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Green Slime - Anyone Using it in their Tires?

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I've got a couple of front tires that are leaking down and am curious as to if anyone is using green Slime tire sealant/repair in their tires.

 

Also curious as to what the rims look like several years after you use the stuff.

 

Where I mow, there are thorns and occasionally I get a flat.  I don't care for tubes because it's a pain to patch, whereas a tubless tire and a plug, for me, is simpler.  However, at some point, the tires get more thorn holes, start cracking from age or the bead starts to leak.  Slime looks like it can fix all that.

 

Do you use Slime - if so, do you like it.

 

If you've used slime, how did your rims look when you replaced the tire.

 

From the Slime website, they state that their tubless formulation has rust inhibitors to help prevent rim rust.

 

Thanks!

Bill

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Yes, I use Slime, don't know if it works cause I have not been getting flats on the Wheel Horses used in the woods (and lots of thorns), tires are inflated to 10-20psi, since I started using Slime.  Have not looked at the rims to know about Rust.

On the Wheel Barrows and 2-wheel trucks I have, yes, the air does leak out a little just over the Winter, where Air  is at 30-40psi in those smaller tires.  

 

For cars, don't use Slime:  We had a 2008 energy efficient dual-engine Saturn with that huge battery,  on the road when a tire got low on air,

we found that there was no spare ("to save weight"), no jack & no lug wrench.  They included a can of Air with Slime in the  trunk, called "Spare Tire", but if you do use that can, there is a $150 cleaning charge before the tire store can fix your flat on that tire, it must be sent to a special place, and may take up to 10 days.  Also, it was not a common tire size, so most service stations & small towns would not have a new tire in stock.

Note; that our "6-year battery life" only lasted 30-months, cost $2,900 to replace, and that its replacement guarantee was only for 18 months.

Edited by GlenPettit

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Never used it, but I always thought slime was for an emergency or last resort ,short term repair.   I know of people who use it long term.  just wondering what it really intended for???

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I HAVE NOT used it, but have heard guys really cuss the use of this product when they remove a tire with Green Slime in it.

It must be really nasty and messy, but as I said, I have not seen this 1st hand.

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I have used it in the past, I put the green stuff in the rear tires of the lawn tractor I was using at the time, well a few years later the tires would not hold air just plain worn out, I picked up a pair of tires and proceeded to swap them, what a MESS I had, nasty green goooo all over me and my driveway where I was changing them, after a pile of rags and some gas to wash the rims off, and me, clean the drive, I had 2 pretty rusty rims, since then I have started buying and selling tractors and parting them out, and have found slime in many rims all very rusty inside, I for one will not use it ever again, but with that said I did buy some tubes at a local store, Slime brand tubes prefilled with slime I got them on clearance for $2 each, so I bought them, I have one in my wheelbarrow tire so far so good.   

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I have used it and it works good! Yes its a mess to take the tire apart, but just use the hose to rinse it out.  It doesn't harm the tire and make it soft like fix-a-flat and have not seen rust on a rim from it yet. If your worried about the mess, buy a tube with slime in it. I have one tractor with slime tubes in the front tires and used it to clean up this mess.

 

052-5.jpg

058-2.jpg

062-2.jpg

 

needless to say I pulled a lot of ruffing nails out of the front tires and still have not added air to the tires. I was using the bagger with a blower cutting down low to pick up as much as I could and never got anything in the rear tires

Edited by smoreau

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I'm a believer in Slime. Used it many times and it works great for sealing small holes like thorns will cause. When changing a slimed tire, it just rinses out with water. Didn't see where it caused rust...it was probably there before the Slime.

IMO, it's not a "cure all" fix, but it does work and can save you money and time.

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I've also used it to seal beads on problematic tires.  Injecting it into the tire doesn't usually fix air leaking from the bead.  I dilute some with a small amount of water and apply it to the bead and it seals it up great.  I've done my hand truck, walk behind snow blower, in addition to wheel horses and they've held great for years.   

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terrible stay away! you will regret it when you have to change a tire. it creates a nasty film like scab on the rims and is a real pain in the @$$ to remove when you want to repaint the rims. I also would like to add that every rim I have found it in, the rim is not just rusty but in a decay like state. save yourself the trouble and just use the plugs seems like you have a unique scenario with the thorns just use caution.

