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Firebug

I’ve been reading some threads where guys have installed wheel studs on their hubs. What is the process for doing that? Is there any special thuds that need to be used. I have a d 200 with separate dirt and snow tires. Both sets are loaded with washer fluid and changing them out is a bear

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pfrederi

Check out Bob in the vendor section he has them.  They make life a lot easier.  I even made up some of my own to fit my lawn ranger (smaller bolts/nuts.)

 

 

 

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953 nut

I have one of Bob's wheel studs on each axle of several of mine. Once you line up one stud and get a lug nut started it is much easier to get the lug bolts started in the rest of the holes. I had all five holes on the 418-C fitted with studs but when installing loaded tires with chains and weights (about 150 pounds each) it didn't help much.      :twocents-02cents:

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ebinmaine

I think that might be in contention for the best modification to be done.

I've put them in all the Horses we've built and will continue to do so.

I've bought a couple sets from Bob.

I needed to purchase a larger quantity for several to be switched over so I bought a bag of 100 of the bolts off flea bay and then a few sets of lug nuts.

 

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squonk
1 hour ago, 953 nut said:

I have one of Bob's wheel studs on each axle of several of mine. Once you line up one stud and get a lug nut started it is much easier to get the lug bolts started in the rest of the holes. I had all five holes on the 418-C fitted with studs but when installing loaded tires with chains and weights (about 150 pounds each) it didn't help much.      :twocents-02cents:

Rich, if you need to swap loaded tires like I do, get yourself one of those car moving dollies. I roll the tire up on the dolly, Jack up the tractor and roll the dolly towards the axle. I line up the studs and adjust the tractor height and roll the dolly all the way in and the tire is on. Super easy.

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Spareparts

I put studs on all my pullers, I went to Feldman's Farm Supply and got  some Grade 5 SAE bolts 7/16" with threads

all the way down. Installed from the back of the hub with Lock-tite on the last few threads. Got a box of lug nuts from the auto

parts store, buying by the box they were  only about $.30 each versus 5 in a blister pak for $4.00. Been working for 5 yrs with no problem

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bcgold

Using the threaded stud cut the head off then tapered the head to use as a locating stud, not my idea many of the older vehicles like Hudson, Studebaker and most early Chrysler products used this stud.

 

Place the locator at the 12:00 o'clock position the wheel finds its own centre of gravity, then after installing a few wheel studs to hold the rim and tire in place you can remove the locating pin and keep that stock look.

 

pin.png

Edited by bcgold

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cleat

You can make a locating pin or two from a couple of 7/16" fine thread bolts.

 

Kind of like this.

SGM103_z17bbb5ee694a46b7831751d175a4e399.png.1ecd9b2877956ed181f05a0b4a223d2b.png

 

Just cut the head off then cut in a little slot for a screwdriver if it gets stuck in.

 

I just did this when putting the wheels back on my Work Horse and it worked great. I used 2 pins then the 3 wheel bolts just easily threaded in, then remove the two pins and install the last 2 bolts.

 

All of my 520's have studs and nuts and they also work great.

 

Cleat

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