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Jaydubz83

C100 K241 Teardown

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Jaydubz83

Hey y'all 

Finally got some time to get w a buddy to do a tear down on the K241 from the 75 C100 8sp.

 

Granted, I've never done anything like this before but even still, I was really surprised by the condition of the internals given the fact the tractor has sat for years without running.  True testament to the quality of Kohler.  I was expecting to find quite a mess inside as I did on the outside of the block. :wicked:

It's going to a machine shop to have the cylinder honed, a couple of bolts extracted and the exhaust inlet removed (no amount of heat, cutting or blunt force combined got it to break loose)

 

Here's where imma need some insight from my local-ish (Maine) peeps.  I've never taken anything to get machined so I'm not sure what I'm looking at cost wise.  Also, there are bolts that will need to be extracted from the flywheel as they stripped out trying to get the screen cover off the housing to finish cleaning out the engine.  I've seen a couple (flywheels) for sale for between 40 and 60 bucks on ebay but I wonder if it would be best (cost-wise) to buy one of them used or have the machine shop extract the screw from the flywheel where it's all gonna pretty much be there anyway.

 

So far I have a whopping 50 greenbacks into the project plus the cost of a truck rental and fuel to travel the 140 ish miles roundtrip so it's not like I'm going bankrupt on this but naturally I'm curious to see what machine shops get for honing and bolt extractions.  

 

Will be ordering new gaskets, ignition points, carb and coil and may throw a coat of red paint on it (or just primer).

 

Anything else I'm missing?  Thoughts, complaints, grievances, questions or concerns? 

 

Have the best Monday you possibly can.

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jay bee

:popcorn:

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JAinVA

Machine shop cost for the flywheel will be based on setup time and machine time.Both together will be about an hour.Find out the hourly rate at the shop you use and go from there.

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Jaydubz83
10 minutes ago, JAinVA said:

Machine shop cost for the flywheel will be based on setup time and machine time.Both together will be about an hour.Find out the hourly rate at the shop you use and go from there.

Precisely what I was looking for. 

Much Obliged 👍👍

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ebinmaine

It's great to see you tearing into that project.

I'm not sure who to recommend for a machine shop because I only know of one in southern Maine and that's way down in Saco. Nasco machine

I've never had any work done by them but their reputation is very good and I've spoken to the Father and son. Seems like decent people.

 

As far as getting used parts off of eBay I don't mean to sound negative but I would try to avoid it. I really am not prone to buying anyting from an unknown source.

If you want used parts that one of us on Redsquare doesn't have, contact Lincoln at A to Z tractor in Pennsylvania.

He's very busy most of the year and can be a little tough to get a hold of but there's a good reason for that.

 

Not sure how far you got with the exhaust. There is a trick for that.

Get a sawzall with a fine metal blade and make a cut somewhere on the top half.

And you take a punch and a hammer and drive those pieces inward effectively breaking the bond of the threads.

 

As to the points, if the ones that are in there are just glazed over or very lightly pitted, clean them and reuse them. The older points are just better quality than the newer replacements.

 

Primer vs. Paint. Get some high heat red and PAINT it. A lot of us don't even use high heat. The only place on the engine that ever presents any problem is right around the muffler port.

 

if you're going to take the time to primer the engine you might as well get the paint and do it while you're there. Primer is not a good thing to leave on metal long-term.

 

 

I'll be looking forward to seeing your progress....

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JAinVA

If you don't already have one get a copy of Kohlers service manuals.I got a CD copy off E-bay and it covers any Kohler ever built.I understand Eric's concern over unknown sourses and buying from them but have had good luck getting parts from Joe's Outdoor Power Equipment. I believe he is a member here.The machining cost for your rebuild will be eye opening.if you need the block bored and the crank ground.Most machine shops want to fit the piston to the block so you will need a new one so they can  fit it.If the block you have does not need to be bored again based on the service manual you can get a hone to break the glaze yourself.

