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PeacemakerJack

The "Iron Horse" Restification--Dad's 875

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THE RESTO:

My dad always worked The Iron Horse really hard but he took care of it just as religiously.  The oil was changed every year, sometimes more often if needed.  The hyrdo fluid was changed on a regular schedule.  Every zerk got some grease every time we used the tractor whether it needed it or not!  The hydro fan screen was cleaned of debris after every lawn mowing.  This tractor received great maintenance from 1975 through today and it shows.  Take a look at these 50 year old front end parts!

 

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The pivot pin and spindles are in good condition even after all these years and hours.  The steering gear is fairly worn but still in amazing shape after how many turns that it has gone through.

 

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The front rims aren't in bad shape and so we elected to use a stripping wheel and a buffer to strip off the old paint.  Dad is sending the rear rims to be sandblasted but since the front wheel bearings are still in great shape, we didn't want to chance getting sand in them.

 

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They look almost custom, like puller rims, with all the paint stripped off.  We of course want to create that "little tractor" look and so the tires that have been on it since it left the factory in 1965 will now be relived of duty...

 

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We looked at several different styles but liked these the best to achieve the look we were going for (The original tire is on the right of course!)   Dad is going to keep one of the originals to display on the wall.  Although you cant tell it in these pics, the originals had a lot of dry cracking and checking...

 

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Something tells me that these new tires aren't likely to last as long as the originals even with far less use.  I'm not convinced that the new rubber compounds are as durable and longlasting as the old stuff.Dad also decided to start prepping the hood too.

 

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A couple of things to note about this hood.  First,  you'll notice the bondo where dad brased the holes shut that he put in about 25 years ago for the headlights.  Wait till you see the picture of this thing with my brother on it in about 1995 with those big ugly fog lights hanging off the sides of the hood!  Next, if you are very familiar with this series of WH you'll notice that dad's hood bulges out on both sides quite a bit.  That was done in about 1978 to accomodate the new K301 which repowered the Horse after removing the tired old 8hp.  The 12 was a much bigger engine dimentionally and required several key adaptions, the hood tweaking being a key one!  After dad was happy with the finish, he shot the first coat of primer to protect the metal from flashing until he was ready for final prep and paint.  

 

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THE STORY:

 

The horse has been more than a garden tractor for the last 40 years to our family, it has been part of the memories that have shaped our lives.  As i dug through literally thousands of pictures and slides I found numerous pics like the next couple that I'll share with you here.  These are just a sampling of the many I looked at...

 

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My dad had begun to fix up the old 1966 Scout here in about 1977!  Here my mom is taking in the whole scene while dad snaps a shot of his handiwork thus far.  Please take note of the tool box in the foreground that is the same one in the current pictures above.  Also note the Iron Horse sitting just outside the garage door while dad was doing the heavy grinding and bodywork.  Mind you, that every night that tractor was brought inside and protected from the elements.  We boys were in big trouble if we came in the house to "chill out" during a rain storm and left the "horse" outside!

 

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This pic is a little older than the last one, probably around 1975, because the tractor in the background doesn't have the vertical pipe on it yet.   Dad is working on his 1970 Kawasaki 500 Mach III bike.  It was the first of the superbikes and was powered by a three cylinder two stroke engine.  Dad said he was always wrenching on it, but it was a ton of fun to drive and really fast!  That spot at the end of the bench is where the Iron Horse was "stabled" from 1975 until mom and dad moved in 1994.   I remember when I first learned to drive it and cut the lawn that I was too scared and dad was too smart to let me back it in there.  I would always turn it off outside and dad would bring it in and park it there.  The welder was on one side and the work bench on the other.

 

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In 1982, dad and his brothers built an addition on to the back of our house.  This is me standing in the newly laid crawl space.  While working on that project, my oldest cousin David was using the 875 to roll dad's lawn.

 

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A discerning eye will see just the back of the tractor headed by the cement truck.  My cousin Paul and I are standing there in our Bibs while my Uncle Rog wheels another load of cement to the foundation.

 

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My parents often kept guests at their house.  I'm not sure why but it seems like in those days that they ended up driving the Horse more times than not!  It was almost like a pseudo "go-kart" at times.  Here one of those guests is taking it for a spin and discovering the quick take of speed of a hydro WH!

 

I hope you enjoy these pictures and stories of how this little tractor was intertwined with the fabric of our life...

