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formariz

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DennisThornton

Nothing like BRASS, you meant.  

Yeah, I love brass, too!   Been saving scraps with the notion that I'd cast someday.  Love the old brass wood inlaid planes!  Well, love most wood planes...

 

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formariz
2 hours ago, DennisThornton said:

Nothing like BRASS, you meant.  

Yeah, I love brass, too!   Been saving scraps with the notion that I'd cast someday.  Love the old brass wood inlaid planes!  Well, love most wood planes...

 

Like this one?D436BF2B-B45F-4B6F-A1CE-A101E469CC46.jpeg.058f92b49ed6bf3232d9011a50a4e0c3.jpeg

 

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DennisThornton
1 minute ago, formariz said:

Like this one?D436BF2B-B45F-4B6F-A1CE-A101E469CC46.jpeg.058f92b49ed6bf3232d9011a50a4e0c3.jpeg

 

Beautiful!  I have several planes, mostly Stanleys, the common and some not so.  Have a few wooden planes too.  Dovetailed steel bottom I see.  Yep!  Very nice indeed!  I have no inlaids and I never see any to buy. 

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formariz

Brass pieces are now completed . Next step will be in laying them into ends.

21E6040E-1641-4361-A4DC-505D2EC200E3.jpeg.c314d6941300f15eb6fe7513f9cbde95.jpeg

 

10E1D9D5-5F14-45D7-8C97-5DEFB9B7B409.jpeg.191e6edcdf43ddc610e38f361895a8dc.jpeg

 

02684AFD-C16D-4F24-B1B3-8E0B96582833.jpeg.e81e11e61ca2b6bcb0e483572e576c8b.jpeg

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formariz

Brass piece now inlaid into end. This is a rather difficult job due to the end grain and the different angles on it also. I use a combination of tools I made. Starting with a type of a croze and then with a special float for the bulk of work. Float cuts end grain fairly easily much like a low angle plane.5691B7D1-E7CC-449F-B604-132BF62FE61D.jpeg.d0254250023472b27712bb917c3862de.jpeg

 

E6970593-1733-4A50-A81F-A0E51DE2521A.jpeg.70ce7d1b011cc3c8417e5d210e476617.jpeg

 

3BFC316B-328B-4D0F-BD4A-9DA9D8EF6388.jpeg.077ac99b0cca62bb039d60ae09eeb414.jpeg

 

A1AF9D36-EDF8-4629-A3E9-F5B7243EBCF0.jpeg.e747fa901755e41f60d1ac01aa7caa71.jpeg

 

2E381164-91D3-4FCB-933C-5ED7CF97FE89.jpeg.8ca507cd54b3b126af0d74864fc860a4.jpeg

 

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5E2AE505-15A5-4746-886D-2FCEF6B35D5E.jpeg.ec1a037c51009671ec8312d9714588a9.jpeg

69879531-0F8D-4763-A236-E8722C265C19.jpeg.2afedb03b540ad44f3b3fe92cf5252b9.jpeg

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DennisThornton
11 minutes ago, formariz said:

Brass piece now inlaid into end. This is a rather difficult job due to the end grain and the different angles on it also. I use a combination of tools I made. Starting with a type of a croze and then with a special float for the bulk of work. Float cuts end grain fairly easily much like a low angle plane.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2E381164-91D3-4FCB-933C-5ED7CF97FE89.jpeg.8ca507cd54b3b126af0d74864fc860a4.jpeg

 

81A16D7B-D0D4-4F17-B590-A76224C52266.jpeg.bcf2aad9adbe9002c78431f3158588ab.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

087D5BA7-B925-42BB-8192-05008D4B8141.jpeg.cca78ba82f7aa6943379bd6ada9670d5.jpeg

 

 

69879531-0F8D-4763-A236-E8722C265C19.jpeg.2afedb03b540ad44f3b3fe92cf5252b9.jpeg

I pictured all that with chisel and mallet but I guess I can't say you cheated, just used two mortising tools I've never seen quite like that!  Never seen on mounted and I'm not sure I've seen them curved.

One of those slotted screws is a couple degrees off...

