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Greentored

help the veg garden noob!

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Greentored

 Spent much of my young life in gramp's vegetable garden, mainly picking up rocks, pulling weeds, snapping beans, and an occasional rap upside the head, so thats about all the experience I have with a garden.

I decided to put one in this year at my new place and see what happens, the horse handled the plowing and disc'ing just fine, and here in NC its about time to put stuff in the ground. Id estimate it about 40x40.

The previous owner grew beans in the same spot, but has been gone 7-8 years. The soil looks great. Between the home and tree line, the garden will see full sun from an hour after sunrise to maybe 3 hours before sunset.

  On the list thus far: potatoes, onions, leeks, bell peppers, cucumbers, carrots, zucchini/squash, rutabaga, beets. May attempt some tomatoes but told they need daily watering, and Im only there on weekends. There is a second, good well on the property that I plan to hook back up and run a sprinkler on a timer.

 My neighbor says 'get the potatoes in NOW' and has planted hers. The NC planting schedule says to start a lot of these others indoors and replant the seedlings.

1. what is your experience/advice on getting the listed goods in the ground?

2. I will have more than we can eat, likely even with the neighbors and friends help. Can any of these be stored/preserved/frozen?

3. What the heck do I do with a crop that 'comes in' in 90 days? Am I done? Replant?

Thanks in advance!!!

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Greentored
Posted (edited)

PS- am told a fake owl in the garden, and marigolds around the perimeter will help ward off evil spirits- like birds, rabbits, deer, snakes. Theres plenty of deer and rabbits around. Bad snakes will be handled by the 40 S&W or 1911:lol:

Edited by Greentored
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Achto
Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, Greentored said:

potatoes, onions, leeks, bell peppers, cucumbers, carrots, zucchini/squash, rutabaga, beets

 

24 minutes ago, Greentored said:

Can any of these be stored/preserved/frozen?

 

Potatoes should be kept in a cool, dry, vented, dark place, depending on what kind you plant they can keep up to 3 or 4 months. Onions will keep the same way.

 

Onions, peppers, carrots & zucchini I know can be frozen.

 

Cucumbers either eat or pickle. My mom always canned beets in order to keep them.

 

Don't know much about leeks or rutabaga.

 

When in doubt "Google".:)

 

 

 

Edited by Achto
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BPEisenhower

Potatoes are typically planted on good Friday. Once harvested, do not wash dirt off since water will reactivate the growth cycle. Onions typically like a soil that's fairly loose and A M S is a good fertilizer readily available for use. Tomatoes depending on determinant and indeterminate like dry conditions but can suffer from stem/fruit rot if overwatered. Try grass clippings or straw for around the base of each plant since moisture will be under the canopy and will provide a barrier between the ground and fruit itself. You can also opt to spread either pellet lime or regular lime to condition the soil depending on its current pH. Most times a 13-13-13 (NPK) value can benefit plant growth but can be increased/decreased on types of soil ( peat, black, timber AKA ( white ground) sand, silty, clay, loamy, ETC. Another alternative to dry granular fertilizer is also provided by cattle, horse, sheep and can be used as a manure tea, but the actual manure itself is beneficial to aid in the soil being able to breathe and easily tilled. However, hog, and chicken manure are high in Nitrogen and will kill or injure plants if applied heavily. Sometimes a yellowing or (Blight) can occur stunting or sudden death also. Also drainage should be observed since pools of standing water will not only attract bugs but also potentially drown or injure since water evaporates henceforth steam can overheat and Inhibit photosynthesis and chlorophyll and chloroplast is needed to maintain plant health.....there's more to rant about but break time is up! Lol. 😆. Hope this helps you

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Greentored

Thanks guys, this is the type of info I need!

@Achto Id rather get info from fellow horse addicts than google:handgestures-thumbup:

 I remember digging wild leeks in the woods when I was a kid. They just came back every year on their own in large patches. The plan is to literally broadcast a couple handfuls of seed along the edge near the trees and see what happens.

