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BOB ELLISON

unleaded gas

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22 hours ago, BOB ELLISON said:

I tried to start my b80 and nothing.

So I charged the battery and it turned over and over and over. So I put fresh gas with sea foam  and no start.

Checked spark and good spark.

I decided to check fuel pump and got a good stream of gas. So I know now its

In the carburetor.  I shot some starting fluid it carb and it started up.I decided to pull carb and this is what I found.

This is from only 5 months sitting.

Now it has stabil and sea foam in the tank. This unleaded gas is bad news for sitting engines.imageproxy.php?img=&key=233175c88be08e9b

 

 

20171025_141547.jpg

20171025_141533.jpg

Substances like that sitting in a bowl are the reason why I am not allowed to try to cook

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Save the E-15 for the green ones! 

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I've never used the Seafoam product, picked up the can, or read the label. What is it's intended purpose? The product I've been using is Lucas Flex Fuel Ethanol Fuel Conditioner with stabilizers. I use this in all my Kohler, Tecumseh and hobby car engines. In my neck of the woods we have to store for maybe 4 to 5 months of the year. It gets cold here too, sometimes into the minus digits. Perhaps I've just been lucky?

 

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9 minutes ago, 1940willys said:

Perhaps I've just been lucky?

Me too... similar cold climate. I've been draining all small engines when not in seasonal use and getting them professionally tuned once a year .

Ok so far....

But I did switch to pure gas this past summer.

 

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7 minutes ago, ebinmaine said:

Me too... similar cold climate. I've been draining all small engines when not in seasonal use and getting them professionally tuned once a year .

Ok so far....

But I did switch to pure gas this past summer.

 

You will be amazed at the amount of maintenance the ethanol free gas will save you.

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9 minutes ago, 1940willys said:

I've never used the Seafoam product, picked up the can, or read the label.

 

Reading the label doesn't tell you the ingredients, so here goes.

According to the MSDS sheet, Seafoam contains the following:

Pale Oil 60% (Pale oil is straight naphthenic mineral oil)
Naphtha 25% (Same as mineral spirits paint thinner, only evaporates faster)
IPA 15% Isopropanol (Isopropyl alcohol)

 

So in my humble opinion, I see nothing in those ingredients that would lead me to believe that adding this to my gas would have any positive effects, other than the isopropanol which is the sole ingredient in gas line anti-freeze. And if I wanted to remove water from my gas, I'd use 100% isopropanol instead of something that contains only 15%.

 

However, if you think it works for you, go for it. :handgestures-thumbupright: 

 

For price of a gallon of Seafoam, I can buy about 20 gallon of ethanol-free gas.

 

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The voice of reason is the person who tries to get the group to adopt decisions using evidence and logic.

That person's role is either to be ignored by the emotional members of the group or to be cast out by the mob.

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25 minutes ago, Molon_Labe said:

You will be amazed at the amount of maintenance the ethanol free gas will save you.

That's part of what I'm hoping for,  along with keeping my older (antique) engines in better condition longer. 

I do ok at replacing parts but the fine adjustments are sometimes tough to get just right. 

 

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2 minutes ago, 1940willys said:

So... is there a MSDS sheet for the Lucas product I'm using?

Go to their website, find the product you are looking for, and there should be a link to the safety data sheet.

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4 minutes ago, 1940willys said:

So... is there a MSDS sheet for the Lucas product I'm using?

If I'm not mistaken - ALL chemicals have MSDS sheets.

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Gleaned these documents from a vintage motorcycle forum to which I belong.

More interesting stuff.

 

_Ethanol -- The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly.pdf

 

_Ethanol and Gasoline.pdf

 

The definitive list of stations that sell pure, ethanol-free gasoline in the U.S. and Canada

https://www.pure-gas.org/

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I guess I'll throw my :twocents-02cents: in here, I always buy high test 93 octane gas at Giant Grocery stores, so I'm sure it's not the highest quality gas out there, I add stay-bil before I fill my cans. My gas is usually at least 3 months old before I ever put it in a tractor. I just put gas in a tractor today that I bought 7/31/17. Then some of the tractors sit around for almost a year or more before it gets run out. I never fill the tanks on the show tractors that only get run a couple of times a year. But my point is I have not had any problems with this method. the 93 octane gas has more additives in then regular gas. Do I believe that ethanol free gas is better ? yes I do but we get $0.10 per gallon for every hundred $ we spend on groceries and can save discount up for 2 months. One time we actually got gas for free. so this is why my gas can be several months old before I ever use it. I try to keep 10 to 15 gallons of gas on hand at all times because I can go through 5 gallons in a little bit of no time with as many tractors as I have, and no don't ask how many I don't want to count or know for sure my self becuase I don't have a problem everybody else that don't collect tractors do have a problem :ROTF:

3 hours ago, rmaynard said:

However, if you think it works for you, go for it. :handgestures-thumbupright: 

 

I will repeat what rmanynard said if it works for you then go for it, my method works for me so I will keep using it

 

 

 

eric j   

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I've used the same fuel for the last 7yrs - Phillips 66 - 91 octane non-ethanol . The old gas in the 1277 , which has been parked since last summer (broken transmission mount plate) - started that engine right up yesterday without an issue . I let it run for 45 minutes at half throttle to help clear out any moisture in the oil . The only thing I use is the standard dose of Sta-Bil to help preserve the fuel , that's it . I have used Sea Foam but I only use it as a cleaner in carbs that are semi-gummed up or have issues from ethanol use (other people's junk) . The fuel in the old Land Cruiser is the same batch from spring of last year - it runs like a watch and starts easily .

