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11 hours ago, elcamino/wheelhorse said:

I need to visit you for a few weeks so you can teach me all your tricks on this build. Couple of problems , no passport and no money . Keep up the great work. 

Join the club Jim.  My passport has expired and the money doesn't hang around long enough to count it. :(

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The original sprocket and part of the tubular shaft, both too large in diameter, were cut from the clutch housing.  This was extended with a correct length and diameter replacement which was a VERY tight push in fit.  For push in I should say helped with a hammer. This was drilled for a roll pin as was the replacement sprocket.  Although the other end looked like it would never move this was also drilled and pinned while I was at it.

 

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The gearbox sprocket was not in line with it's big brother on the axle.  It needed to be moved inwards about 1/4".  A slice was carefully cut off with a thin cutting disc in my Dremel, held as steady as possible as these discs break almost by looking at them.  I got almost all the way through before the disc mounting shaft bottomed out.  The last bit was done from the opposite side.  No photo's of this operation but before and after shots with the sprocket back on the gearbox.  The section cut off, first photo, now moved to the outside. 

 

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A piece of plate was found for the engine mount, cut to size and drilled.  Two sets of holes, one to bolt the plate to the frame and the other set to mount the engine.  With the crankshaft in line with the gearbox shaft the right side engine bolt holes were well clear of the chassis.  The left side bolts were directly above the outer edge of the chassis.  A lot of head scratching later resulted in the top outer edge being drilled and filed out, just enough to allow the heads of 1/4" UNF bolts to sit in the notches and be held reasonably secure while tightening the nuts. These notches can be seen in the third photo which also shows the seat and fender mounting plate with a rough fender mock up.  More of these later.

 

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The rear plate mounting bolts passed right through the chassis.  Due to the lower face being filed out for extra axle swing the front bolts had to be inserted into the chassis, through the top face and engine plate.   A fiddly job but after assembling and taking apart a few times it got a lot easier.  There was just enough clearance in front of the axle to pass the bolt, stuck on the end of an extending magnet, up through the chassis and plate.  Not much clearance as said, which resulted in the magnet trying to get friendly with the surrounding metal.

 

As there was a lot of jumping around on various parts, due to getting stuck while looking for suitable materials or thinking how to do it, I have lost track of the exact build order but never mind.

 

The next few photo's are of the early steering mechanism, later scrapped for a simpler setup.  As seen, bits and pieces were bolted together until I had something which worked reasonably well and also had steering lock.  This can be seen in these top views.  The idea was to remake with fewer parts, but as said, a better arrangement was thought of.  The cranked plate, after lots of adjustments, touched both the chassis sides and spacer, stopping the wheels from turning too far.  It would have been better with the stops at the axle ends but couldn't see an easy way to do it.   No obvious problems occurred during the later test runs so maybe I could have left it as it was.

 

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A temporary tiller steering was fixed up for these test runs which worked well, sort of.  The handle end was close to the engine exhaust which resulted in an overheated hand.  This was cured by swinging the handle around 180 degrees.  These last photo's show the arrangement.  Blocks of wood clamped to the chassis with the tiller from a cut down mower gear lever.

 

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10 hours ago, elcamino/wheelhorse said:

Another lesson learn , don't throw away your bits and pieces , you may need them one day.

Been there, done that, still annoyed.  Keep lots of bits :)  or  :( no room to work.

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11 hours ago, elcamino/wheelhorse said:

Another lesson learn , don't throw away your bits and pieces , you may need them one day.

 

Now if only I could get my Hunny to understand there's actual LOGIC to a "pile of junk".....

 

OK not really... she's awesome....

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Still on the subject of the early steering, I adapted an old two speed hand drill to use as a steering box.  The idea was to have steering from the normal wheel and also from the rear while being towed on a trailer.  As the engine drive shaft was on the center line, the steering column was diverted around it via 1/4 drive universal joints and various extension bars.

 

The chuck ( removed ) end of the drill was extended with a welded in bar which just cleared the underside of the gearbox and protruded from the rear of the tractor. This would have been connected to a steering wheel on the trailer via another U/J and shaft.   The drill winding handle / lever was connected to the track rod assembly with a short rod and swivel joints.

 

This all worked OK but had excessive free play, mainly due to back lash between the drill gears. I eliminated some of this by drilling, tapping and inserting 4BA adjusting screws in the case which pushed the two bevel gears closer together but couldn't do anything with the helical and spur gearing.  After lots of work, trying to keep the U/J's and extensions at the minimum angle, allowing clearance, trying various setups etc and LOTS of head scratching, this arrangement was discarded.   As it appears that operation from a trailer is the way to go a much simpler mechanism is being worked on.  I have a new idea occupying the brain cell which MIGHT also enable steering from the correct position but would need a half size driver.  The following photo's show part of this early set up.