 

 

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Lets talk about WH seat material for a little bit.  To me it seems like the original stuff was pretty prone to drying out and splitting apart.  The Iron Horse was only 10 years old when dad bought it and yet the seat was already in sorry shape.  The tractor had spent some time outside and the sun along with the elements had already done a job on this thing...

 

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From this angle it doesn't look too bad (Circa 1979).  But same day, opposite side...

 

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I don't know if you guys have ever worn light fabric shorts while riding on a seat in that condition, but it can pinch you like a six month old baby!  Mom wasn't a fan and so she set dad to the process of making a new seat cover.  He got a hold of some very durable vinyl and made his own cover...

 

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This is the cover that was on it from 1980-2015.  It was starting to crack and look nasty but it served its purpose well for a long time.  However, It is now time to make something new.  We took the old seat apart...

 

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Needless to say, the bottom of the pan wasn't looking great.  I can't imagine what that would look like on a tractor that was always stored outside!  We sanded it down and primed and painted it.

 

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I had bought dad a pristine condition sales brochure for the 875 for Christmas.  After looking at the pictures of the original pattern, we decided to duplicate it as closely as possible.  Dad is a master at fabrication of things and he decided to use a cheap fabric to make a template for the cover.  Now, what to use for the actual seat material?  I have a buddy who works for a major airplane manufacturer in our area.  He told me that he could get his hands on scraps of premium leather that they use to cover the seats of 50 million dollar aircraft.  I told him that I needed black and white.  He was able to come up with the white right away but it took a couple of months to get some Black.  Finally he had some for us and we are off and running.

 

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The mock up is on the right and the leather scraps on the left.  We then turned the finished pattern into a local leather seamstress and they took care of the rest!  

 

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It may not be a perfect original seat cover but it looks sweet and should be very suitable for the little work duty this boy will see these days!

Nothing like a genuine leather saddle on a thoroughbred horse!!!

 

 

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55 minutes ago, AMC RULES said:

From our vendor list...

 

Thank you for including this here as it will be a big help to anyone restoring one of these tractors that follows this thread.  It would've been much easier and in the end cheaper to purchase the above replica. I certainly don't recommend all the work we went to but it makes a super cool "one-of-a-kind" seat. It also has a neat background story much like the rest of the tractor.  

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Really have enjoyed this thread with the old pictures and the story to go with them.  The tractor looks great now.  Great job!

 

I can totally relate to getting the project done faster than getting updates posted. Have been guilty of that a few times myself.  

 

Dave

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THE RESTO: 

 

The disassembly continues!  It is easy to pull them apart unless they are super rusty, putting them together (especially after paint) takes a little more work and precision!

 

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If you look carefully at this picture you will see something unique mounted to the frame.  Anyone who has used this vintage of WH horse for any length of time know that the hydro likes to walk out of neutral fairly easy once they are worn.  Dad decided to "engineer" a true "parking Brake" on his tractor.  We both understand that their is a friction adjustment on these tractors but with the old parts, it seems like it doesn't last real long and then it begins to loosen.  Dad noticed that the brake pedal linkage travels right next to the frame.  So, he took a heavy duty hinge and modified it to have one "finger" that tilts out until it touches the brake linkage rod.  Them we pushed the pedal all the way down and marked the rod where the finger was located.  Dad then took a small piece of rod and welded it to the linkage rod in the proper orientation.  This way, you press the brake pedal down, then flip the finger out to rest behind the stop on the rod.  It is a positive parking brake that works like a charm and is easily reached from the drivers seat.  Once painted, its hardly noticeable except by the most discerning eye.  

 

THE STORY:  

 

This is out of chronological order but it fits here!  It was about 1992 and I was cutting the lawn.  It was one of those sticky summer days and the RD deck was spewing clippings all over me!  I was about halfway finished with the lawn when I decided to run in the house and grab a drink of water.  I parked the Horse right in front of the house,unlocked the throttle, and quickly ran inside leaving the 875 idling in the front yard.  I was enjoying the cold fresh water when I heard dad yell from his office, "Who left the tractor running unattended?"  His office was right beside the front door of the house with a large window facing that direction.  He heard the tractor moving and looked up to see it idling across the front yard!  I bolted for the front door and glimpsed the Iron Horse as it came to rest "nose" against the ash tree in the front yard.  The tires were just clawing it the grass as I ran to the tractor and pulled back on the SR lever!  It put a little dent in the front hood which dad finally removed with this restoration.

