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Ok guys I have a question but I need to give some background. I have a 1 car garage & a shed full so my project the gt1800 while have to wait until summer (maybe). With that being said when I do get into tearing the horse down for rebuild I was wondering what some of you do with the hardware until you actually start putting it back together. Example hood bolts to hinge, hinge bolts to frame. My questions do you store them in the piece you take off or do you label a small bag and store them in a container of some type?

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The answer to that would be D, all of the above.

 

I have no idea who on this site or it was or I would be very happy to give them credit but somebody suggested to use old muffin tins at one point and I've been known to do that as well. Do not tell your significant other that you have stolen said muffin tins.

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I agree with 'all the above'. I save "TV" dinner containers, tin cans (Tuna), small boxes, etc and sorta scatter them around the work area and as I go along I'll start divvying up. I do - as much as possible - like to attach hardware to the part.

 

Course, invariably I come across the "where the hack did this go!" item/s

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Those white cream cheese containers, yogurt, cottage cheese containers, especially if they have a see-thru lid.  Sometimes, zip-top baggies.  I try to keep them with the part removed, and label them if I'm not sure I'll be putting it back together real soon. And take pictures before disassembly if it's complicated.  My memory isn't what it used to be. 

     Jim

Edited by SPINJIM
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Thanks guys. I do have a place to store parts until warm weather. Think if work settles down I can get it in the garage for a couple days and get it down to the frame. Store parts and label things then be ready for paint as soon as it warms up. Might try to sneak it in the basement to paint but not sure if I can get away with that. Definitely couldn't reassemble since there is no other way out except up the steps. And thru the dining room to the slider which only opens half the width I'd need. Going to play it by ear at this point.

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It is very important to take pictures from all angles also...from how the choke and throttle cables run...to how the belt guard is connected.  Especially linkage, springs, clips.  It all seems easy when you take it apart, but as time passes, the memory gets foggy.  :occasion-xmas:  I would even take notes of the order I took things apart...then reverse order to put back together. 

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This is a very good question posed by Whnewone!    First time I have seen this asked on Red Square Wheel Horse Forum!

 

I store parts from projects in motion (or  planned for an as yet unknown date)  in everything that can hold an item or two.   Cardboard boxes, five gallon plastic buckets,  gelato containers, plastic coffee cans,  storage containers with lids,  spice containers, open plasic storage bins,  Kraft cheese plastic containers,  etc.

 

 

Whatever works for you -just keep what you may need and what you have to have for your project!

 

A sampling of my part containers:

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Whnewone said:

do you store them in the piece

:text-yeahthat:whenever possible. the rest just get tossed in a box, especially if I am doing a frame up build. 95% of the time I will use new hardware anyway. My time is money so clean them up and ruse them I coulda bought new.  If I was to do a completely orginal resto I would bag and tag them.

 

Steve hit it with plenty of pics. IPLs are a good source of how it goes back and often gives bolt sizes/types.

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Also, having a IPL  Parts Manual List for your Wheel Horse tractor model is an almost essential item to have when redoing a tractor!

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Thanks guys it really helps since this will be my first completed rebuild I'm trying to get information and do the research. Then along with  making a list of parts or any items I need to replace all in order I can then concentrate on the rebuild without stopping to research and get info and delay the rebuild or do it wrong. I wanna make this as close to correct as possible and try my best to be as accurate as possible not to mention as not having to take a few steps back and redo something that could have been done right the first time.

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I have already downloaded any and all manuals I can find. With many thanks to Garry who has pointed me in that right direction. This sight has been just loaded with helpful "friends" that is more than willing to help again THANK YOU TO ALL WHO HAVE GIVEN ADVICE AND WHO WILLINGLY GIVE ME ADVICE. IM SO THANKFUL I FOUND ALL OF YOU.

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   I use any thing that comes to hand, tins, trays jars etc. Labelling as I go along. Also photo's. Though having similar models of tractors helps.