 Never grew rutabagas, but as hard as those things are, pretty sure they will last about 14 years. 

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ebinmaine

I'm looking forward to the answers and information in this thread because Trina and I are beginning to garden a little more each year. Our ground is really only good for raising rocks and stones so we use raised beds to make plants grow.

Her mom preserves tomatoes, beans, cucumbers. Not sure what else.

Glass jars.

 

 

As to the animals and keeping them away I have a statement and a question.

The plastic owl will only keep birds away for about 48 hours. That is considered a maximum. At least up here in New England. Chickadees, much much less. There are very brazen bird.

What keeps birds away is not so much the size and shape of the owl but the fact that it is there and then it moves and then it is there and then it moves.

 

I've seen people hang paper plates from loose string. Tinsel from the holiday supply stores. You can lay human hair around and that deters a lot of deer because they don't like the smell.

 

So my question is... Seriously. Why do we not want snakes in a garden?

 

I was always told to leave them right alone because they eat the small rodents that are the actual problem.

 

 

 

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Skwerl58

I'm in SWVA, in the foothills and will set out the potatoes, onions and plant the green peas and radishes by the end of March. Good Friday is the day to plant beans is what my Grandpa always said and it worked for him but when Easter is early I haven't had good luck with mine. Corn, Squash, cukes, tomatoes and peppers I put in the ground mid to late  April depending on the temps.  To help the tomatoes and peppers use a little epsom salt to help prevent blossom end rot, it works! After the first crop comes in plant your pumpkins, winter squash and some black eye peas. 

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pullstart

If you use horse manure, be sure you know what they eat.  They can’t digest grass seed, so you’ll be growing more grass than veggies... though it does grow a good healthy veggie if you keep to weeding ever hour or so!

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pullstart

Also, “Pa Mac” from The Farm Hand’s Companion is a great YouTube channel to watch.  He’s very smart, though quite humorous and never actually talks on the show.

 

Here’s episode number one.  He has quite a few episodes now!

 

 

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Darb1964

Lots of good advice as always. I have been gardening as long as I can remember, as a kid with my grandparents and mother,now with my wife. We can, freeze, store as much as we can and it last through most of the year. Here in the Berkshires planting is months away, still snow covered. Just thinking about starting plants inside. First thing I will do in a few weeks is fertilize with all purpose fertilizer from tractor supply and lime. Hard to over lime in my area so I cover generosity every other year. Try to keep ph around seven. Then I add compost from animals, leaves, old hay, that I have mixed for at least a year. Never use fresh droppings especially chicken. Rabbit is very good and can be used sooner if that's what you have. Then I till it all in. Peas, lettuce, swiss chard and beets can be planted as soon as soil can be worked,I will wait at least a week after fertilizer to plant. Mid April is I have found harder time line to early, still will come ok but not much advantage most years. Then I will put in the potatoes if the weather has been dry and worm, plenty of time for them if I have to wait a few weeks, better than rotting if wet spring. I leave the potatoes in until October, cut the vines off when they start to turn yellow and feed to goats they love them. Hill them two or three times,make sure they are covered good. Carrots around May first and more lettuce. I have been putting in my corn second week of May last few years the new strains tolerate cool soil well and has helped insure it has time to mature. I try to wait planting the worm soil lovers like eggplant, summer squash, pepper until early june. They do not like cool nights. Read the seed packet on spacing and planting in your area. I think plants to close is the hardest thing for me to accomplish, pulling healthy plants is hard to do,but a must for a good crop. I fertilize every two weeks with the multi purpose fertilizer. Water as needed,  if has been dry you need to soak the ground,and I mean soak. Not good enough until you can dig two or three inches deep in soaked soil minimum. I try to water in the morning,helps prevent rotting. Need to have a spraying program for bugs and mold. Snakes are not a problem in my area they eat bugs and rodents, rattle snakes are few. I use Irish spring soap to keep deer and rodents out, crushed egg shell's keep slugs and soft skin bugs out. The gun if needed. Trouble you will have keeping up with weeds and watering if you can only go on the weekends. Harvesting also will be a challenge, when it comes in it needs to be picked daily for best results.   

