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pullstart

Allis D-14 value?

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I found an AC D-14 with a backhoe, bucket and forks.  I need to dig a pond and have nothing to dig with.  I feel like a loader/hoe is the most versatile tool for the job.

 

any insight on what something like this would be worth?  It has had recent head work and runs good.  There are some small leaks, nothing I couldn’t fix.

 

It’s been stored inside and comes with manuals.

 

 

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According to Machinery Pete the value of the tractor alone would be $ 3,000 to $ 4,000. One thing is sure, once you finish your project it wouldn't be too hard to sell, may even make a little money if you can buy it right.

:wwp:

https://www.machinerypete.com/listings/tractors/under-40-hp/allis-chalmers/d14

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That helps a ton Richard, thanks!  I normally use some of my snow plow income to build my machinery base and invest in something that would deem useful around the house or on potential job sites.  When checks roll in and cover my expenses, I might just look this guy up for a test drive...

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Are you sure you wouldn't need an excavator for digging a pond?  I'm mostly familiar with a JD 310 and 510s and it'd be slow, slow digging a pond with them!  Do you have a dozer at all?

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I don’t have any real digging equipment, just a dump truck and dump trailer.  I am not worried about the time it will take, if it’s a versitile tool all around.  I’ll be able to dig and scoop with one piece of equipment, and I don’t mind a little site prep making a safe trail into the bottom of the hole.  My goal is to have open water year round, but maybe dig during dry or frozen season to prevent sinking too much.

 

As you can see, I have no elevation change in my property, so water chooses to fill my sump crock all the time.  The pump never quits running through the year, sometimes it is only “off cycle” for 30 seconds before the crock is full.

 

 

 

 

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:woohoo:      That is a serious bucket on the backhoe. You can move a lot of fill without even moving, just fill the dump truck and transfer the load.

5 hours ago, pullstart said:

water chooses to fill my sump crock all the time.

Sounds like you may have a spring near by. If you can divert it to the pond you will have good fresh water to stock with fish. May even want to make a sand beach for the girls.

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I was thinking about stocking it.  I am not sure if it’s a spring, or the fact that all the surrounding fields have been tiled towards me.  Ideally in the long run, I’d build a windmill with a water pump to keep the water open year round for some tilapia or the like.  My Aunt and Uncle had a stocked pond when I was growing up, just a Honda 110 three wheeler ride away.  Good times, it wasn’t fishin’ it was catchin’!

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D-15s are a good machine. We had a d-15 and a d-19 when I was younger on the farm. Both were pretty tough. Pulled a lot of tree stumps with the d-15.

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Talk to @ACman Kev.  His family was in the AC business for many years and he would be a good source of information and might even have a few good leads on good deals for you.

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Ok, now on to another question, or comparison?  A 1953 Ford NAA came up too, with a backhoe and loader bucket.  It hasn’t run in 2 years, but is about half the asking price.  “Ran fine when parked”.  I imagine I could breath life into it, is it of any comparison with the AC.

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2 minutes ago, pullstart said:

 It hasn’t run in 2 years,

I would be skeptical of anything I can't drive unless it is nearly free. The 8N is a great light weight tractor but like any other tractor the maintenance (or lack thereof) is key. Most of them were gas engines and parts are easy to come by. You could take a battery and starter fluid with you to see if it will at least try to run. If it is a diesel the fuel system could cost a small fortune to get right. Lots of hydraulic hoses that may become a problem when pressure is applied.  Don't know about this. You are a good enough mechanic to figure it out.

 

“Ran fine when parked”  They always say that!    :ychain:     Is that why it hasn't been used in two years?             :scared-yipes:

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Looking at tractordata, they are comparable size and power wise, and it’s much more affordable!  I sent the owner a few questions... we’ll see!

 

 

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I agree with the loader/backhoe being a good versatile choice.

 

On 11/8/2018 at 1:51 PM, pullstart said:

thinking about stocking it

Please be careful here.

Birds and other animals can and will move babies or eggs from your pond to another and wreak havoc on surrounding ecosystems.

It may be better to stick with local native species.

Check with your local authorities as to what live fish are legal for an outside water.

Here in Maine they are extremely strict about enforcement of the fisheries rules and regulations and they definitely do apply to private waters.

 

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4 hours ago, 1995 520H+96+97 said:

The NAA is going to be difficult to get on and off. 9N or 2N front wheel

 

I was wondering where the “point of access” was...  I don’t understand that last sentence?

 

1 hour ago, ebinmaine said:

I agree with the loader/backhoe being a good versatile choice.

 

Please be careful here.

Birds and other animals can and will move babies or eggs from your pond to another and wreak havoc on surrounding ecosystems.

It may be better to stick with local native species.

Check with your local authorities as to what live fish are legal for an outside water.

Here in Maine they are extremely strict about enforcement of the fisheries rules and regulations and they definitely do apply to private waters.

 

 

Good point about species selection, I’ll be sure to take up to local authorities when the time comes!  Right now we’re talking pipe dreams...

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9N or 2N  are Ford tractors built 1939 to 1947. Naa came with different hub and wheel.

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Looks like a mid '50s Ford Jubilee, that is when they went from the flathead to overhead valves. Is the back hoe a home made unit?  Front end loader is probably a factory unit, I've seen them before and they always looked light duty to me, but they work and have held up well. They have a six volt positive ground electrical system, but you can use a twelve volt Chevy one wire alternator and twelve volt negative ground in place of the generator. The starter will turn in the correct direction, just a bit more briskly. I think I would want to attempt to get it running before pulling the trigger.

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