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Pullstart

Propagating plants, shrubs, trees…

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Pullstart

I’m on a mission to plant more trees on my property.  My mom has had an umbrella plant since my grandfather’s funeral in April of 2004 and she wanted to top it as it was nearing her ceiling.  I got a super cheap water cloning kit and some cups of potting mix, and some cloning gel to promote root growth.  Obviously, I can’t plant these umbrella plants outside if they take root because we are not in an adequate zone, but I hope to learn a thing or two about a thing or two.  If all goes well, I am even considering starting a small roadside nursery with some ornamental flowering trees, fruiting trees, etc.  

 

The drive for my trees is to build a stronger habitat for all wildlife, but especially deer.  Details of the entire transformation here…

 

 

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bc.gold
Posted (edited)

Small nursery is how Pat survived after her husband passed, another fellow told me the secret to clippings - use a vert\y sharp knife and cut on an angle.

 

Same fellow learned the trade in a concentration camp, happy ending his wife bought a small acreage in his absence so that he could carry on when he was finally released. If he saw someone trimming a cedar hedge he would offer to dispose of the clippings.

 

A buddy got my fathers grapevine clippings  fro these now has a two acre vineyard, had some help from a volunteer group. Young agricultural students during the summer wanting to put what they learned into practice - room and board.

 

When I was just a kid we had an apple tree with many different species of apples grafter onto it.

,

 

 

Edited by bc.gold
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8ntruck

We've got a rose bush that belonged to my great aunt.  We have had it since the mid 80's in Mi., and it was mature when we got it.  We moved it to Ky., then about 9 years later, we moved it to MO., where it has been for 20 years.

 

I would like to see if I can start a couple of plants from cuttings from this plant.  Looks likewhatever you used gave you a good start.  Think it will work on a rose bush?

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oliver2-44

I have about 6-8 Crape Myrtle Bushes which grow to a 20-30 ft bush in pots that I am growing from root sucker sprouts from my existing trees.  I dig in the ground, damage a root and a sprout will grow. 

 

Heres an old thread about using a potato to propagate roses.  The link doesn't work, but google it and lots or results.

 

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Pullstart

I’ve been watching this guy.  He sure makes it seem easy…


There are tons of more recent videos, but I like his style.

 

 

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953 nut

Air Layering is the best method of propagating woody plants because it depends on the host plant to provide moisture and nutrients during the propagation period. The process is quite easy and rather foolproof. Once the new plant is well rooted it can be transplanted directly into the yard or a large pot. The attached link is about as good as anything I found on the internet. Only things you need are rooting hormone, sphagnum moss and plastic bags. Do the air layer and come back in a few months to transplant, it is that simple.

 

https://www.bobvila.com/articles/air-layering/

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bc.gold
Posted (edited)

When I was growing garlic, the availability, price along with fear of introducing nematodes, this lead me to research propagating from plant cells.

 

DIY Tissue Culture - Why You Should Be Trying It

 

Now I have a use for the old cooler, thanks guys. This gives new meaning, visiting a commercial nursery, imagine what you could achieve with one small snippet.

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Pullstart

I was at Granda and Grandma’s house today helping with some trailer lights.  I took a couple branches each from the apple and pear trees.  I ended up with 18 apples and 40 pears in a sand filled wagon.  It has 5 drain holes and was a sandy medium from my deer water hole I dug last August.

 

It’ll stay outside for the winter and on the north side of the pool house.

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bc.gold
Posted (edited)

As a youth had an opportunity to work in a greenhouse everything we potted went into sterile soil which had been steamed on trays inside  a large chest made from wood.

 

IMO the algae nearby on the building and beam laying on the ground are a recipe for failure, my father used a copper sulphate solution on the mature fruit trees in our orchard which was shared with  our thanksgiving and Christmases dinners.

 

Great watch dogs to keep poachers out of the orchard.

 

When Should I Copper Sulfate My Fruit Trees?

 

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bc.gold

Silver compounds  are more effective at controlling mould and algae and have no adverse effects to animal and plant life.

 

The Antibacterial Effects of Silver and it’s compounds

 

Silver has germicidal effects and kills many lower organisms effectively without harm to higher animals.

 

Silver is capable of rendering stored drinking water potable for a long period of time (several months). Water tanks on ships and airplanes are often “silvered”.

 

Disposal of even small quantities of Silver Nitrate connected to a septic tank is guaranteed to destroy the septic bacteria and require pumping out, flushing and seeding with fresh bacteria.