 

Good luck

Lot of work to do it right, but very rewarding. everything seems to come at once.

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Cvans

Just one point to make here and add to the confusion your facing. We wash our potatoes in cold water shortly after harvesting. Then we place cardboard in a shaded well ventilated area and spread the potatoes out to dry. After drying they are bagged in burlap and stored in an area that is around 40 degrees for the winter. They are still nice with only very small starts showing the following April. 

Good luck and enjoy your garden. 

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Greentored

Geez, Bloomberg said farming was easy!  (Sorry, I had to lol)

How much of this stuff needs to be started indoors and replanted? Is it absolutely necessary for any in particular? If thats the case, need to get my a** in gear right now!

You all rock! I will be referencing this thread often over the next month or two. Being my first year, am not expecting to be on the front page of any newspaper with my 'prized, record setting vegetables' haha, but it will be a fun learning experience and no doubt at least produce a few nice veggies.

......It will also determine the size of next years garden:lol:

 

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ebinmaine

And of course. Don't forget. We're going to need lots and lots of pictures.

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953 nut
17 hours ago, Greentored said:

help ward off evil spirits- like birds, rabbits, deer, snakes. Theres plenty of deer and rabbits around.

This will chase off most unwanted visitors, just remember to turn it off when YOU are going into the garden.

https://www.havahart.com/critter-ridder-motion-activated-animal-repellent-sprinkler-5277

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Greentored
Posted (edited)
40 minutes ago, 953 nut said:

This will chase off most unwanted visitors, just remember to turn it off when YOU are going into the garden.

https://www.havahart.com/critter-ridder-motion-activated-animal-repellent-sprinkler-5277

That is awesome, had no idea those exist! thank you!

Agree on remembering to turn it off- I do have a bit of a temper at times, and can see that 44.00 item being smashed with whatever is in my hand if it soaks me:lol:

Edited by Greentored
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The Tool Crib

Planting marigolds around the garden helps to keep the afids away . I would

always pick up two or three flats of 

them and plant them all around the garden. Plus they ad a bit of color as 

well.

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Cvans
Quote

CRITTER RIDDER® MOTION-ACTIVATED ANIMAL REPELLENT & SPRINKLER

That's a great idea. Do you suppose I should tell the wife it's in the garden? :laughing-rolling:

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ebinmaine
12 minutes ago, Cvans said:

That's a great idea. Do you suppose I should tell the wife it's in the garden? :laughing-rolling:

No sir

 

No

 

Nope

 

 

 

 

Absolutely not....

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Razorback
Posted (edited)

I'm kinda tired at the moment but would like add some to this thread.... for now, can I point you here?  https://www.wheelhorseforum.com/topic/79833-after-2-year-hiatus-2019-garden/

 

On page 3 you'll see what we do with our taters since we don't have a cellar or other cool spot to store them. We also can green beans, cabbage, beets..... I would like to pressure can some beef and chicken, too.

Edited by Razorback
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Digger 66
Posted (edited)
On 3/5/2020 at 12:57 PM, Achto said:

 

 


Cucumbers either eat or pickle.

 

 

 

 

I can still remember the smells of my Gammas kitchen . She was 100% Polish , was widowed shortly after my father was born in '33 and raised 5 children by herself .

She grew her own ....EVERYTHING . Her entire backyard was her garden . 

Including the Dill to pickle the Cukes .

Her Polish Dills were Garlicy and just D E L I C I O U S !

