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Hi all

 

I am in UK with a

Westwood (Ariens IIAC) garden tractor with K46 transmission. Had it since new (2010), 250 hours all mowing work, Transmission getting less and less power and now will hardly move up a very slight slope.

Some people say change the oil for thicker grade but others say waste of time. No drain plug on this thing so would have to take it out and tip upside down to do it properly. I have an engine oil removal electric pump that goes down the dipstick hole in a car but would that be a waste of time, obviously won't get it all out? Looking online I think I may be finding a lot of metal swarf in there.

There is a Westwood dealer in UK who sells some new parts for the K46 but I have no idea what I need. What is the issue with these that causes this problem?

I have good mechanical skills and a very comprehensive tool kit so doing the work shouldn't be a problem, just need so pointers as to what I should be looking for

Thanks

Keith 

Now this is out of action after the first cut of the season it's just as well I have my 73 Raider 12 with 42" deck.............

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I have a John Deere with a K46. I am having the same problem. First thing I did was to remove the transmission and drain the oil. I replaced it with 5w50 full synthetic as recommended. No difference. So I ordered a new pump, motor, and filter. Took the transmission apart and replaced those items. No difference again. I contacted Tuff Torq and told them of my issues. They said that I may have a problem as simple as a slipping drive belt. You'd think that I may have noticed that, but I am going to check the belt this weekend. Good luck with yours.

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1 hour ago, Keith of kent said:

this is out of action after the first cut of the season it's just as well I have my 73 Raider 12 with 42" deck

Thankfully you have a dependable vintage :wh: to use. If it were mine I would find a new home for the Westwood and buy another :wh:. Hope you find a solution the isn't too expensive. 

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1 hour ago, 953 nut said:

 I would find a new home for the Westwood

I3645472939_918621d615_z.jpg?zz=1      This is the "Retirement Home" for most of these 10 year old lawn mowers.

   I would look for another Raider....One of the best Wheel Horse tractors made.

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Hi,

I already put a new transmission belt on over the winter. The degree of the problem has not changed as a result of that.

I tried it again today and from cold its not too bad. So thinking about sucking the oil out and filling with 5/50 fully synthetic which I have so just a bit of time.

I use the Westwood for  mowing my lawns (about 2 acres), because it is unique in that it has a PTO driven sweeper and a roller it leaves a nice striped effect on the lawn which we like. It collects the leaves in the fall very effectively. I also have a Westwood scarifier which is PTO driven. Its got a Kawasaki FS481V 16hp twin (built in the USA !) One I'd replaced the ridiculous Chinese bearings which disintegrated in the first two years it has been fine until this. 

The Raider 12 is used for mowing 2 acres of field that's a bit bumpy and would destroy the Westwood. Its a worker and also tows a large heavy roller, a large trailer full of logs or ton bags of sand etc etc etc. I even towed the root stump of a 60' Eucalyptus about 100 yards with it.

This machine is so fantastic, but; it doesn't collect grass and stripe the lawn

Occasionally they both are used to entertain the grandchildren!

 

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I found that there is no way to get the oil out without removing the transmission, taking the cap off the top, turning it up side down and letting it drain. It's not like an engine where all the oil drains back to the bottom. There are many areas where the oil sits that cannot be reached with a pump.

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Okay, just a followup to my last post about the K46. I found a YouTube video that said to adjust the forward pedal (loosen the nut and bolt and raise the pedal). That causes the forward/reverse lever on the transmission to move further in the forward direction giving me more forward speed. :)

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Today sucked all I could out. Filled with 5/50 fully synthetic. Drove it for 20 mins and almost completely lost drive. Sucked it out again this time added Wynns Charge to the oil(well, I had it and it's thick as hell and I used to sell the stuff in the 70's so I believe in it).

Sadly the result was the same. Now looking at new transmissions and having a beer. £490 plus pint of beer 60p

May need another beer to drink to the Wheelhorse

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Just to update. Ordered new transmission on Tuesday morning which arrived 24 hours later.

Five hours work today , took the old one out and installed the new one, now all up and running.

Not difficult to remove the old one or install the new one. What took a lot of time was getting the hubs off the shafts but more especially removing the collar spacers that sit inboard of the hubs. I cleaned up the shafts with an abrasive disc and then used heat, a size 10 hammer, big tyre levers, penetrating fluid. Finally when I used lots of foul language the little blighters came off. Fitted them and the hubs using copper grease in case I ever have to remove them again.

If I am correct Tuff Torque is from the USA. It's difficult to understand how we got  this from the great nation that made the Wheelhorse!

I suppose that's progress

 

Put the tools away and though I'd cut some grass. Wrong!  Massive hail storm. Never mind, nearly time for a beer!

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Sad to say, there are too many things made in the USA and all parts of the world, that aren't designed to last. Some US manufacturers -- Wheel Horse being one of them -- were legendary for building long-lasting, repairable designs, and built a lot of good faith around "made in USA". But "planned obsolescence" originated with American companies, too, so the US is part of the problem. Nowadays, it's all about profits anywhere you go. Consume, dispose of, and consume some more is the order of the day. In manufacturing, if it costs a fraction of a penny less to use a less-durable component or material, they will -- because the savings add up over millions of parts. If the part fails in five years instead of ten or more, they don't care. Consumers will just throw it away and buy a new one -- which is an opportunity for more profits.

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The Tuff Torq K46 is actually a well-made transmission except for the lack of ability to maintain it. The problem is that it is designed for a lightweight mower/tractor. Too many manufactures cheapen their products by putting in a transmission that won't hold up under heavy usage. I have abused mine by using my tractor to pull a heavy Cyclone Rake each fall. I am surprised that it is still working, but it is. If Tuff Torq would have put a drain in the bottom, and allowed the oil to be drained and replaced regularly, I think the K46 could last a long time.

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Is the casing thick enough to drill and tap for a drain plug, when the transmission is out?

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If you Google TuffTorque K46 drain plug you will find pictures of a “boss” or thicker spot in the casting that the manufacture says can be drilled and tapped for a drain plugg

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Problem is, there are magnets in various places inside the case to catch steel that wears off the differential gears, and the filter cannot be replaced without opening it up. It's not a difficult job if you want to take the time to do it right.

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