 

Silver Nitrate has antiseptic properties. A very dilute solution is sometimes dropped into newborn babies’ eyes at birth to prevent contraction of gonorrhoea or chlamydia from the mother.

 

Fused Silver Nitrate, molded into sticks, was traditionally called lunar caustic. It is used as a cauterizing agent. Silver Nitrate is melted at 212°C ( 413°F ) and poured into a mold of the desired shape.

 

Silver Chloride is used as an Antibacterial agent for concrete ( 1 Lb Silver Chloride per cubic yard of Concrete (4,050 lbs) ).

 

Silver Chloride is used to help prevent bacteria from growing on Glass (when melted into the glass).

 

Silver Carbonate is used as an Antibacterial agent for concrete ( 1 Lb Silver Carbonate per cubic yard of Concrete (4,050 lbs) ).

 

Silver Carbonate is used as a biocide against bacteria, yeasts and molds in some Paints and Resins.

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bc.gold
On 1/4/2023 at 12:47 PM, Pullstart said:

I was at Granda and Grandma’s house today helping with some trailer lights.  I took a couple branches each from the apple and pear trees.  I ended up with 18 apples and 40 pears in a sand filled wagon.  It has 5 drain holes and was a sandy medium from my deer water hole I dug last August.

 

It’ll stay outside for the winter and on the north side of the pool house.

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This project is worthy of a live cam.

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Pullstart

I’ll be doing some cuttings indoors in the cool end of the basement near a daylight window too.  These are various cuttings from evergreens and hardwoods that grow nearby.  The medium will be sand and every species will have at least one clear cup for root form observations.

 

My selections for this part of my journey were chosen by scouting for deer activity.  Beds, browse, travel corridors, etc. As with the fruit tree cuttings, if just 5 or 10 of these actually take root, it’ll be worth it!

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Pullstart

As with any planting pots, the cups are all “ventilated” for drainage.

 

 

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Pullstart

I’ve read that some plants enjoy a “hair cut” when being cut to remind it to send energy to rooting, instead of growth.  Half of these pines were trimmed, the rest left shaggy.  I have no clue if anything will or will not work.  
 

 

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Pullstart

For my reference, the straighter cuttings on the left have been cut below a node, dipped in rooting gel, and stuck in the sand.  The branched out cup will get the lower 1/2” to 3/4” “wounded” before dipping in the gel.

 

 

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Pullstart

C’mon Mother Nature, it’s your turn for a while…


If we get any days in the next month or so where we’re in the 50’s, I might stick these outside where they can get the whole effect of nature.

 

 

 

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Pullstart

Update on the cuttings so far:  all the water bubble cuttings are getting mushy and stinky.  They’re getting dumped.  The dirt cuttings of the umbrella plants are doing fine.  All the basement cuttings were moved outside yesterday, because the weather was fairly mild.  I think the cold will keep them dormant, until the normal growing season… as intended.  The apple and pear cuttings are just there still.  At least a rabbit hasn’t taken them…

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Pullstart

Everything outside is still there… there are three umbrella plants and the little pine still indoors, all still alive looking.

 

 

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Pullstart

Today, I managed to get permission to snip some red osier dogwood, which is apparently an amazing deer browsing bush.  Once it’s in the area, birds appear to like it as well, because where ever they tend to perch, more grows.  I saw a video where a guy said it tasted kind of like a dry apple. Today, I’ll believe him!

 

The big pile on the left will be stuck in dirt, sand, water, maybe even direct to the ground outside, and some will be wounded 1 or 2 inches, some won’t.

 

The bits on the right are destined for the wood stove, for whatever reason… dead looking, too thick, too short, etc.

 

 

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Pullstart

120 cuttings! 

I separated them into 4 groups.  Half of each will be wounded and half will stay unharmed.  These tend to be easy propagating plants, so they will not receive any rooting hormones.

 

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Pullstart

The indoor/water cuttings are all trimmed to fit the bathroom window and it is a sunset exposure.  Yes, apparently my family thinks I stink and I got a few bars of soap for Christmas!

 

 

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Pullstart

The dirt cuttings are in.  Unharmed cuts in the small grey bowl and wounded cuts in the big dark one.  I’ll stick them on the deck and water them in for the winter.

 

 

 

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Pullstart

Similarly, the wounded cuts are in the dark bowl and unharmed in the light, for the sand.  Next up will be sticking some straight into the field, in groups of 5 or so, then caged to prevent deer getting them.

 

 

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