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bcgold

Wheel Dowels

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Posted (edited)

The loaded tires on my " Other " the 9020 are awkward to manhandle back onto the tractor, so I made a pair of dowels that I screw in at the 9 and 3 o'clock positions to align the stud holes in the rim.

 

Apparently I've exceeded the file space allotted me, rather than delete previously posted images I've gone off site with postimage.

 

studs.png

Edited by bcgold
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Use 7/16" fine bolts and 60's Chevy lug nuts. Easy on and off. 

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Posted (edited)

Amen.Best mod you can do.Easy and inexpensive. I install them with Loctite and torque them to 45 ft lbs.

Edited by JAinVA
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58 minutes ago, JAinVA said:

Amen.Best mod you can do.Easy and inexpensive. I install them with Loctite and torque them to 45 ft lbs.

 

Why not drill out the threaded hole to accept pressed in wheel studs, with a spacer these can also be pulled securely into place.

 

The old Fords and Dodges used a single dowel, replacing a rim and tire the dowel was set at 12 o'clock gravity did the rest.

stud.png

 

studd.png

 

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Posted (edited)

I'm not sure there would be enough metal left in the rim of the hub if drilled out.Since I have that doubt I use bolts.It has the added benefit of not having to remove 

the hub for drilling or trying to hand drill it while mounted on the tractor.

Edited by JAinVA
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10 minutes ago, JAinVA said:

I'm not sure there would be enough metal left in the rim of the hub if drilled out.Since I have that doubt I use bolts.It has the added benefit of not having to remove 

the hub for drilling or trying to hand drill it while mounted on the tractor

Agreed.

Flanges aren't large enough in diameter to ensure durability near outside edge.

 

And super easy to put the bolts in.

 

All Tractors we have here have them and likely every tractor I ever build will get them.

 

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Posted (edited)

One of the things I harp on is why WH did certain things.Tapered bolts were a cost decision.Hub and 5 bolts done. Larger hub,5 studs and 5 lug nuts.Five more parts to order,inventory and install.If you are selling for a profit the tapered bolts were a no brainer.

Edited by JAinVA

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You can purchase the right tool for every job requirement, pilot drills would assure straight holes using a hand drill.

 

From the American Machinists Page, I came across this interesting tidbit.

https://www.americanmachinist.com/cutting-tools/solid-carbide-chamfering-tools-multi-material-drilling

 

While the July report represents the second consecutive decline in cutting tool consumption, the new results bring the total for 2018 cutting-tool consumption to $1.413 billion, an 11.7% rise over the comparable, seven-month total for cutting-tool consumption in 2017.

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, ebinmaine said:

Agreed.

Flanges aren't large enough in diameter to ensure durability near outside edge.

 

And super easy to put the bolts in.

 

All Tractors we have here have them and likely every tractor I ever build will get them.

 

 

A bit of research tells me that the splined pressed in studs are engineered that way to allow proper stretch of the complete length of the stud when torquing the wheel nut into place. The splined section is free to move longitudinally in the hole, using a standard bolt with a thread locker will give an improper torque.

 

Your torque wrench may indicate proper torque has been reach but the full length of the bolt has not, thread locker would have prevented a full stretch.

 

Then there's the argument that your thread locker will eventually fatigue from the longitude torque.

 

stud.png

Edited by bcgold

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6 minutes ago, bcgold said:

 

A bit of research tells me that the splined pressed in studs are engineered that way to allow proper stretch of the complete length of the stud when torquing the wheel nut into place. The splined section is free to move longitudinally in the hole, using a standard bolt with a thread locker will give an improper torque.

 

Your torque wrench may indicate proper torque has been reach but the full length of the bolt has not, thread locker would have prevented a full stretch.

 

Then there's the argument that your thread locker will eventually fatigue from the longitude torque.

 

stud.png

What you're saying definitely makes sense but I wouldn't comment on it one way or the other without having doing the research on it myself, first.

Very interesting though.

I personally don't use any thread lock around the wheel studs.

I'm not sure if I have a good reason for that other than the fact that I'm quite frugal.

Having seen multiple chipped and cracked cast Wheelhorse hubs and having broken one myself on purpose for experimentation reasons, I can assure you they are quite brittle.

When I fasten a wheel I put a 1 and 1/2 inch bolt into the back of the Hub and tighten it with a regular combination wrench. Not a torque wrench.

Then I install the wheel and the lug nuts and tighten them to whatever the specified torque table is.

Being in the trucking industry, whenever we change a tire we have to go back and retorque it after about a hundred miles or so. I often do that with the tractor wheels as well. I have actually found a couple that moved just a bit after an hour or two of usage.

 

 

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We do have to remember we’re talking garden tractors here with a max speed about a good jog for a middle aged man, I’d say.  The hubs have a flat back side that allow use of a grade 8 (my preference) fine thread bolt just dandy.  No machine work, drilling or pressing of studs.  If there is safety concerned of loosing a tire at 3 mph, I have a feeling some other concern in that instance would be the safety threat...  like someone witnessing it :D  I Pullstart on the other hand, was witnessed at the big show breaking my pull start recoil, running out of gas and numerous other ignoramous happenings.  But as in loosing a wheel at 3 mph, no harm no foul.  :handgestures-thumbupright:

 

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49 minutes ago, pullstart said:

We do have to remember we’re talking garden tractors here with a max speed about a good jog for a middle aged man, I’d say.  The hubs have a flat back side that allow use of a grade 8 (my preference) fine thread bolt just dandy.  No machine work, drilling or pressing of studs.  If there is safety concerned of loosing a tire at 3 mph, I have a feeling some other concern in that instance would be the safety threat...  like someone witnessing it :D  I Pullstart on the other hand, was witnessed at the big show breaking my pull start recoil, running out of gas and numerous other ignoramous happenings.  But as in loosing a wheel at 3 mph, no harm no foul.  :handgestures-thumbupright:

 

 

That front end loader that some of us have can bring you a world of grief, last year I met a fellow who had licked up a large round bale then when he lifted it to high the bale rolled down the loader arms taking him off the seat breaking both hips.

 

One year I was clearing show from city sidewalks with my Thomas skid steer when I hit the lip of a manhole cover hidden under the snow, I was almost ejected from the machine. No seat belt.

 

If you adhere to safe practices it carries over.

 

14,000,000 lawnmower related incidents. https://www.google.com/search?biw=1051&bih=462&ei=lSi-W6rgIOmH_Qaq_6uACg&q=man+dies+lawn+mower&oq=man+dies+lawn+mower&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0j0i8i30k1l2.100782.101489.0.103072.9.4.0.0.0.0.185.347.0j2.2.0....0...1.1.64.psy-ab..7.1.161....0.NSxxfTqyl4I

 

Edited by bcgold

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