 

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This picture brings to mind another story that I am too young to remember but dad has shared several times over the years.  I don't know if any of you have run into this on your tractors but I thought it was interesting enough to share here.  Dad was cutting the lawn when he hit a big bump.  All the sudden, the tractor began to feel very strange!  It felt very strange, almost like a car that has bad shocks.  It was bouncing up and down across the yard as he drove.  He limped it to the garage and began his inspection.  The plate in the above picture that hold the rear end to the frame broke loose!  Talk about a spongy ride!  Dad took everything apart as far as needed to weld it back together.  Then he did the farmer thing and "beefed" it up with some extra steel and welding.  It has held sound for nearly 35 years.  

 

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In the above picture you can see the small piece of rod welded to the brake linkage.  Lots of cleaning, sanding, and prepping for paint!

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Here are a couple of pictures of the above positive parking brake lock...

 

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this is with the brake pedal in its relaxed position.  Note the short retention Rod and the finger angled back behind it.

 

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here the brake pedal is depressed and the finger is flipped on to the brake Rod just behind the retention piece.

 

 

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The RESTO:

At this point in any tractor restoration project, the formula is the same: inspect the parts for wear, decide if they need repair or replacement, then clean, prime, and paint... I wouldn't have to post these pictures but I know you guys too well {:wwp:

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Some of you may cry "Foul" that we didn't strip the frame further than this.  However, dad and I made an executive decision at this point that we had it far enough for a tractor that had been restored about 30 years previous and had been stored inside ever since.  56.JPG

 

It is always awesome when your shop begins to look like a "chop shop"--meaning that once you start hanging and painting all the detail parts it is such a good feeling.  You know by this point that you are getting close to the super fun stage of any resto--THE REASSEMBLY!:banana-dance:  We went through every piece.  Some items we have decided to paint red as they did it at the factory.   Some of the items we opted to paint black or silver to give it a custom, detailed look.  I had been watching Aldon's GT-16 resto and loved what he was doing there.  We did some of the same types of things after seeing how awesome his turned out!  Thanks Aldon for the inspiration!

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Then it is time to lay out all the parts and make sure that you have everything ready for assembly.  How many times have you guys in the excitement of this phase of a resto, realized that you forgot to restore a certain key part that you needed to assemble your tractor and it held you up:no:?  Been there done that!

 

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In this photo you can see the borrowed cub air cleaner that dad got in 1978 from the parts bin at the IH dealer along with some others...

 

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Boy--This is a B-E-A-UTIFUL sight!  Isn't that fresh Valspar IH red sharp when it is glossy and fresh?  Assembly continues....

 

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Looks great!! I'm a big fan of highlighting parts with a different color. :handgestures-thumbupright:

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A great story, and I am so glad that it has remained a valued part of the family.  It doesn't get any better than this.

 

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The STORY:  

About 1979, the old 8hp was really tired and my dad's oldest brother Bob came across a new K301 stationary motor for a super good price.  Dad decided that it was rebuild the old 8hp or repower with a brand new 12hp.  The K301 seemed to be a no brainer to a man in a family where bigger is always better! If 10hp is good, 16hp is better or so goes the thinking.  Dad took one long look at the Iron Horse and thought that a fresh set of new "clothes" would look good to go with the heart transplant.  The nice thing was that he still worked at Chief Equipment in 1978 and they had all the equipment to paint.  Dad did all the work for that resto at Chief.  Try as I might, I can't find any pictures or slides of it being worked on while there.  That would be really cool if there were but alas, it isn't to be.  I'm glad as many pictures exist of it as we do have...

 As any of you know who have studied the short frame tractors, there are a lot of subtle differences between the early small engine models and the later 12hp models.  It wasn't a simple bolt in procedure.  (It was super fun to show Dad's tractor next to Achto's 1076 this summer!  We looked at many of those differences side by side.  I must say here that the quality of Achto's tractor is even more amazing in person than it is in pictures!)  Dad welded Studs to the frame to accomodate the wider engine pan bolt pattern.  As previously stated, he ad to widen the contours of the hood on both sides to clear the engine.  He had to fabricate his own S/G bracket to work with the width of the motor and make a hood bracket to raise the front of the hood for clearance.  What he didn't do which would have taken a ton of work to make or finding a parts tractor to rob from, was a taller dash tower.  (If I can ever make it to the end of this thread and the official "unveiling", I would like Achto to post some of his good quality pictures of his tractor next to dad's that he took at Symco for observation of the factory versus the Don Stertz fabrication! Not yet though!) Another thing dad had to deal with was the drive belt shield which was now too low and close to the wider engine.  I know that im forgetting some of the other items that dad had to do but that gives you a good idea of the work that went into it!  Dad used an acrylic enamel IH red that the were spraying on the big tractors there at Chief.  A few pics of the dealership back then...

