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Bill D

Air Compressor

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I plan to buy an old Wayne Air compressor from my neighbor.  The model number on the pump is 6228-SV, it has a 5 HP motor and 80 gallon tank.  Does anyone here have one like this?

 

   Bill

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I remember having a Wayne air compressor in our service station in the '60s and they were tough, well built and reliable. Your money will be well spent on an older compressor rather than the cheap Chinese crap they are selling today.

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I am paying $250 for it.  It hasn't had much use over the last 10 years or so.  I plan to look in the tank with a scope to make sure it isn't badly rusted and dangerous once I get it home.  The tank is dry and a mechanic I know used to rent the shop from the previous owner.  I do know he serviced the compressor and drained the tank on a regular basis.  Anyone here work on air compressors?  I have been able to find very little online about this machine and would like some more info.  Thanks.

 

Bill 

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I agree with 953,those old Wayne compressors were bombproof, a good thorough lubrication refresh, will keep it happy, and give you a good base line on service, Pete

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Well I got the air compressor home in three pieces.  Initial inspection of the tank shows more rust than expected.  I still have to remove the 2 large plugs to get a better look inside.  I may spring for a new tank just to be on the safe side.  Any thoughts on tank options?  This thing is a monster.  5 HP, 1750 RPM AJAX motor with cast iron end bells.  The motor alone must weight 150lbs.  The pump probably weighs about the same.

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If your compressor looks similar it has a pressurized oil system, the oil line coming from the rear of the oil pump operates the un-loader valve in the cylinder head.

 

I have an old Quincey with the same set up.

 

Your Wayne looks like its a two stage with a working pressure of 175 lbs, most air tools only require 90/100 psi. Do a hydro-static test on the tank fill it up completely with water then pressure it up to 175 psi possibly even 200 psi. If you need to go higher and old refrigeration compressor will go as high as 500 psi.

 

There should be data available fro the hydro test, pressure required etc along with measurements if your unable to find anything online contact one of the many tank manufactures  like Manchester

 

http://www.mantank.com/products/

Products

Manchester Tank is a global leader in the design and manufacture of steel and aluminum pressure vessels. We produce a broad range of products for the storage and transport of propane, chemicals, compressed air and other industrial applications. Manchester Tank’s Department of Transportation (DOT) approved steel and aluminum cylinders range from 1 to 420 pounds and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) approved steel tanks range in size from 1 to 30,000 gallons. Today the company is focused on the sale and manufacture of approximately 30 product families that are used in commercial, residential and industrial markets.

 

https://i.postimg.cc/0Nb7zfw6/wayne.png

 

This fellow used his pressure washer for the hydro test.

https://youtu.be/qajNYANHISM

 

If you want the tank re-certified find someone local that does SCUBA tanks to do the hydro test.

 

Not sure why my links are only embedded rather than showing image and video.

 

 

Edited by bcgold

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That Wayne compressor in the picture looks exactly like the one I have.  I am thinking replacing the old 80 vertical tank with a new 60 gallon horizontal tank.  This would make for a less top heavy compressor that could be mounted on wheels and moved around my garage if needed.  It would save me some time with regards to tank inspection and repair of the feet as they are rusted from sitting directly on concrete for the last 40 years or so.  I plan to  install a new pressure switch with a 125 psi cutoff and 90 psi cut in.  I also plan change over to synthetic oil.  Royal Purple makes synthetic compressor oil.

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A new tank will probable not be near as heavy as the old tank.  of course what your rightfully concerned about is thin pitted spots in the tank.  As indicated above, many industrial compressor shops can test the tank.   Since that is a probable a 175psi compressor check the relief valve, a new one is not very expensive.

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35 minutes ago, Bill D said:

That Wayne compressor in the picture looks exactly like the one I have.  I am thinking replacing the old 80 vertical tank with a new 60 gallon horizontal tank.  This would make for a less top heavy compressor that could be mounted on wheels and moved around my garage if needed.  It would save me some time with regards to tank inspection and repair of the feet as they are rusted from sitting directly on concrete for the last 40 years or so.  I plan to  install a new pressure switch with a 125 psi cutoff and 90 psi cut in.  I also plan change over to synthetic oil.  Royal Purple makes synthetic compressor oil.

 

 

Suggest you set your high limit at 150/170 psi then use a regulator on the supply line set at 90 psi, this will give the compressor time to cool between cycles. Pressure switches made today are imo junk but you can get around this by installing a magnetic motor start switch which has larger contacts.

 

You mentioned your motor has large cast iron end bells, is it a repulsion' induction motor if so it will have brushes similar to the one below. You couldn't ask for a better compressor motor as these have tremendous starting torque and will out last any modern day induction motor.

 

No capacitors used on the repulsion motor, brushes make armature contact during start then retract once operating speed is achieved heavy copper windings and well insulated.

 

Mag, mag.png

rep.png

Edited by bcgold

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The motor has two starting capacitors and the machine came with a magnetic starter.   I would love to have a large repulsion start motor, the only one I have is a 1/4 hp century.  Neat motor though.  I spoke to a tech from Pacific Air Compressors that it is a good idea to make sure the compressor runs enough to get hot and burn off any possible moisture accumulation in the pump, hence my reason for the 90-125 psi switch and smaller 60 gallon tank.  I mainly run small air tools but am looking to purchase a small sandblaster cabinet to clean small parts.   The unloader is a centrifical unloader and there is a line that goes from the unloader housing to the intake, not sure why, but I think it may be a breather for the crank case.

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