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bcgold

Etching Metals

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bcgold

You can purchase ferric chloride or do as I'm doing, make your own.

 

I gathered up some iron scraps then torched them to remove any grease or oil, then added the bits into a liter of hydrochloric acid aka muriatic available at most paint, hardware stores and lumber yards.

 

Rusty iron is OK to use as the ferric solution gets filtered through a coffee filter before its used the first time.

 

Nurd Rage has a good video showing how to make ferric chloride.

 

I have a few small sheets of brass, my first project will be the logo shown below, after the brass has been through the first etch the part will be removed then thoroughly rinsed off.

 

Then I'll apply mask to the exposed parts, then reintroduce the brass back into the ferric, what I'm hoping to do is remove all the outside metal from the outside outline - leaving me with just the logo.

 

Once the etching is completed the mask is removed from all areas then paint is applied.

 

I'll be using gimp for the artwork and the laser printer to create the mask, an old clothing iron to transfer the mask onto the brass.

 

Ferric chloride works on copper, brass, steel and stainless steel.

 

cut.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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bcgold

 

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bcgold
32 minutes ago, CCW said:

This is pretty cool.  Disposal of ferric oxide could be a problem.  See the MSDS information on it.

https://art.illinois.edu/images/documents/MSDS/Metals/Ferric-Oxide.pdf

 

Ferric Chloride FAQ
The solution must not be put down the drain because of residual copper ions left in it. To make it safe for disposal, you can add sodium carbonate (washing soda) or sodium hydroxide to it to neutralize it, until the pH value goes up to between 7.0 and 8.0, testing it with indicator paper.

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8ntruck

That the same process used to make printed circuit boards?

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bcgold
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, 8ntruck said:

That the same process used to make printed circuit boards?

 

Yes it is.

 

I've been researching a product sold as photoresist manufactured as either a positive or negative. One tuber uses it to expose areas on glass that is sandblasted to create an image.

 

The photoresist is a nice product but requires way to many steps for my liking, I'm leaning towards using a liquid resist then a cheap Chinese laser to etch away the areas I want to chemically etch.

 

On side note for those who do not wish to work with Ferris Chloride, you can use plain old salt water with a battery or power supply. If you had access to a vinyl cutter you could turn out some really cool projects.

 

For instance if you had a vinyl stencil cut with your name, sand a part of your tractor free of paint then stick the stencil in place, wet the area you want to remove with salt water.

 

Connect the negative lead of you power supply the the part being etched, then with a small wire brush attached to the positive lead eventually your etching would require a desirable depth.

 

Or you could use the Ferris Chloride applied with a soft brush, the perfect way to mark your property with permanent identification.

 

 

 

Edited by bcgold

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bcgold

Glass chipping, using hide glue it would be easy to make a wheelhorse sign.

 

 

Edited by bcgold

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