 

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ebinmaine
2 minutes ago, JAinVA said:

If the block you have does not need to be bored again based on the service manual you can get a hone to break the glaze yourself.

Good point there Jim.

If the measurements are in spec, don't bore.

 

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953 nut
5 hours ago, Jaydubz83 said:

Also, there are bolts that will need to be extracted from the flywheel as they stripped out trying to get the screen cover off the housing to finish cleaning out the engine.  I've seen a couple (flywheels) for sale for between 40 and 60 bucks on ebay but I wonder if it would be best (cost-wise) to buy one of them used or have the machine shop extract the screw from the flywheel where it's all gonna pretty much be there anyway.

Only your machine shop can tell you what they will charge. If you ask first they should be able to give you an estimate. If you decide to buy a used flywheel be sure it is correct for your engine, the Spec. # of your engine can be used to find the flywheel part number. Not all flywheels are the same.

Take the block and crankshaft to the machine shop so they can be measured, if a new piston and rod are needed the machine shop will let you know so you (or they) can order them.

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Jaydubz83
24 minutes ago, ebinmaine said:

Good point there Jim.

If the measurements are in spec, don't bore.

 

I'm not sure as though it needs to be bored.  My SME (subject matter expert) who helped w the tear down stated it needed to go in for honing and the have the bolts extracted as I don't have 200a service for a decent welder nor do I have the hands steady enough to weld if I did.  I tried drilling and tapping and extracting ( if I'm using the correct terminology here) but no dice and didn't want to make anything worse (small engines are virgin territory for me.... pardon the expression)

I have a micrometer (HF special) but watching videos on bore measurements it seems I don't have all the tools needed to get accurate results 

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Jaydubz83
Posted (edited)
37 minutes ago, JAinVA said:

If you don't already have one get a copy of Kohlers service manuals.I got a CD copy off E-bay and it covers any Kohler ever built.I understand Eric's concern over unknown sourses and buying from them but have had good luck getting parts from Joe's Outdoor Power Equipment. I believe he is a member here.The machining cost for your rebuild will be eye opening.if you need the block bored and the crank ground.Most machine shops want to fit the piston to the block so you will need a new one so they can  fit it.If the block you have does not need to be bored again based on the service manual you can get a hone to break the glaze yourself.

 

I printed out paper copies of the service manuals, IPLs and some rather cursory wiring diagrams from the manuals section here.  If there's something else kore beneficial by all means direct to where I need to go.

 

As far as J.O.P.E I dealt with him before and after deciding to go another way, returned the item (which was used to begin with) returned in original packaging, left positive feedback on both the purchase and return and much to my surprise only recd around 60% of the purchase price refunded.  He now seems to have me blocked from futire purchases even though returns were 100% accepted in the original listing so I'm good with future dealings with him.  40% restocking fee due to a used item being return in used condition seems a little unreasonable to me.

Edited by Jaydubz83

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Jaydubz83
36 minutes ago, ebinmaine said:

I can take a look for the hinge here.

 

That engine shaft size. The 10 horse has a 1". ?? Or are you doing something different?

 

Are you looking for a stock Wheelhorse pulley you can use with the PTO?

 

 

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JAinVA
Posted (edited)

Shaft diameter can be measured with a tape measure.You do realize that for the cost of a decent rebuild you can get a Predator 13HP from Harbor freight with a warranty.I have a number of 241 Kohlers that need rebuilds but since i can redo a 12,14 or 16 horse for the same price they will be parted out.

Edited by JAinVA
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richmondred01

I have a k241 on the stand right now.

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953 nut
12 hours ago, Jaydubz83 said:

I don't have all the tools needed to get accurate results 

I did this thread for that very reason. If the end gap readings are not consistent from top to bottom then you should have it measured at the machine shop.

 

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richmondred01

If you don’t have, and know how to use, these tools get a machinist to measure the cylinder, crank and valve guides.

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