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Oldman

1973 18 Auto Voltmeter Mod

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Hello,

    I tried to rework the Ammeter Circuit and decided it a simpler task to replace it with a nice Illuminated Volt-Meter.

1973 18 Auto -mod.JPG

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Yep, I'm slowly changing my ammeters over to volt meters....

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I need to do mine yet - the original ammeter is holding quite a lot of water droplets in it nicely but for whatever reason still wants to work . Been keeping an eye out for some old stock vintage look Stewart Warner gauges for it - need all 3 and that specific series doesn't come cheap - especially the electric types of oil gauges and their sending units .

 

Sarge

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Yes, I know, it's the Wing Series. I have one sitting in the box for when this one craps out on  me! I have an ammeter in one of my other tractors than gets droplets in it and it still keeps on working, been meaning to change it.

 

Oldman

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I somewhat prefer the tombstone style - not to mention they are about half the cost depending upon which one you need . The wings style is cool , but to me they belong in aircraft and a D is about as opposite that as it can get - more like an ugly flying brick....lol . For the oil pressure side , not sure if I want to trust an electric versus having to use a braided stainless line on a mechanical one - price is close in the two at that point but the mechanical is generally more accurate and reliable . I would like to upgrade this engine to a filter head and also fit a temperature probe to watch the engine oil temps .

 

Sarge

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22 hours ago, pacer said:

Yep, I'm slowly changing my ammeters over to volt meters....

A wise choice I believe.:handgestures-thumbupright:

I've never been a fan of ammeters.:no:  :snooty:   :angry-nono:   :bitch:

I like being able to read voltage before, during, and after start so I wired it to give a reading from "key-on/run" and "start".

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A voltmeter that dies is an irritation...when an Amp meter dies many times so does the tractor.

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28 minutes ago, pfrederi said:

A voltmeter that dies is an irritation...when an Amp meter dies many times so does the tractor.

Sort of like this.......

 

 

Oldman

melt down.JPG

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Yep - most times like that unless you get really lucky - sometimes they just burn out or lose the link across the contacts . Other times , they can burn down a piece of equipment , vehicle , ect...

 

Sarge

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So...ok.... I never understood ammeters.  :wacko:  What are they measuring and what should be the ideal number? 

 

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It should show charge maybe 10 amps or so right after startup, but should quickly drop back o 0 assuming the battery is in good shape.  If you just turn the switch on and your points happen to be closed you should see a discharge or 3-4 amps.  if you turn the lights on with engine not running will show 10-15 amp discharge.

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So I usually see that it is mainly on the + side. Higher reading upon initial start up. I have never seen it go to zero; always an amp or two to the plus side. New battery. Is that normal?

 

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Should go to zero...but the amp meter may be inaccurate, the voltage regulators are not precision devices. Wiring issues are possible as is a bad ground for eh regulator  i wouldn't worry too much about it.  After all the unregulated systems charge 3 amps all the time needed or not.

Edited by pfrederi
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If anything is suspect or you don't trust the ammeter - check it with a volt meter at the battery . Normal readings are from 13.8-14.6 volts dc , above or below that range and you have a problem . The biggest issue with ammeters is all the charging current passes through them before the battery - they can be dangerous if they short out or fail and can burn a vehicle to the ground . Some systems used a shunt setup to lessen the amperage at the gauge but they are still pretty inaccurate . All they really do is measure the current passing through them and give you no idea of the system voltage - which is really the most important part .

 


Sarge

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So the long and short of it is... Check voltage @  the battery.!!! :greetings-clappingyellow:    Would it be wiser to leave ammeter gauge alone @ this point in my "Princess" 1974 B-80? ....or disconnect the ammeter gauge in the event that some day I will regret doing that???

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11 minutes ago, JimmyJam said:

disconnect the ammeter gauge

:text-yeahthat:

 

Jim, I'm not a fan of ammeters and never have been due to the rare but dangerous and often disastrous shorts.

I've replaced mine with a voltmeter and will on the "new" ride as well.

 

If you want to just take it out of the circuit and most danger, connect one terminal to the other. Doesn't matter which one you move.

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1 minute ago, ebinmaine said:

:text-yeahthat:

 

Jim, I'm not a fan of ammeters....

 

If you want to just take it out of the circuit and most danger, connect one terminal to the other. Doesn't matter which one you move.

 

THANK YOU! Most helpful!  :greetings-clappingyellow::greetings-clappingyellow:

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