 

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As the chassis was getting close to needing a proving run before proceeding further, a seat of some sort was needed.  A sheet of 3/16" alloy was marked and cut using a length of channel as a guide for the saw.  Holes were drilled and a piece cut out to clear the gearbox.

 

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The test runs were made with bits of wood for footrests. Various positions were tried but it was difficult to sit in comfort.  Sitting as far back as possible, the best option, resulted in the front wheels lifting.  A roll of lead tied under the chassis cured this.  I also tried kneeling on the platform, one hand on the engine to steady myself, and the other operating the steering tiller and throttle. All very awkward especially while bouncing over the rough ground.  

 

The runs were successful with just enough engine speed for the centrifugal clutch to engage and in first and then second gear.  As camera man Mr Sutton wasn't available at the time, no video made.  This was rectified on later test runs.  I then set the steering and throttle and watched it run around in circles.  Easier than trying to stop myself being thrown off.

 

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Alan , my guess is the two speed hand drill was destroyed in your quest. That is a shame as that is the only time I have seen a drill of that nature. Where or where is the video ? I must have missed the lesson on how you connect the engine to the rear. I see a drive shaft but I want to learn more.

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Hi Jim.
Yes, the 2 speed drill was unusable for drilling afterwards.  There are still a lot of various second hand ones on eBay so not very rare. 
 
The drive from engine to gearbox, previously described, can be clearly seen on the photo above.   Engine shaft with small sprocket - chain down to larger sprocket which is attached to gearbox input shaft.
 
Video's will be posted soon.
 
 

 


 

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The two speed hand drills may be available  on your side of the pond, but that is the first time I had ever seen one. You know how we colonists are , it becomes out date throw it in the dust bin. HA HA , Will be glad when the video appears . This is a very interesting project.

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That's a neat usage of the drill. I have a couple in the garage that my grandfather had in his shop.

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Posted (edited)

The driverless test run.  MVI_5672.MOV    

Might take a while to load.   This will be followed soon by others with Chris Sutton and I trying the chassis for size. :rolleyes:

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

Edited by Alan R.

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On 8/8/2017 at 7:55 PM, elcamino/wheelhorse said:

The two speed hand drills may be available  on your side of the pond, but that is the first time I had ever seen one. You know how we colonists are , it becomes out date throw it in the dust bin. HA HA , Will be glad when the video appears . This is a very interesting project.

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Miller Falls made a two speed hand drill. I have my father's, the lower rose wood handle got busted off some time. I still used it for small holes when I don't need many.

SAM_0725.jpg

 

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As Mr Sutton has not yet put the other video's on utube, :poke:( he must be extra busy hiding his latest haul of firewood ) the next stage was to make up the side panels.  First were the chassis extensions.  These were made 5/8" deeper than the chassis box section, to give scale depth, with an extra 1/2" added top and bottom for folding over. 

 

The bottom fold was to give extra strength and also to help stop the skin of my hands from being attacked by what would have been a sharp edge while constantly reaching under during the build.

 

This can be seen on the photo's.  A right angle bend followed by tapping over then finished by flattening in the brake press.

 

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This brake press, with a capacity of about 24" was found by Chris during the clear out at friend John's place.  He also finds things which are not RED. :) Old but effective especially with the 1mm approx alloy sheet used for the panels.  These panels were, we think, either from old buses or maintenance vehicles. John had a friend who worked for a local bus company.  These were large panels with the remains of paint and lettering, some with cut outs which could have been vents.  Whatever they were they were recycled and put to good use.

 

The chassis side extensions were followed by the wider upper panels, two long next with the shorter top two having a slightly angled rear edge.  These top two, marked out and bent up as a pair, overlap the lower ones like the full size and are folded over at the rear.  All shown just loosely fitted along with the upper rear panel.

 

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I like the bending break , nothing like a clear out for treasures to appear. One man's trash is another man's treasure.

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On 7/22/2017 at 7:00 PM, elcamino/wheelhorse said:

I need to visit you for a few weeks so you can teach me all your tricks on this build. Couple of problems , no passport and no money . Keep up the great work. 

Jim I wouldn't waste the money. If you got over there, no one would be able to find you and your suspenders would clash with Alan's. :lol:

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Posted (edited)

I would only wear braces , no belt. Belts restrict gas movement.

Edited by elcamino/wheelhorse
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One of the few pieces of metal which was not found as scrap was the grill and headlamp surround.  Nothing of suitable thickness to hand but the Showman came to the rescue and obtained some cut to width alloy from a contact of his.  Thanks Chris. :thumbs:  A jig was made up from a thick sheet of board and coach bolts.  Allowance was made when fitting these bolts for the thickness of the metal, either side and top and bottom, so that the correct outside width and height was obtained.  The alloy strip was clamped to the bolts and bent around in stages.  Two of the lower bolts not yet fitted in the photo's.

