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Keeping Connectors from Corroding

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OK! How does the forum group keep their electrical connector internals from corroding? (This would be real helpful for all you 520/518 & 416 owners). I have one of my tractors in a relatives garage with NO ventilation. NONE! The building with it's dirt floor feels like the deep south on hot days and suffers wild temp and humidity swings.

I had the connectors on the 417 corrode to the point the battery died. It wasn't charging. At WOT the battery terminals on my VOM read 11.29 VDC. I opened the connectors up, cleaned them up with contact cleaner and a small old points file and put them back together and I was back to just shy of 14 volts charging. They looked pretty bad but I know they were OK at the end of Fall last year and when it was stored in my better insulated garage.

I was going to smear the cleaned connector pins with dielectric grease and put them back together but I wanted to hear what you guys think. 

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Dielectric grease, and I'm not stingy with it....

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I use the dielectric grease on all my connectors except for the battery. 

It works great for me. If you pull most external  automobile plug in connectors you'll see  dielectric  grease in them.

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My vote is for dielectric grease also! 

 

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Enough response for me! I'm lubing them up tonight!

Thanks!

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What they said. 

Fill all gaps first and then connect. 

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when ever storing tractors on bear ground you should be on plywood it helps with dampness coming up from the ground put plywood down even outside cement floor 

 

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I use a product called No-Ox, it's used by satellite and phone companies to prevent corrosion on connections inside of those pedestals you see along the road. Very tough to get your hands on it, but I've never had anything corrode again once the parts are coated with this stuff. 

 

Sarge

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12 minutes ago, Sarge said:

I use a product called No-Ox, it's used by satellite and phone companies to prevent corrosion on connections inside of those pedestals you see along the road. Very tough to get your hands on it, but I've never had anything corrode again once the parts are coated with this stuff. 

 

Sarge

if it's the same stuff it's called "noalox" made by ideal,  you can get a lowes or depot in the electric dept

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No, this is a communications-specific product - the company that makes it is in Chicago, I need to spend some more time getting in touch with them and trying to source some of it in these little tubs, love the stuff but I'm getting pretty low from the original score from a splicer that worked for AT&T. He said the stuff was in nearly every pedestal they used in/around the cell towers as well as their satellite link boxes - they kept those pedestals stocked with it when wiring had to be replaced or modified. 

 

Sarge

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is this it? Amazon carries it.

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Also in small tubs

 

 

Capture.JPG

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Well, I'll be dipped in dielectric grease, and here I about gave up trying to find the stuff - excellent find, guys !

 

When I do any splices on terminals, the wire gets crimped properly, then soldered. While the terminal is still quite hot, it's dipped into the No-Ox just enough to coat the mechanical connection part of the terminal, then the shrink boot is put over the barrel part and heated to set it down and allow the adhesive to flow out. I've always used this process on race cars, heavy equipment, semi trucks and my offroad truck builds - never had a terminal rot out since.

 

Added the two tub deal to my list, thanks again guys....

 

Sarge

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