 

As usual, awesome!  Tools and talent!

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formariz
20 minutes ago, DennisThornton said:

One of those slotted screws is a couple degrees off...

LOL. I had seen that and it was immediately corrected.

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DennisThornton
5 minutes ago, formariz said:

LOL. I had seen that and it was immediately corrected.

Well I certainly hope so!  :ROTF:

 

I'm groping for the correct word for your mortising tools.

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DennisThornton

Broaches?

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formariz
9 minutes ago, DennisThornton said:

Broaches?

There really is no specific name for them since they are really unique and you will not find another two like them.

This one is really my version of a Cooper's Croze. It just happens to be appropriate for the starting cuts in this case since it really is made for a curved surface anyway.

 

2E381164-91D3-4FCB-933C-5ED7CF97FE89.jpeg.8ca507cd54b3b126af0d74864fc860a4.jpeg

 

This one I made for mortising narrow concave mortises pretty much like on this situation. It works just like a plane makers float which essentially is a file but due to the nature of having wide teeth it cuts like a plane. Its used by pulling it over material and it makes a very controlled smooth cut. If one rocks it along its curve, it will cut like a ripsaw. It is great on end grain providing a smooth fast cut.

010F1032-A265-4DD5-8194-1B590BD2411F.jpeg.ac8d0fc84cf83fdfa2e7ca8c8bb8ab87.jpeg

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DennisThornton

I should have picked up on the croze.  Forgot the name but know what it does.

Knife makers use and call this a broach.  I guess most are handmade

image.png.5e59ddd2168339a8eec0dbf56356fcd7.png

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formariz
2 hours ago, DennisThornton said:

Knife makers use and call this a broach.  I guess most are handmade

Also a tool devised to deal with a particular situation. Essentially a combination mortise chisel/rip saw.

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DennisThornton
1 minute ago, formariz said:

Also a tool devised to deal with a particular situation. Essentially a combination mortise chisel/rip saw.

Yep!  But probably not called a combination mortise chisel/rip saw. :ROTF:

 

You really got me with that end grain.  I was all ready for a real struggle.

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formariz
32 minutes ago, DennisThornton said:

You really got me with that end grain.  I was all ready for a real struggle.

Difficult but there are many different ways of dealing with it.  For this particular case that is the most efficient way of dealing with it. If it was an area to be carved that needed a glass smooth finish from the gouge or chisel I then would soften it with alcohol first and then carve it. The alcohol will soften it substantially but it will not cause it to swell like water will and it will evaporate quickly. As a young man I was taught to when planing  the end grain of door casings while fitting miters to lick it prior to planing it. Sounds crazy but it works. Just one of thousands of little known tricks lost to most today.

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DennisThornton
11 hours ago, formariz said:

Difficult but there are many different ways of dealing with it.  For this particular case that is the most efficient way of dealing with it. If it was an area to be carved that needed a glass smooth finish from the gouge or chisel I then would soften it with alcohol first and then carve it. The alcohol will soften it substantially but it will not cause it to swell like water will and it will evaporate quickly. As a young man I was taught to when planing  the end grain of door casings while fitting miters to lick it prior to planing it. Sounds crazy but it works. Just one of thousands of little known tricks lost to most today.

I've read about using alcohol but never tried it.  I wonder if it is still the water in a 70%/30% that is doing the work?

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formariz
4 hours ago, DennisThornton said:

I've read about using alcohol but never tried it.  I wonder if it is still the water in a 70%/30% that is doing the work?

For sure the water is doing the most work in that solution. The alcohol's main function there is to "wick" out the water faster. I am not fond of using water unless it is something very small. Water and dried wood are not good companions. Whatever liquid is used ( I also use mineral spirits) one should not really soak material entirely with it since there are adverse consequences of that. I merely keep a small rag soaked with it and just dab it on locally  as I need it. After all you just want to soften what the gouge is going to cut right away which is not much.

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formariz

Been away from it for a couple of days but it has never been away from me. Time to inlay the brass on the other side.

75108CA2-FEDF-4986-8421-E5B30D53BECE.jpeg.034c3704d6cee3fc0058c1a960ff951f.jpeg

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