 

I'm bummed right now as that station has closed to make way for a bigger/newer one with a full convenience store - praying they keep it as a Phillips 66 and not something else that sells ethanol-only fuel . Pay attention to what is going on in our Government - there is a huge push by the ag and ethanol lobby to increase the ratio to 15% content limit versus the current 10% limit across the board . If they get that done , our old engines are screwed as with that ratio there is no additive to remove the effects of the corrosive corn ethanol . There are several entities fighting it , but they are not nearly as big as ag and ethanol industry lobby - hoping it's not a losing battle .

 

Sarge

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I have read that most major car manufacturers will not honor the current warranties if 15% ethanol is used in their vehicles. That sends a powerful message to consumers regarding the negative properties of ethanol.

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Go talk to any motorsports dealer about engine warranties and fuel quality - you'll get an earful really quick . I know of 6 different manufacturers that will not warranty against ethanol damage to small engines - it happens more often than they care to admit .

We need some real hard looks at how the lobby system works within our Government - they are doing some real damage .

 

Sarge

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Sarge,

You might take a quick look at the pure-gas.org site for the Illinois listing.

Might be another ethanol free outlet fairly close to you which you aren't aware of.

Just a suggestion.

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21 hours ago, rmaynard said:

For price of a gallon of Seafoam, I can buy about 20 gallon of ethanol-free gas.

The problem with that for me is:  it is a 70 mile round trip to get ethanol free gasoline....so , seafoam it is.. I did use aviation fuel in my 1955 Stude tho...-costly -

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I check the puregas web site often - the corn lobby has pushed Iowa and Illinois so hard there are very few stations left that carry the non-ethanol . I know so many folks getting sick of small engine failures and expensive repairs but most don't know why it's happening . I'm sort of a one-man-campaign against the stuff around here . I'll spend the time to explain to anyone I see at a gas station filling cans for small engine use - especially 2-stroke and older equipment . Most times they are pretty surprised when I point out the little sticker missing that says "UP TO 10% ETHANOL ADDED" on the pumps and that is why their engines won't start every spring - most will admit how many mowers/equipment they've replaced for carb failures too , lol . If I have any of the WH tractors on the trailer - then it gets interesting as there is a ton of Deere and Cub collectors in this area . Most of my stuff is old and is still using their original engine after 40+yrs - they want to know how and why ...my equipment never sees ethanol and I take good care of it .

 

Sarge

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I just bought a 520H last week, starts and runs fine, idled nicely and has no issues. So this weekend I do an oil change and get some Shell V-power premium gas to fill it up. Start her up and now I've got a surging engine, at idle and under power...damn. So I figure I'd backtrack...drained the fuel, got some regular gas and put half a tank in, start her up....surge gone. What's going on here? Is it just coincidence that maybe some dirt got loose? Has running Premium gas ever changed the carb behaviour for anyone? I think now I will get some Sea Foam and run it with the regular gas for a while and then switch back to the V-power stuff and see if it's cleared. Suggestion anyone? BTW....very happy to find this forum, such a valuable resource to getting to know these old machines.

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On 10/25/2017 at 5:52 PM, squonk said:

...And be careful with Sta-Bil. I have seen that crystallize  also.

Roger that. Before using e-free gas, I would mix the proper amount of Sta-Bil with the gas. In the spring when the engines wouldn't start, I dropped the bowls and found a gummy mess. Have never used the stuff again. As far as Seafoam, most of you know my opinion on that.

 

33 minutes ago, Kukakunga said:

 Suggestion anyone?

No suggestions, but the owners manual for my V-twin engine in my John Deere suggests using 87 octane gas.

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:WRS: @Kukakunga

The surging issue on 520s is well know and documented here. We pretty much nailed it down to dirty or misadjusted carbs. Sounds like you may have had a coincidence going on there.

I've always had good luck with v-power in any of my engines.

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My :twocents-02cents: on this.

 

Here in Denmark you can no longer find E free gas.

 

After numerous Aaaarrrrghhh moments, I tried this, and have had no problems ever since.

 

0.5% two stroke oil in the mix.

 

I have no idea if there is any science behind it or if it is just lady luck, but for the last 3 years I have not seen gunk, or had any fuel related issues. I got the idea when I went to use my chainsaw, that had been sitting for years unused, undrained, and gassed up. It just fired up and ran without issue. Took the carb apart to see, because I was sure it had to be a fluke that it started, but the carb was clean.

 

Now I know the 2 stroke oil fouls a bit in the engine, but the way I look at it, it will help bring back some of that lubrication that the E gas takes away. Yes that's right. The ethanol in the E gas is suspected of washing the oil film off the cylinder wall, more so than gas. I have a sneaky suspicion that has a role in this whole story too.

 

The 2 stroke oil I use is Stihl labeled. Do not know if there is anything special about that. Haven't bothered to investigate it.

 

Anyways, it is not  science, not even proved right. Just what I see, and there might be other factors that is not accounted for in this also. But, It wont hurt the engine, rather the opposite, so why not give it a try? Perhaps we can get it confirmed, or thrown out. Either is fine by me. 

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I have had good luck with the Lucas Product, Ethanol Stabalizer in the 10% ethanol  gas we have here. Not firmiller with shell V power whats that non Ethanol gas? I too am about to run a 92 octane  non ethanol fuel in a Kolher 301as  12hp machine deadicated to snow removal. Let ya all know how I make out.

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