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kpinnc

Differences between the K161 and K181?

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Yeah you know I seen that also & never put it together. :D

Kevin the "Hawkeye" is right....that is a later style PTO pulley setup.

How about some pics of the tractor together before the tear down just out of curiosity? :P

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All I have to do now is figure out where THAT pulley came from. :D

I can't think of any "small block" tractors that used one like that.

Maybe it was manufactured ON a South Bend and not IN South Bend? :P

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That pulley does look pretty & shiney...should be old & rusty?

It may have come off a 1966 or later long frame...some of the early K241's had a 1" crank.

But then I've never had an early long hood yet know what the engine pulley looks like.

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Why don't we just ask... Kevin, what's the spec number on that engine?

I'm sure he would tell us, but as he said before -- there's no tag on the blower housing. :D

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I'm probably gonna pay for this, but I just realized something else. The drive pulley on your engine is not for an 867 either.

Whoa, Whoa, Whoa! :D I can explain that one fellas! The tractor had the 3 groove pulley on it. THAT is the setup when you use the old PT-(6 or7) aftermarket PTO kit from Wheel Horse. Yes, the pulley is shiny because it (pulley only) was NOS.

I put the PT-6 (or 7) PTO kit on the tractor. It is correct for the "era" of the 867.

I just don't have the little curved bolt "front pin" part on the engine in that pic. Kinda hard to remove the clutch plate when it's mounted.

Haven't quite figured out how to mount it on the Briggs 14 yet...

Kevin

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Come on Terry "hawkeye"...you mean you didn't catch that...LOL :D

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Actually, I don't think that's a very "normal" addition to those tractors. In that era, (1966 to ?) the PTO kits had to be bought separate for the "big block" tractors because they didn't come with a PTO.

I think the only real need for these on the early medium frame tractors was to run a tractor-powered tiller. (there was no way to start and stop them otherwise) All the other m.f. belt-driven attachments used the standard 3 groove pulley and the spring-loaded foot pedal tensioner arrangement.

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I think that's correct Terry. I got the kit for the singular purpose of using my tiller with it. Saw one mounted on another short frame tractor and thought it looked great!

One thing about me and my Wheel Horses: I can never leave well enough alone!

Of course, 8 hp may be stretching it a bit down here with the red clay and rocks... :D

Should work fine with the 14 hp twin though!

Kevin

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A startling discovery :D was made today while putting away the three Kohlers from yesterdays "score"......

I thought they were all 7hp, but I really didn't look that close. It was real cold -- and I was just happy to be getting them. Turns out one of them is a little different. This should be an easy one for a couple of you guys, but can you guess what this one is? (Ignore the cylinder head shroud -- it actually goes to another one of the engines.)

K141.jpg

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With out sounding like an idiot...wait that comes easy. :D

I'm going to say K161 pull start off a say a 633? :P

Let me down nice....... :(

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Stephen.....

Other than it being a K-141 (T), you are correct.

Now get out from under that chair! :D

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Terry does it have spark?

When I restored my 633 I gave up with the original motor & found another 633 correct motor that ran.

My original had a cracked stator...I hear they are a hard one to find?

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Well, to be honest with you, I just looked at the picture and I don't think it even has a coil! (no plug wire)

I have a couple different mag coils floating around here (even a few NOS ones :P ) and also have the parts from the K-181 that's in the B-80 now.

I'll have to investigate that tomorrow. (I was just glad to get the much needed starter cup!)

BTW -- the block is cracked and JB Welded on the opposite side from a rod failure at one point in this engine's career. It has new guts, so it must have been used again since it blew. :D

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You gotta love JB Weld.

I read once that the only two things a mechanic needs is WD-40 and duct tape. If it's not moving and it's supposed to, then used WD-40. If it's moving and it isn't supposed to, then use duct tape.

I think we can add JB weld to that small list. :D

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I have to admit ...I get spooked when I see a block repaired with it. :P

Thats just me though since I've heard all the good things about it & told it will last if applied correctley. :D

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This one has the damage typical of an oil-starved connecting rod failure. It must be their nature to "go to pieces" and wrap around the camshaft - with pieces getting wedged against the inside of the block -- which ultimately cracks them at the starter mounting bracket area. (not really critical on a recoil engine)

The K-181 that I just took off the B-80 still has a piece stuck in there, and it won't come out unless the cam is removed. :P The good thing about that one is the block didn't break. :D

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as long as its not a pressurized oil system I don't worry to much about JB weld fixes. Now if I just knew how to weld cast iron. I'm sure its simple, and boy do the guys around here make big bucks doing it :D

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ANYBODY that can stick weld can lay a bead on cast iron......

The problem is being able to heat the cast iron up properly BEFORE welding it, and allowing it to cool down at the correct rate so it doesn't become brittle and crack.

Some specialty shops even have "ovens" that enable the correct procedure, but, as you mentioned, it costs big bucks there.

Brazing (furnace brazing, actually) is another preferred technique for repair of non-stressed cast iron, but since there are so many different types of cast iron, that can be tricky too. Once again, the workpiece is heated to proper temperature and a gas-type torch is used along with a nickle-brass filler rod. Cool-down must also be controlled because of the high expansion/contraction properties of the cast.

Wow..... they taught me that 22 years ago and I still remember it????? :D

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You go with your bad self :P

I knew there was a trick to it, also knew that I had no Idea what it was :D

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I'd be leery of a welded block as well. There is simply no way something can be welded, and not induce some distortion into it. Maybe it'll affect nothing, and maybe the cam, main bearings, SOMETHING, isn't going to quite line up like they are supposed to.

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