 

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Dad setting up the "new" 815 IH combine!

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Driving the beast!

So, dad mixed up and shot the paint on his "horse" after all the fabrication and prep was finished.  I'm not sure what was mixed wrong or if it was just the conditions but dad said it took nearly three days for everything to dry well enough to be handled!  It was a super glossy finish though and turned out beautiful IMHO...

 

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He even took the time to paint the deck!  Speaking of the deck, O great WH gurus---HELP!  Would that deck have originally come on that tractor?  All the pics that I see of 875's the deck is more rounded.  I only ever see this deck on older WH tractors.  

Dad Stertz Slides II 1975-1984 019.JPG

This is of course the picture that I use for my Avatar.  My interest and love affair with these little red tractors grows more with everyone that I work on and even see.  However, for obvious reasons, this will always be my favorite!  Zoom in on these pics and you will notice some of the changes that I shared above.  By this point the factory throttle wasn't holding and dad replaced it with a chrome aftermarket T handle that is still on it today.  The above mentioned IH Cub muffler made its way on to the tractor at this time and still resides there today.  The front spindle dust covers were still on the tractor at this time.  Those were unfortunately lost somewhere along the journey over the next 30 plus years.  My dad is my greatest earthly hero for reasons too numerous to share here, however even as an adult he amazes me with: his tenacity to finish a project with excellence, his awesome fabrication skills, and his ability to take a problem situation and turn it into a success!  HERE'S TO DAD!

 

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I'm really enjoying the family history as well as the tractor's history, they both go hand in hand.. Great thread and great pics!

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1 hour ago, Ken B said:

I'm really enjoying the family history as well as the tractor's history, they both go hand in hand...

Ken--it has been a blast telling this story.  It has been so much fun digging for photos and asking my family members for memories of the Iron Horse.  And it's not finished yet!  This is a great little tractor with a long history in one family that continues today with my children!  They love to drive it as much as I did...

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Well after a few month hiatus, time for another installment:

The STORY:

After dad finished the first 'resto' on the 875 it was pressed right back into duty.  As I've said numerous times in this thread, dad was and is a stickler for maintenance of his stuff however he isn't afraid to use it.  The horse was used for mowing, gardening and playing...

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This was a family tradition back in those days.  Dad would tie the radio flyer wagon to the back of the tractor and then take me and mom on rides around the yard.  It was really a lot of fun and is probably the reason today that i let my kids drive their GT's around the yard when they are old enough and give rides to the little ones.  

 

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Do I look right at home in that drivers seat or what?  My work boots, Oshkosh B'Gosh bibs, and engineer hat:auto-dirtbike:  You can see from these pictures that this tractor was used.  My parents always put a premium on family time.  They still do to this day.  As I write this post, they have my two oldest children with them on a short vacation trip.  The kids are having a blast!  I hope and pray that I am doing the same for my own children and someday for their kids too!

 

The RESTO:

 

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The engine was next.  Dad has the expertise to completely rebuild one of these but because of his now very busy work schedule, he elected to have it rebuilt for him.  A shop about 25 miles away did all the machining and internal work...

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We did everything else!

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As always, its great to see the paint go on the key parts.

 

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Because dad had overhauled this rear end in the not so distant past and it wasn't showing any signs of leaking or issues, we elected to strip it down...

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clean it well...

 

and paint it up pretty!  Finally getting close to the serious assembly!

 

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Edited by PeacemakerJack
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I really enjoyed this 875 restore, the old pictures of it in use by your dad, you and friends.    

 

The strength of the Wheel Horse as a garden tractor is really undisputed but when you see how one that is cared for over 50 years fares, you know it could last 100 years with good maintenenace. 

 

Thank you for taking the time to post this restore and your family history with the Wheel Horse .  

 

 Peacemaker,  Red Square is better the more people that take the time to delve into the past, present and perserve for the future!

 

 

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Edited by Lane Ranger
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1 hour ago, Lane Ranger said:

I really enjoyed this 875 restore, the old pictures of it in use by your dad, you and friends...

 

 Peacemaker,  Red Square is better the more people that take the time to deleve into the past, present and perserve for the future!

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Thank you for your kind words.  

 

I know this is a very wordy thread but it is exactly the quote above from you that makes me want to share it.  How many times have we found horses that have been used, abused, and neglected?  How many times have we said, "if this :wh: could talk, the stories it could tell!"?  @achto Rat Rod makes me think of that.  When I see young families playing and working with their horses like @Rp.wh or @dtallon it takes me back to my own childhood and the very cool memories that I have centered around the 875.  I hope that others can and will be encouraged by this story and it's not over yet!  

