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After weeks of mowing wet grass, this is what I found under the RD.

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Tuned up the blades while I had the deck off.

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I like your tune up method!

 

Way less hassle for a simple dimple and burr removal mid season!

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Even worse on recycler's but I wouldn't trade it for anything! 

 

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hi ed, that first picture says it all, after scraping mine down, leaving it on the same bottoms up angle to the sun , I spray mine down with chain and cable fluid, it soaks into the warm metal  and STOPS CORROSION . I do that every time I drop and inspect the deck , also do it after cutting season. clean it down , grease and inspect ,sharpen blades / belts, and oil spray it down and leave it upside down over winter. what a concept, imagine stopping corrosion with an oil soak , the deck has no crud under it for months, and its totally soaking in the lubrication. my decks are over 30 years old with  regular cleaning and oil soaking the bottom, thanks for the good pictures and the opportunity to share my similar maintenance ritual , pete 

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Grass clippings are highly acidic and will eat up the deck shell in a short time.  Decks should be flushed out simply with garden hose to reduce the corroding effect of the grass.  What's more, the clippings are even WORSE on the pot-metal spindle housings.  

   

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5 hours ago, daveoman1966 said:

Grass clippings are highly acidic and will eat up the deck shell in a short time.  Decks should be flushed out simply with garden hose to reduce the corroding effect of the grass.  What's more, the clippings are even WORSE on the pot-metal spindle housings.  

   

I am always amazed when I find  these pot metal spindle housings with one side completely missing.  It seems there is a pattern to the missing metal.  In addition to the chemical corrosion due to the acidic grass, could there be some kind of erosion caused by the spinning blades?     Cavitation, Electrostatic, Galvanic

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The cast aluminum housings are highly prone to electrolysis, especially when you introduce wet grass and it's acids. I have yet to find a way to stop them from corroding into nothing, not even blasting them dead clean and using an aircraft etching primer and stainless steel paint has worked. One idea I've tossed around is an epoxy finish - that might seal them enough to stop the reaction. Spinning metal shaft mounted in a cast aluminum housing, along with a steel deck is a recipe for a problem, WH is not the only one with this issue either.

 

Sarge

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I coated the underside with Eastwoods ceramic engine paint...the AMC blue you see in this pict. 

Got two seasons out of this application, before my last cleaning revealed it needed to be done again.

:confusion-shrug: Looks like it did a pretty good job of slowing down the spindle decay.  

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Posted (edited)

My decks off every fall. Then up on a platform, cleaned ‘n painted. Blades sharp, new belt if needed. All my hardware 316 SS & Never-Seez.

 

Use Huskee Kevlar belts, green = oil resistant. Off the shelf at Tractor Supply. :handgestures-thumbupright:

 

Have seen too many spindle housings gone from corrosion. :-(

Edited by Tankman
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