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persof

How would you fix this deck?

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How would you fix this deck?  A small sledge hammer is useless on this tough WH deck.  I am thinking about cutting three slits, then hammering back into shape and then re-welding the cuts.

 

Auto body men I need advice

 

topdeck.jpg

frontdeck.jpg

undersidedeck.jpg

 

Thanks

Francis

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Firs off what did you hit or the PO hit!! I think a hammer and some heat would work.

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I've had good luck with a big old pipe wrench. Other than that a hammer and some heat should work.

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Looks like the baffles will have to come out before you

can do much straightening. Second Ben and desko re hammer

and heat. Good you can weld.

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I agree with using a big pipe wrench. I've straightened lots of things with my 24 incher.

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Set up a hydraulic jack in some way to push it back correctly. Use a piece of flat plate on the jack head to not damage the deck as you push it out. Just go easy and you will get it out without stretching or damaging the metal any more. A pipe wrench or hammer will get it out but will also cause more damage that will need fixing as well. (And both will wear you out too)

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You could place the deck on edge and wedge it under something heavy, like a vehicle etc, then place the jack next to the deck (on the inside) and jack up against the bend, again go slow and easy!!!!

Looks like some baffle surgery needs to happen first though......

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Edited by Martin

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Flip it over and brace it against something very solid...like a railroad tie...that would touch at either side of the bend area. Anything solid that heavy banging won't destroy, or that you don't care about.  Hold a length of 2x4 (lay flat) at an angle so as to drive the end of it against the middle of the bend and seriously whack that 2x4 with a BFH...aka Post Maul aka sledge hammer of the 6lb sort.  Have a past friend or in-law hold the 2x4 for you.  You will also need to take the 'bow' out of the deck.  I can see that it is bowed just a little on the left side, but that will be exaggerated when cutting grass if not corrected.       

Edited by daveoman1966
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Well there you have it ...all of the above are acceptable ways to tackle this project  :handgestures-thumbupright:

But there remains 3  questions that need to be answered here ....

1 -- What did you hit ???   :eusa-think:

2 - How fast where you going ?? :scratchead:

3- How far did you fly off the tractor ??  :eusa-doh:

Good luck with your project ... keep us posted  :dance:

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Drill 3 holes in the damaged area.  Flip the deck on its back and bolt the deck down to a solid surface.  Use several of the holes already there to fix it solid.  Get a piece of 3x3 angle iron and drill three holes in it to match the three you drilled earlier into the deck.  Bolt the angle iron to the same solid work surface as the deck and line up the holes as good as possible.  Put 3/8 or 1/2 inch threaded rod thru the 3 deck holes and the angle iron, add nuts and maybe a backer place inside the deck and tighten the nuts.  Go slow alternating the nuts.  Think of this as the poor mans hydraulic jack.  With patience you should be able to get it pretty close to straight.

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The deck was like this when I bought it.  It is "very" noisy and I have replaced every bearing in the thing to no avail.  Hoping that some top side straightening will help.

 

2x4 boards split apart when I try to use one to hammer on.

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2x4 boards split apart when I try to use one to hammer on.

 

Look for hardwood boards old pallets and machinery shipping crates are good cheap sources.

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I have used a pipe wrench a few times. Plywood laying on a concrete slab will give good support to use a hammer.

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A lot of feasible ideas here and I'll add one more that has worked for me a few times. I would cut a 2x4 (yellow pine is tougher) to fit snug between the two roller brackets. Then use a couple of large C-clamps and start pulling it out, moving the clamps as needed. Basically the same idea as doc724 but without drilling holes. I think you'll be able to get the worst of it then just fine tune from there. Maybe when you get close space the 2x4 out with a couple small 1x2's at the ends so you can pull far it enough. It will probably want to spring back a fuzz.

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Drill 3 holes in the damaged area.  Flip the deck on its back and bolt the deck down to a solid surface.  Use several of the holes already there to fix it solid.  Get a piece of 3x3 angle iron and drill three holes in it to match the three you drilled earlier into the deck.  Bolt the angle iron to the same solid work surface as the deck and line up the holes as good as possible.  Put 3/8 or 1/2 inch threaded rod thru the 3 deck holes and the angle iron, add nuts and maybe a backer place inside the deck and tighten the nuts.  Go slow alternating the nuts.  Think of this as the poor mans hydraulic jack.  With patience you should be able to get it pretty close to straight.

Ditto on the 3X3 angle as a strongback to pull it back into shape.  Use  6-8  deep C clamps to pull it to the angle. Some of the bolt holes will move out of position as you get the deck edge pulled close to the angle .  Use blocks under the ends of the angle so you can over stress it to the correct shape as it will spring back.

Edited by ekennell
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Progress so far.  I have to figure out how to correct the LH side so that the roller will be straight.

post-2413-0-66346500-1403881411_thumb.jp

Edited by persof
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Once you get the deck straight you may not have a whole lot to do on that roller bracket. Take a couple of small pieces of wood and sandwich the arms with one of those big clamps. Then you will be able to ease it straight with it bending at the factory bend and not messing up the arms of the bracket. You're getting close :handgestures-thumbupright:

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Looks like you are going to force it to submit to your will,

but I can't imagine buying it in that condition in the first place.

What were you thinking?

Thanks for making me feel better about the state of my decks,

and good luck beating that beast back into shape!

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Lookin Good.    Can you lag bolt the roller bracket to the 4X4 as you have it positioned now.  Then take out the spacer block and pull that section in where the block is now ?

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Wow that turned out nice given its previous state. Great job!

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Virtually can't even tell...

very nicely done.   :handgestures-thumbsup:

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Impressive!

If you ever pass through the U.P., I have a couple of decks that I would like to show you....

Edited by cheesegrader

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