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On 8/18/2016 at 4:10 PM, PeacemakerJack said:

Would that deck have originally come on that tractor?

That is the correct deck for a 1965 :wh:

 

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@PeacemakerJack that is one heck of a story and enjoyed every bit  :greetings-clappingyellow: . Love all of the old pics and thank you for taking us on your journey of many good memories . 

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I just stumbled across this thread.  It's great read, and I only read the last page of it.  I'll have to go back to the first page and start from the beginning.  Great thread, and great family history, and great documentation, and finally, a great restore.

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Thanks again guys for the positive comments.  I'm so glad that some of you out there enjoy reading this.  It is the only tractor that I can write a story like this about because it is the only one that has been in my family for this long and has affected me personally in so many ways.  My relatives have full size CASE tractors that have been in the family since they were new but those are different animals for a different forum.  When I decided to sit down and write this a little over two years ago, I had no idea that it would take me this long to accomplish but it has happened this way for two reasons: one--I'm a very busy person and I usually can't devote the time to something like this that I want to and two--I am only going to record this story one time and so I want to do it right  and that means unearthing the old slides and photos that you guys seem to enjoy.  There are still some more stories to tell and believe it or not, some more pictures to include so please check in periodically to check out the new content.

 

The STORY:

 

Let's fast forward a couple of years to about 1983.  This is an important time because my only sibling, Nathan, was born that year.  He was my best buddy all through my years growing up and he is still a good friend today.  With the nature of the life that we lived as missionary kids travelling all across the U.S. and occasionally overseas, we learned to entertain ourselves with the games that we came up with.  Nathan spent as much time on the Iron Horse as I did over the years just a half decade after me.  When I got into the work force then he took over lawn mowing duties and it was the 875 that he used as I did up to that point.

 

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This is Dad, me, and Nate about 4 months after his birth.  Something happened this summer that I'll never forget.  It could've had horrific results but my Guardian Angel was looking out for me double time.  My parents had given me the bike that my mother had learned to ride on when she was a little girl.  It was a vintage Schwinn that probably would be worth some coin today.

 

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(Note: Dad's fabrication skills in the background.  Just over the front wheel of my bike is a log splitter that dad built to mount on the front of his '66 IH scout.  He could take the plow off and put this in its place.  It ran off the truck hydraulics that were in place to operate the plow!)

 

I started in the winter and early spring riding with the training wheels that you see pictured here.  By summer time I was confident enough to ride without the training wheels and then I became invincible when I was on my bike!  I could ride anywhere and do anything.  I would pretend that I was a super hero and would race around on my superbike.  One of the things that my parents had always told me was to stay away from the lawn mower when either of them were cutting.  As a six year old boy, I wasn't always obedient.  One day my mom was cutting the lawn and I was out riding her old 1950's vintage Schwinn which was now mine. I decided that I could ride right behind her and she would never know that I was being disobedient.  It worked for a few passes around the yard until on one quick back up and turn, I was right in her blindspot.  With the RD deck and open back, it gobbled up that Schwinn like some old dry branches!  I still believe to this day that "my angel" pushed me off the back of the bike on to the ground and protected my feet and legs from severe injury.  My bike was mangled  but amazingly the deck wasn't damaged!  The most traumatic part of the whole experience was mom's reaction to what had happened.  First the shock and surprise of running over something that wasn't supposed to be there, then the realization that it was her son/bike, then the momentary horror of thinking that she had severely injured me, then the relief that I was ok, then the dismay of my disobedience that could've caused permanent damage to me.  I didn't fully appreciate that until I was grown and had children of my own.  I promise you that I think of that instance every time that I cut the lawn and see my kids playing in the yard.  This summer my third born Judge was riding his bike and I caught him trying to follow me.  You can bet that I stopped the tractor and went and Had a discussion with him about the lesson that I had learned all those years ago!   

 

The RESTO:

For any of you that have ever restored one of these cool little tractors, this is the most fun part--assembly!  With every piece that goes on, you are one step closer to having a running, clean, refreshed tractor that will be ready to show or to GO!  62.JPG

 

I'm mounting up the 23x8.50-12 Carlisle TruPowers on the rear end.

 

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Installing the S/R lever and preparing the frame to receive the rear end

 

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I thought that dad did a great job of painting some parts with the bright silver and black to accent the amazing red paint!

