Jump to content

Recommended Posts

10 minutes ago, cschannuth said:

Long story even longer, Duke was home and healing by the time the Clarkes made the trip to Michigan and the deal was done.

Great to have members help close a deal.    :text-bravo:This site is populated by so many great people.   

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, 953 nut said:

Great to have members help close a deal.    :text-bravo:This site is populated by so many great people.   

 

It would be tough to find a better guy than Denny Clarke.

  • Like 2
  • Excellent 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup Denny's a strait shooter and knows how to do a  mean 520 himself! Always nice to hear members helping members. I had no idea Duke suffered a stroke...prayers.

Nice work Craig

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, WHX12 said:

Yup Denny's a strait shooter and knows how to do a  mean 520 himself! Always nice to hear members helping members. I had no idea Duke suffered a stroke...prayers.

Nice work Craig

 

Thanks. Denny's 520 is nice. I bought his 701 from him last year. He is a craftsman. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got her back together. It's about a 20 footer but I like it. 

 

image.thumb.jpeg.fa3c2364ed2372ed591cb1540d2ac01e.jpegimage.jpeg.46ddbeb73dc2658c64e32cb9b9dcd094.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.ef01a3e2ef540a02de7301ef3002becf.jpegimage.jpeg.87d7eb89f94448e0310b13d612d106fe.jpeg

  • Like 5
  • Excellent 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, dclarke said:

Looks good, Craig! 

 

Thanks for the advice and the lead on the seat. It and the switch worked like a champ. 

I was wondering what the size difference would be compared to my 314-8 so I parked them side by side. 

 

image.thumb.jpeg.dd63223202f903c2efbdc76519e11da8.jpegimage.jpeg.04d7fb1176a5e63ae3962821277b512a.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That idler pulley shaft eating through the bushing can be a real problem. The transmission support tunnel is so thin that there is a cutting action on the bushing. It is in a hidden area, but you need to OIL THEM. I did a farmer repair with one of these--a bronze flange sleeve bearing.

https://www.fastenal.com/products/power-transmission-motors/unmounted-bearings/flanged-sleeve-bearings;jsessionid=B0ABBD78833CAB826C981A93157C9C4E.jvm3?r=~|categoryl1:"603582 Power Transmission 9and Motors"|~ ~|categoryl2:"610631 Unmounted Bearings"|~ ~|categoryl3:"612463 Flanged Sleeve Bearings"|~

 

   I happen to have a 400 series that is a newer tractor, and there is a gas shock which applies tension on the idler pulley. It is much superior to the little spring that tensions my 520,and belt flopping is not an issue. This tells me that Toro knew they had a problem with the tension spring being too short and stiff and therefore not a constant force spring. I finally found a solution to the problem. A strip of rubber band cut from a bicycle or motorcycle tube applies constant tension on the swing shaft and vibration is all but gone. It really does not take gobs of tension on the belt to drive that Eaton because of the tremendous mechanical advantage. Of course, I just mow my yard and don't push snow.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, cschannuth said:

 

Thanks for the advice and the lead on the seat. It and the switch worked like a champ. 

 

 

 

Good deal.....Bob Maynard told me about the bolt pattern being different than most and I have the same seat that's on his 416. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, ohiofarmer said:

That idler pulley shaft eating through the bushing can be a real problem. The transmission support tunnel is so thin that there is a cutting action on the bushing. It is in a hidden area, but you need to OIL THEM. I did a farmer repair with one of these--a bronze flange sleeve bearing.

https://www.fastenal.com/products/power-transmission-motors/unmounted-bearings/flanged-sleeve-bearings;jsessionid=B0ABBD78833CAB826C981A93157C9C4E.jvm3?r=~|categoryl1:"603582 Power Transmission 9and Motors"|~ ~|categoryl2:"610631 Unmounted Bearings"|~ ~|categoryl3:"612463 Flanged Sleeve Bearings"|~

 

   I happen to have a 400 series that is a newer tractor, and there is a gas shock which applies tension on the idler pulley. It is much superior to the little spring that tensions my 520,and belt flopping is not an issue. This tells me that Toro knew they had a problem with the tension spring being too short and stiff and therefore not a constant force spring. I finally found a solution to the problem. A strip of rubber band cut from a bicycle or motorcycle tube applies constant tension on the swing shaft and vibration is all but gone. It really does not take gobs of tension on the belt to drive that Eaton because of the tremendous mechanical advantage. Of course, I just mow my yard and don't push snow.

 

 That is very interesting. I was actually thinking that maybe I needed a new spring because the old one had lost its ability to provide enough pressure. How did you attach the rubber without it  easiky breaking?   The changes that I made by rebuilding with the original bushing have calmed the jumping belt enough that it doesn't slap the guard any longer but I can still see it in there jumping around more than it probably should. Thanks for the great insight. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No great insight, just trial and error brought forth by necessity. I was away from home and used what was laying around, but it worked better than OEM  Maybe I can get a picture of the garage queen 416 and its air piston spring.which also serves as a shock absorber and keeps the belt from vibrating

 

All I did was to put the band over the floorboard peg and cut a slit in the band so the bolt that holds the idler pulley to the swing shaft keeps it in place. My band is from a 3.5 " motorcycle tube and is about 2" wide. You could use about any bicycle tube and experiment with band width or double the number of bands in your assembly. Inner tubes are tough and last a long time.You can get a lifetime supply from just one tube

 

I also have a c141 auto and Wheel Horse used an angle iron against the transmission tunnel for the belt to ride over. The belt probably only deflects a half inch , but that seems to keep it from vibrating. The surface of the angle is polished mirror bright by the belt.

There are pre-drilled holes in the transmission tunnel on my 520, and it certainly looks possible to add another pulley in the path of the belt to calm it down some more.

 

When you think about it the manual transmissions have the clutch pulley to ride over to calm them down. Not so with the auto transmission

Edited by ohiofarmer
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Mikey the Monkey said:

Love the 5 ribs! That is BA

 

Thanks. I have the tri ribs on my 161 and I like these as much, if not more, than those. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think your rattle can paint job is pretty darn good.  I wish mine came out as nice.

  • Excellent 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, doc724 said:

I think your rattle can paint job is pretty darn good.  I wish mine came out as nice.

 

Thanks. You can't see all the imperfections in the pics but it looks decent and the metal is protected. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just catching up here Craig but looks good from here..... absolutely boss... :handgestures-thumbupright: with those tires! Rattle can or not looks good when the mud flies!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×