 

  Lane Rangers post reminds me of a handy tip if shelf space is in short supply. Screw the lids of coffee jars under shelving. Put whatever in the jar and screw into the lid.

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Well stormin now that you mention it Sunday I'm going to look at another gt1848 and it looks like it will be coming home with me:banana-rock: that will be number 2 bought and 3 in the stables! Another project in the works not to mention the plow, cultivator, and wagon I have bought and brought home earlier!!!!

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When i tore my Bronco 14 down, I would take off 1 part, and put all the hardware in a zip-lock bag, and label the bag. Then, I took all the bags, and put them into the tool-box that goes under the seat pan.


As other stated, pics are very important too. I took a lot of pictures during tear down.

 

I am working on rebuilding now, but having all the hardware labeled and bagged is a real big help (at least for me)

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I use egg containers for small nuts and bolts 

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We use zip-lock plastic bags and use a permanent marker to write what the bolts/nuts/washers are for.

Take many, many photos of everything, then take more photos.

When we were assembling my wife's Gilson, we looked at a lot of photos for reference. We found that often times, a photo of one item may also be beneficial for another part as it can be seen from a different angle.

As Lane said, a manual really helps when the time comes to assemble.

Did I mention to take a lot of photos?

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When you are taking pictures as it comes apart you will want to transfer those photos to a flash drive that ONLY has pictures of that job.

I use portable parts storage cases to keep track of replacement parts.  Image result for parts storage case

Bolts, nuts and washers have storage bins by size (when I take the time to sort them).      :hide:

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I must agree with ALL OF THE ABOVE. :text-yeahthat: I usually place back in what I can that won't get in my way while working, but also fill pill bottles (for small stuff), up to plastic coffee cans for the bigger stuff, and to plastic bins and cardboard boxes for the really big stuff. AND BE SURE TO LABEL THEM! The absolute best advice from the guys above, which can't be emphasized enough, TAKE LOTS OF PICTURES!!! From all angles, in all steps of disassembly. Unless it is just my old deteriorated brain cells, you would never believe what you can forget in the course of this project.

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Richard:  I forgot about the three tackle boxes I use for all the small  Wheel Horse hardware parts!

 

 

Stacked Up Just to the left of the Gelato plastic jars !

 

 

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4 hours ago, Lane Ranger said:

  Be careful when you lift that bottom jar on the left down. The lids not on properly. You could have nuts all over the floor. :rolleyes:

 

 

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18 hours ago, 953 nut said:

When you are taking pictures as it comes apart you will want to transfer those photos to a flash drive that ONLY has pictures of that job.

I use portable parts storage cases to keep track of replacement parts.  Image result for parts storage case

Bolts, nuts and washers have storage bins by size (when I take the time to sort them).      :hide:

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Is your "bolt bin" homemade or store bought?

I like it!

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54 minutes ago, KC9KAS said:

Is your "bolt bin" homemade or store bought?

I like it!

It is a factory made unit, I picked it up at a auto dealer bankruptcy auction about thirty years ago.

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I always put the fastener back in the one of holes it came out of during dismantling .

If they need to come out for painting / cleaning or whatever , I usually do that one item at a time so I just lay them in a magnetic bowl until the piece is done , then back in they go until reassembly time . 

 

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I get the “Plano” style boxes from harbor freight. I realize there’s a cost involved over the free options of tuna cans and such but they work for me. The dividers are adjustable to accommodate different size hardware and you can have up to 24 compartments per bin. I just mark each compartment with a pice of electrical tape and sharpie marker. Doing this has really cleaned up my work area and resulted in a lot less lost parts. The 2 pictured are for my 314-8 and one is just misc hardware I’ve accumulated. 

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For disassembled parts from a tractor I use the Heavy Duty Freezer plastic bags. They have the white area one them thay you can write on with a Sharpie marker or good ball point pen.  The bags in quart, gallon are great for various size parts.  A bonus is they don't spill out if your like me and prone to knock the muffin tins off the shelf ans spill everything.  Some larger grocery stores also carry a freezer bag bigger than the one gallon. 

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