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It was cool mounting up the rear end while listening to dad tell me the story about the broken frame that I shared in an above post.  He told me how he had gusseted the frame to strengthen it for further use and he was happy that it had held all these years!

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Next it was the front axle and wheels with the Firestone Tri Ribs.  I suppose I should do some scouting around and see if anyone has a set of good condition caps to cover the front wheel bolts.  Ours broke and disappeared over the years.  I love the look of this little tractor as it comes together.  IMHO nothing looks as sweet as RED, BLACK, and WHITE together except for the RED, WHITE, and BLUE on Ol' Glory:flags-waveusa:!

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Sheet metal is next...:woohoo:

 

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30 minutes ago, PeacemakerJack said:

see if anyone has a set of good condition caps to cover the front wheel bolts.

http://www.wheelhorseforum.com/forum/54-glen-pettit-restoration-parts/

Glen Pettit makes them and lots of other cool stuff for our :wh:.

36 minutes ago, PeacemakerJack said:

third born Judge was riding his bike and I caught him trying to follow me.

I am enjoying the story of your 875. I have about a dozen :wh: and have no history on any of them. Funny how you life lessons come full circle with children and grandchildren; thanks for sharing.    :text-coolphotos:   you are doing a great job!   :handgestures-thumbupright:

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20161008_115923.jpg

Almost seemed a crime to make it work.... well maybe not!

20161008_133331.jpg

But that guy behind me is tailgating and has no cup holder!  Oh sorry Steve ...that's Uncle Rodger on the Cub...looked like you from a distance!

Edited by WHX9
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Thanks Jim for the pics.  Zac-Man is right at home on that horse just like I was when I was his age!  Regarding the cup holders, isn't it funny how back then, cigarette lighters were standard fair on many GT's and today it is cup holders?  The kids ask me nearly every spring when we get the GTO out of winter storage why it doesn't have cup holders!!!:lol:  They can't believe it when I tell them that there didn't used to be free refills on soda and people weren't  typically downing 64 oz of soda in a meal!  

 

Regarding the use of the Iron Horse: People could argue both ways.  I don't mind taking it out occasionally to do a little plowing if the conditions are right, mostly I feel that it should get the rest that it has earned and be used primarily for play and shows.  It would hold its own with most show tractors but with its awesome history, it needs to be used occasionally!  No more mowing, blowing, or hard dirty use.  Not that it can't handle it...

 

 

Reflecting on the backing over stuff with a RD deck made me think of another story that I had completely forgotten about.  Anyone who has spent any time gardening or farming is familiar with the stalk stubble left after combining or harvesting corn.  In agriculture, they have a machine called a stalk chopper.  Well, I recall my dad using the 875 with the RD deck as a "pseudo stalk chopper" in the late fall right before setting it up for snow removal.  He would leave the stalks up after picking the corn in the summer,  when they had yellowed sufficiently, some would become decorations for the front of the house until Christmas lights went up.  The rest would stand until he had decided that there would be no more lawn mowing until the following spring.  At this point, he would back the tractor up to the row of corn, fire up the deck and back slowly over the corn stalks chopping and "mulching" them up. I can still picture that in my mind today and dad hasn't had a garden in probably 30 years!  That corn debris would then be plowed under before the snow hit.  Dad would then remove the deck, sharpen the blades, clean the underside of the deck thoroughly, and then coat it with waste oil.  He would always tell me while he was cleaning and oiling that deck, "If you take care of your things, they will last.  If you neglect them, they will fail and you'll be stuck having to buy replacement pieces which costs money and we aren't made of money.  So take care of your things!"  Thanks for that advice dad, all these years later.

We still have that deck in fully operational shape to this day.  It hasn't been repainted since 1978 but if dad wanted to use it, it would be ready to go!  Those deck were built so tough and with the way that the belts were routed, it was nearly impossible to slip them unless you engaged something like a steel survey marker sticking up a couple of inches (not that I would know anything about that! :roll:)

Edited by PeacemakerJack
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Peacemak-erJack  I am not sure why I missed this post. But I hope I can add to the long list of comments. My parents[ My Mother] also was the picture taker and as we where kids we all thought she was a pain in the A>> but now we now know that she was leaving a legacy. So with that I can see you fell the same way. It is all we have wen they are gone. Also Great Job on the Restore. I guess I will change my opinion about auto`s I had this and it never worked great. Even with the hard to get original belt new. Enjoy it with your family. Do you have the original 8?

Champlain also selling the 1075 017.jpg

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