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ebinmaine

What kind of tool do I need to remove the bearing from this Tecumseh crankshaft?

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ebinmaine

See the picture.

 

Also, the manual states I need to swap crank gears from one crank to another so that they match the camshaft gear. Is that actually important?

 

15685806161183852453911388256032.jpg.2b170c8d18b7d28e9e9d5d22bc4bb7e8.jpg

 

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The Tool Crib

Looks to me Eric you're gonna need a press to do this.  Do you have a local machine shop that you can take it 

to or maybe you have  access to one ?

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ebinmaine
2 minutes ago, The Tool Crib said:

local machine shop

Unfortunately no. The nearest one to me is about 50 minutes each Direction the wrong way in a place I rarely go.

 

Besides that.... Trina and I are just do-it-yourself type people. I'd rather buy a tool and figure out how to do most things than pay somebody else to do it.

 

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jabelman
7 minutes ago, ebinmaine said:

 

 

Besides that.... Trina and I are just do-it-yourself type people. I'd rather buy a tool and figure out how to do most things than pay somebody else to do it.

 

a hammer and a chisel!

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oliver2-44

While a press is ideal, if that bearing isn't too tight a fit, you may be able to walk it off with a nail bar something like this Bronx 15 Heavy Duty Flat Pry Bar, $4.99/sqft, Lumber Liquidators, Flooring Tools.  You want to work it between the gear and bearing and ideally put the force on the bearing race down at shaft, not the outer bearing race.  If possible slip a piece of sheet copper or thin sheet metal against the gear so you don't mess up the gear teeth.  just rock it back and forth in there, rotate rock, rotate, etc.  If it's snug you hay have to 'gently" drive the short end of the bar in the small space and use the long length as leverage to pry it away from the gear. 

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ZXT

What kind of clearance do you have between the bearing and crank gear? Last week when I had the transmission out of my Porsche 928 replacing the torque tube bearings, I ran into a similar issue when replacing the bearings on the torque converter carrier. I had just enough room to slide a lawn mower blade that had almost a half moon curve to it (which our blades don't have) on each side to support the bearing, then I pressed the shaft out of the bearing with my HF press. Worked well. 

 

You could also cut out a piece of metal plate to fit under the bearing rather than using what i suggested above, I just used blades because I had an old pair sitting on the shelf and they worked without modification. 

 

I'd suggest picking up a press. They're relatively inexpensive and are handy as can be. 

Edited by ZXT
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ebinmaine
1 hour ago, jabelman said:

a hammer and a chisel!

What size hammah??

 

:banana-wrench:

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OILUJ52

maybe bump both off a the same time. piece of hardwood and hammer alternating side to side. ????

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Achto
2 hours ago, ebinmaine said:

Also, the manual states I need to swap crank gears from one crank to another so that they match the camshaft gear. Is that actually important?

 

 

The easiest and best solution to this problem was manufactured by Kohler. :D

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ebinmaine
1 minute ago, Achto said:

 

The easiest and best solution to this problem was manufactured by Kohler. :D

Agreed.

 

But it ran good before I broke it so I'm hoping to get it back together....

 

If it don't go.... The Briggs just stays in place.

Or maybe a nice Kohler 12........?

 

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ZXT
1 hour ago, Achto said:

 

The easiest and best solution to this problem was manufactured by Kohler. :D

^ that! I pulled the Tecumseh off of mine because the starter died. That's all the reason I needed. I'd probably give the thing to somebody if they were close.

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Howie

One of those bearing separators in the link above will get it off. They can be purchased

separately, I use one with my harmonic balancer  puller. They need to be pulled off but

they are not super tight on there. 

To put back on put some oil in a container, heat it  up with bearing in there. Use a hot plate 

or something similar, hot bearing will slide right on. Will have to look, it seems like when a

little haze comes off of oil it is hot enough.

Been a while since I have had to do this.

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oliver2-44
1 hour ago, adsm08 said:

Harbor freight sells the identical set.  I've used mine several times with these tractors and motors, its handy and works good .

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Mike'sHorseBarn
11 hours ago, oliver2-44 said:

Harbor freight sells the identical set.  I've used mine several times with these tractors and motors, its handy and works good .

 

Same Here. It's a handy tool to have around.

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edgro

Cut the outer race off, then use an air hammer to walk the inner race off. Have used this method on truck parts with success many times

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ebinmaine
Just now, edgro said:

Cut the outer race off, then use an air hammer to walk the inner race off. Have used this method on truck parts with success many times

I've done that same thing in the distant past and it works great but I'm trying to save this one....

 

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The Tool Crib

Do you have an auto zone there. 

They have a tool like the one above

pay a deposit and get it back when you 

return it

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ebinmaine
2 minutes ago, The Tool Crib said:

Do you have an auto zone there. 

They have a tool like the one above

pay a deposit and get it back when you 

return it

Not as far out of the way as the machine shop but the same situation. There is one. But not super close.

 

I do however pass by a Napa and Advance Auto Parts every day. I wonder if they would have it?

 

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The Tool Crib
1 hour ago, ebinmaine said:

Not as far out of the way as the machine shop but the same situation. There is one. But not super close.

 

I do however pass by a Napa and Advance Auto Parts every day. I wonder if they would have it?

 

I would say they do to be competitive 

with others.! I dont think i would be pounding on a crank shaft wit a hammah!

:lol:

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ebinmaine
8 minutes ago, The Tool Crib said:

I would say they do to be competitive 

with others.! I dont think i would be pounding on a crank shaft wit a hammah!

:lol:

Performed with the correct amount of care and finesse I would have no issue pounding a crankshaft with a hammer. The whole issue here is... That is not what I did in the first place.

:D

 

This is the crankshaft that I broke the nose off of... With a hammer...

In my own meager and probably invalid defense I don't know that it wasn't already cracked.

 

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AHS

I have the keys to a machine shop up here in Bangor! It’s my fathers machine shop. And I know how to use a press.... till it snaps!👍

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pfrederi

Norm Abrams says a woodworker can never have too many clamps.  For those of us who work on tractors big and small you can  never have enough Bearing,  flange,  gear, etc pullers... Get the set above now and start your collection.  

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ebinmaine
1 hour ago, pfrederi said:

Norm Abrams says a woodworker can never have too many clamps.  For those of us who work on tractors big and small you can  never have enough Bearing,  flange,  gear, etc pullers... Get the set above now and start your collection.  

Wholeheartedly agreed Paul.

 

 

As a matter of fact, along that same line of thinking I ordered a set of micrometers last week.

Over the last couple of years I've had occasions where I wished I had micrometers up to 3 inches.

I want to get into engine building at some point.

Automatically that means I need up to 4 inches.

I found an inexpensive set that goes up to 6 inches and bought that.

 

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The Tool Crib
16 hours ago, pfrederi said:

Norm Abrams says a woodworker can never have too many clamps.  For those of us who work on tractors big and small you can  never have enough Bearing,  flange,  gear, etc pullers... Get the set above now and start your collection.  

 Norm speaks the truth I still don't have enough !

8F67FE52-F047-4B40-9CF8-5DF4F0AF2821.jpeg

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