What I wouldn't give for one of those now  :handgestures-thumbupright:

 

 

 

Edited by Digger 66
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Greentored
Posted (edited)

Thanks for all your help folks! Since everyone loves pictures, I attached one of the garden site from the balcony. The second pic is the hedge row that backs up to a good sized field. The row was full of shingles, trash, pieces of siding, and a lot of overgrowth. I cleared all, ripped it up a bit with the plow, stacked a TON of weight on the disc, and fixed it up nice. 

When I purchased the property, I was excited to see that huge field and lots of wildlife in it, but sad when the local farmer said "I lease that chunk and the owners sons hunt, she wont even let me hunt it."

On to plan B- the hedgerow is on my property- whatta perfect food plot location! Ordered a bag of "chic magnet" imperial clover/chicory seed mix, and plan to broadcast it heavy, run over it a couple times with the disc, let it grow wild and see what happens. Once fall rolls around, maybe Ill luck out and get a shot at a deer or turkey with the bow.

Will be posting up more over the next month as I start getting things in the garden and plumbing/hooking up the well and timer.

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Edited by Greentored
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Tractorhead

Great place to start👍

 

I did last year my first potatoe seed on a larger three row.

It was not realy planed long ahead, but i love it to see what it will bring as result.

Therefore i asked our local farmers here how to do best.

They give me the advice to just do it and see what happens - more or less.

 

So i started my first try in beginning of March. 

My enemys was voile, the eaten nearly one row (princess), but they don‘t seemed interested on the other two sorts.

The other two rows was Solara, i planing to insert this year again and another ( i forgot their name)  sort, but i don‘t like the taste.

so i don‘t get seeding of them this year.

The Solara was my best experiences once with the result and also with the Taste,

they are perfect for Salad or as garnish with a Steak or Grilled Meat.

 

so i started this year again a two row Solara planting.

Against Colorado Beetle i used Coffeepowder, that seemed to work so far for me.

This year i plan also between the Potatoes inserting additionally onions, but i‘m not sure if they like my soil.

but we will see.

 

To give the plants a bit advance i put few to accelerate the pregrow in a warm dark wooden plate in the pantry.

Than i cut them in quaters an set them in.

this year i will seed in nearly mid of march before eastern.

 

last year we had few day‘s light snow while Seed was in ground and be afraid it can be frozen, 

so i protect my seed with some stroh out of our neighbours cow stall.

maybe lightly „ contaminated“ 😂 but it helps my plants to grow.

That work pretty good and i don‘t have much loss, except the eatened by the voile.

 

 

Have some Fun and - just do it👍

Don‘t hesitate, or set youself under pressure, see each grown as a gift.

simply start and you will be learning with each seed.

 

Each plant you harvesting out of your own garden is a Gift from Mother nature to you.

and i bet you feel the same as me, each own harvested goods, 

is the best stuff you‘ve ever eaten that‘s the best of all results. 😎👍

 

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Greentored

Update- the potatoes are in, food plot is in for the deer (imperial clover/chicory), and I roughed everything up again yesterday with the disc and drag, getting ready to plant. Damn this NC dirt packs down something fierce- I may actually turn it one more time before discing and planting.

I am very fortunate to have a second well on the property which will be used for the garden only. The plan was to use the jet pump but relocate the pump into the 'home' well house 20ft away, but the pump requires two lines and a lot of work to make it happen. The plan now is to buy a cheap submersible well pump and drop it in- quick and easy. Its only a 50 footer so no need for a big dollar pump.

  Will keep you all in the loop, and no doubt will have more questions haha.

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ebinmaine
7 minutes ago, Greentored said:

- I may actually turn it one more time before discing and planting

 

 

 

When in doubt, turn it out!

 

 

 

I have no idea if that's real or not. It just sounded good to me at the time.......

 

:lol:

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Greentored
Just now, ebinmaine said:

 

 

 

When in doubt, turn it out!

 

 

 

I have no idea if that's real or not. It just sounded good to me at the time.......

 

:lol:

In the hotrod world, we say "just send it!"

Is that what youre saying? :lol::lol:

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