 

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The front chassis cross member was made up from various metal and alloy pieces all bolted together and in turn to the chassis.  As the front mounting bolts of the grill passed into a box section with no way of fitting nuts, a length of 1/4" stud was used instead which passed through the total width of the chassis leaving enough either side for nuts and washers.  Cannot find photo's of this assembly at this stage. :(

 

 

 
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Great idea, Alan. Noted and logged. :handgestures-thumbupright:

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Just found the photo's that I couldn't find. :)  This shows the cross member assembly trial fitted at the front of the chassis.  Thought I also had one showing it before fitting but no sign of it.

 

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Should have mentioned earlier that I had a LOT of help from Iain ( slf-uk ) with photo's and measurements.  On one of his numerous visits to John's he mentioned that he had a D-160 and 200 and offered to obtain any details I required.  This offer was taken up countless times with Iain dropping everything, day and night, and rushing into his workshop with camera, tape, and notebook.  Well, not quite rushing but a speedy response. A lot of the photo's found on the internet didn't show details from the correct angle but a request to Iain explaining what I wanted produced the required result.  A BIG THANKS Iain. :thumbs:

 

Now that the grill surround was made it needed something to fill the hole.  The grill was made from 3/4 x 1/2" alloy angle with 3/16" silver steel uprights, threaded 2BA at the top and drilled 1/16" at the bottom for a wire pin.  The spacers were from alloy tube.  Using the 1/2" width of the angle as the front face with a 1/2" gap between each plus the same top and bottom looked about right.  A lot of careful measuring, cutting and drilling gave a good copy of the original.  The anti rattle leaf spring at the top was from steel shim with threaded tubes over the tops of the uprights where they protruded through the grill surround. This alloy angle was from a green house which John and I dismantled years ago for a friend of his, transported back to his land, stored behind his shed and has never moved until recently.  I saved a good selection of various sizes.

 

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Finally, I just had to give the grill a coat or two of paint, the first item painted, to see what it looked like. :)

 

 

 

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After the grill and surround was mounted it was thought that additional support would be a good idea.  Various ways were thought up and discarded.  Some being too unsightly, others not rigid enough.  The method finally settled on was simple and strong.  Two brackets were bent up which were bolted to the front face of the engine cover and to the underside of the grill surround. 4BA nuts and bolts were used making sure that the holes drilled in the cover were clear of the fuel tank underside and internal deflectors.  These photo's are out of focus but show the set up.

 

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The headlamp surround was bent up around a shaped wood former. I don't appear to have photo's of this. The full size was welded to the grill surround but bolted on the model, again using 4BA nuts and bolts.  These can just be seen on the grill photo above. 

 

 

 

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I think the next part I attempted was the dash assembly.  Two 3/16" thick alloy panels were cut for the front and rear with a bent up alloy spacer pop riveted on.  When first looking at photo's I had thought that both front and rear had an apex on the top surface.  It was only after I had build number one well on the way that my man with the camera, tape and notebook, Iain, pointed out my mistake.  I made three or four alterations, gradually reducing the front apex and leveling off the rear before it looked about right.  These photo's are before any alterations.

 

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The outer shell was originally bent so that it finished on the underside and left oversize back and front for trimming later.  The first attempt also looked too long when viewed from the side.

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This photo shows the top rear looking more like it should be. 

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There were a lot of alterations and head scratching before the final result which included brackets bent up to hold front, rear and outer shell together.  Also a strong mount for the steering column bush and cross beams for mounting to the upper side panels.   Lots of assorted BA nuts and bolts were used which resulted in a very strong assembly.

 

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The brackets set at an angle on the front face are for the spring loaded hood locking catches, more of these later.  The Steering column bush is a 1/2" socket cap screw drilled 5/16".  I drilled two of these, the second for the steering wheel.  This will also be described later.

.

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The footrests were another item I had a few attempts at before finishing up with something that looked right in comparison with the rest of the build.  One pair looked too long and narrow, another try ended up with the fold overs not being deep enough.  Fairly quick to mark out and make so not too much hair pulled out.  Again, made from the scrap 1mm alloy panels. The first attempts found a use elsewhere after being cut up.

 

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How to make the fenders. ?  Simply bending up on the brake press wasn't thought viable due to the curves at each end, although I now think it could have been done with a bit of NON press work included.    Also the corners would need alloy welding etc.  Another possibility was making a plug and molding in fiber glass.   I decided to make these using built up layers of plasticard sheet reinforced with alloy.  I already had a good stock of this plasticard.   This resulted in very strong fenders.  The plastic, welded together with liquid polystyrene cement, was thick enough to sand the curves on ends and sides.  The alloy inserts were a very tight fit after making a few short trial sections to get the bends in the correct place.   Also bolted at the corners although they wouldn't come out easily.  The top of each footrest slides into the slot at the front of the fenders and will be bolted in place when finished.

 

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