour ago, ebinmaine said:

 

We have friends with a fair amount of tomatoes that grew in a rot pile. 

Worked out better than they were hoping for. 

 

Such a shame you have extra bullets but it's good you have a place to rid yourself of the things too. 

😂

 

 

 

How often do you pull from the pile to use the composted material in gardens?

 

 

Generally? Each year I can take a couple of buckets from the pile. It really depends on how much hay and straw are in the pile. Watering the pile does help it break down faster. I did make another 40'x40' garden last fall. So? I took 3 buckets out and spread them on that garden along with some fill sand and worked it in. I will plant patty pan squash and some other summer squash in it this year. After this season? I will put some composted cow manure on it and plow it. Here is a tip for tomatoes. If you are going to start some. When it is time to plant them?  in the bottom of the hole? Take 1 horse apple (manure), go to your nearest slough and get some of the decaying matter. Put the apple in the bottom and put about 3 cups of the swamp juice on top of it. Put the tip of the tomato root into the juice and bury the tomato. You will be surprised how well it works. BTW. Don't use horse manure as a fertilizer over your garden. Horses cannot digest weed seeds. It ends up in the "Apples". You get well fertilized weed seed. But? In this situation? Burying it deep in the hole? It is too deep for the weed seeds to grow. 

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Jeff-C175
45 minutes ago, 6wheeler said:

bury the tomato

 

Yep.  I usually leave the top two leaves of the seedling sticking out just so I know where I planted it!  Pinch off all the lower leaves and bury it.  Tomatoes send roots out from the part of the stem that's buried.  Makes for a very sturdy root system right off the bat.

 

Now, if I could just find a solution to the durn 'late blight', I'd be a happy grower!

 

 

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