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So what do you guys prefer to use for precision measuring of engine specifications, bores, cranks, piston diameters, etc? Right now all I have is a cheaper (hobbyist) set of 6" digital calipers commonly found on the popular auction sites. Works good for general shop use but in my K241 work I came to find out quickly this is not adequate. I did recently order a set of the telescoping bore gauges. They were only 15 bucks so what the heck. Any & all opinions & ideas welcome.

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A set of bore gauges & some micrometers should be what you need. 

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Starret mics can be picked up at auctions frequently for less than $10.00 . 

 I still have a 2-3"  like new Starret I bought for $1.00.    The rookie auctioneer  sold it as a C clamp.  

Telescoping (bore) gages and outside mics in the 0-5" range.

I have inside mics also, but I feel I am more accurate using the  telescope gages and outside mics.

Edited by Ed Kennell
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2 hours ago, Ed Kennell said:

inside mics also, but I feel I am more accurate using the  telescope gages

Takes a fair amount of practice to be accurate with any precision measuring device. I can get a general idea of the condition of a cylinder by using an old piston ring and checking the end gap and looking for light getting by the side of the ring at various points down thy cylinder. Push it down an inch at a time using the old piston so you know it is square to the cylinder. If the bore seems to be needing attention then the machine shop will have to measure it anyway. The caliper will give you a good indication for cranks, but if you use a bit of plastigage that will tell you how well the rod is fitting. 

 

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Ditto all of the above posts of the Guy's principles and methods. I also tend to be meticulous with checking fit/wear or Go/No go on any engine etc.

I also set myself challenges and measure by 'Feel'  with inside/outside calipers, then take measurements from those.

I then compare with Hole Gauges and Mic's  etc to see how close I can discern accuracy by feel.

I have a number of items I use regularly for many jobs (Hobby), some of which are shown below. 

The Lever type Dial Indicator is 69 years old and still good for 5/10,000ths of an inch, or better. I also use it for setting Techy Timing BTDC of the Piston.

The Engineer's Blue (paste) assists with highlighting High spots or wear points on Bearing/Crank Journals etc. Nothing in this pic is less than 30 years old-

 DSC01654.thumb.JPG.69f2ac4b237926868e91d71b872e2612.JPG

 

Like most Tools, you get what you pay for and it depends how often you will have a use for them that will dictate what you pay. If you know the source, you could also buy secondhand and obtain high quality measurement tooling for less money. Whatever you get, enjoy using them and get those engines running smooth and sweet. 

    

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Absolutely awesome Anglo... just learned my weight in gold & points taken!:handgestures-thumbupright:

Edited by WHX9
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Like Anglo,  I have a passion for the older basic hand tools. 

  It is clear,  the accuracy of  measuring tools can vary greatly with the skill of the user.

The exception would be a robot operated co-ordinate measuring machine with non contact laser probes.  Most of us no longer have access to one of these.

Here is a picture of the tool case and some of the  tools I used for inspection hydro turbines. 

Probably would have a problem carrying this on a plane as I did for 40 years.

IMG_7224.thumb.JPG.917fbcaad03ee8e0f61b3fab2650a505.JPG

 

   And this is probably my most prized possession...  A carpenters tool chest hand made by my Wife's Grandfather about 100 years ago.

 

Note the custom cam locks to position and hold every saw in place during transportation to his next job site.

 

IMG_7226.thumb.JPG.dfcb3a444d3fa0e3d2768468336c3a48.JPGIMG_7222.thumb.JPG.ceb42f6268a6d978627c46a9cf6cc50c.JPGIMG_7223.thumb.JPG.9ea414b2974d3f14ae7c0d9936d77b68.JPG

 

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1 hour ago, Ed Kennell said:

Like Anglo,  I have a passion for the older basic hand tools. 

  It is clear,  the accuracy of  measuring tools can vary greatly with the skill of the user.

The exception would be a robot operated co-ordinate measuring machine with non contact laser probes.  Most of us no longer have access to one of these.

Here is a picture of the tool case and some of the  tools I used for inspection hydro turbines. 

Probably would have a problem carrying this on a plane as I did for 40 years.

 And this is probably my most prized possession...  A carpenters tool chest hand made by my Wife's Grandfather about 100 years ago>.

 

Call me weird, but I have a hankering for quality tools, the older the better. You have a great collection there Ed:bow-blue:.

 

Most of my tooling is inherited from my Father who worked on Aircraft from Apr 1939 - 85, so I have great affinity with the tools and I take great care of them.

I also have many woodworking tools of his and are all kept as sharp as new. I'm making Chests for them at the moment.

I hope my Son will take them on after me.

Regards, Richard.    

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Very nice Ed, got one of these in there? Guys were giving me grief cause I ws using it to square up my front end!:lol: BTW the horse shoe should be pointed up tho so the luck don't run out!

58c4690e80ed9_11.thumb.jpg.1455aa7b85100d8fa4cb2f0b2ed595fc.jpg

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Horseshoes-200x300.jpg   Some parts of the world believe the upper one keeps and preserves good luck forever. 

                                        Some, like me wife's Grandad,  believe the bottom one continually spills out good luck for you.

 

                                                                Be safe, display both.

                                  And, no, no Tee square alignment tools on my box.      :rolleyes:

 

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Two different ways of lookin at the same pony I guess! :handgestures-thumbupright:

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I found an old horseshoe in my woods and nailed it over the door in my barn.  The open side is pointed up so my luck doesn't run out, but I think it has a malfunction.

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Truth be told Lynn maybe a guy should do one of both!:)

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I'd be all over this one -

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mitutoyo-Bore-Gauge-No-2923F-10-Kit-02-2-4/371893538311?_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982&_trkparms=aid%3D888007%26algo%3DDISC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D40130%26meid%3Db2efa2a0858b41cd9c43beca2634c0f0%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26sd%3D141472741994

 

Dial type bore gauges are about the most accurate for less than educated users - the rocker type dial gauge somewhat takes out the user error of using T-type bore gauges which have a certain learning curve as to the "feel" when they are set just right in the bore . Using either type also requires a good quality outside micrometer that covers the range needed for the measurement - you can easily find top name micrometers cheap on Ebay - just watch out for any signs of them being dropped or chipped . Digital is the easiest to understand/read but a few simple videos from YouTube will teach anyone to read a graduated increment micrometer . I clamp my micrometers in the vise with soft rubber/urethane pads , get out the T-gauges and go to town for measuring hole diameters . It just takes practice and if you do buy a micrometer it's nice to get a full 0"-4"/6" set with standards - those standards are important to check the mic's accuracy and make sure it's not out of whack . The standards are even more important when buying used - so learn a bit before any bidding and be wary of far too cheap tools , especially knock-off imported stuff . If the price seems to good to be true - it usually is .

 

That said - I've had some seriously good accuracy from i-Gaging lately and have bought several of their measuring tools . Checking them against my machinist buddy's top line equipment - all have checked out less than 1% of tolerance , so I'm pretty happy . Wouldn't hesitate for a second for this setup for a decent dial bore gauge , although i doubt I'd trust it for any race or high performance engine -

http://www.ebay.com/itm/iGaging-Dial-Bore-Gauge-0-7-6-0-0005-Deep-Engine-Hole-Cylinder-Measurement/322449956152?_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982&_trkparms=aid%3D888007%26algo%3DDISC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D40130%26meid%3Db2efa2a0858b41cd9c43beca2634c0f0%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26sd%3D141472741994

 

In fact , think I might order one since a friend borrowed my Mitutoyo and dropped it - so he's paying for it anyway ....

 

Sarge

 

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