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This is quite the unique topic here. There are completely polarized answers I must say. Definitely no middle of the road answers.... Im not sure why people hate it so much honestly. I have used it for years to seal wheel barrow tires, Scag zero turn tires, small pull behind yard trailer tires and have mounted and dismounted, painted and refurbed many wheels without the "scab" results Prondzy talks about or the need to use gas like Kelly has said. Now I'm not saying that these guys are wrong but my experience has been that its an excellent product if used in its niche. It has saved the need to replace or plug the tires on the crew of zero turns that my friend has in his fleet. Eight Scags to be exact. I change all his tires by hand with a harbor freight changer and  add slime when I change them. The rims aren't rusty, even on the 9 year old Turf Tiger 72. I wonder if it maybe exacerbates an already existing rust problem on rims? As far as clean up, even after a couple two-tree years in there I just need to hose the rims once I break the beads loose and pull the tires off. I honestly think it helps them come on and off the rims easier. It has definitely saved him money in having guys going I couldn't cut because I had a flat....

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This is quite the unique topic here. There are completely polarized answers I must say. Definitely no middle of the road answers.... Im not sure why people hate it so much honestly. I have used it for years to seal wheel barrow tires, Scag zero turn tires, small pull behind yard trailer tires and have mounted and dismounted, painted and refurbed many wheels without the "scab" results Prondzy talks about or the need to use gas like Kelly has said. Now I'm not saying that these guys are wrong but my experience has been that its an excellent product if used in its niche. It has saved the need to replace or plug the tires on the crew of zero turns that my friend has in his fleet. Eight Scags to be exact. I change all his tires by hand with a harbor freight changer and  add slime when I change them. The rims aren't rusty, even on the 9 year old Turf Tiger 72. I wonder if it maybe exacerbates an already existing rust problem on rims? As far as clean up, even after a couple two-tree years in there I just need to hose the rims once I break the beads loose and pull the tires off. I honestly think it helps them come on and off the rims easier. It has definitely saved him money in having guys going I couldn't cut because I had a flat....

What is the chance of multiple brands of tire sealant and everyone is calling them "Green Slime"?

I know some people get 18 MPG on their Chevy Z71, but I am lucky to get 15 MPG, so everyone has different results....no matter what the question.

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I HAVE USED SLIME FOR YEARS WITH NO PROBLEMS AT ALL. IT WASHES OFF WITH WATER AND WILL NOT HURT ANYTHING IT DOES NOT HARDEN UP. I HAVE USED IT ON SIDEWALLS WITH 20-30 PINHOLES AND A 3/16" SCREWHOLE. GO TO THEIR WEB SITE AND READ UP ON IT. IT'S GOOD STUFF

BOWTIE

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Has anyone ever used PneumaSeal? I have used it in my 4 wheeler tires and never had a problem with it. Harder to find but I think it's a  better sealer. Just my opinion.

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This is quite the unique topic here. There are completely polarized answers I must say. Definitely no middle of the road answers.... Im not sure why people hate it so much honestly. I have used it for years to seal wheel barrow tires, Scag zero turn tires, small pull behind yard trailer tires and have mounted and dismounted, painted and refurbed many wheels without the "scab" results Prondzy talks about or the need to use gas like Kelly has said. Now I'm not saying that these guys are wrong but my experience has been that its an excellent product if used in its niche. It has saved the need to replace or plug the tires on the crew of zero turns that my friend has in his fleet. Eight Scags to be exact. I change all his tires by hand with a harbor freight changer and  add slime when I change them. The rims aren't rusty, even on the 9 year old Turf Tiger 72. I wonder if it maybe exacerbates an already existing rust problem on rims? As far as clean up, even after a couple two-tree years in there I just need to hose the rims once I break the beads loose and pull the tires off. I honestly think it helps them come on and off the rims easier. It has definitely saved him money in having guys going I couldn't cut because I had a flat....

What is the chance of multiple brands of tire sealant and everyone is calling them "Green Slime"?

I know some people get 18 MPG on their Chevy Z71, but I am lucky to get 15 MPG, so everyone has different results....no matter what the question.

 

 

I was thinking the same thing as KC9KAS while reading this.  I haven't tore down a tire that had slime in it so I can't contribute as to how messy/easy to clean it is but I have used it in 4 wheeler tires with great success.  Bought some new tires (for a Honda ATV) that had beed in a garage for almost 10 years and they were old and a bit dry and just wouldn't seal so I put slime in them and stopped the leaks permanently.  At least I haven't put air in in years.

Hard to say slime rusts the rims unless you saw the condition of the rims before the slime was installed.  How many of these tires/rims had "fix-a flat" type temporary fixes added to the tires before the slime was used.  I think the biggest reason I would not use it is not being able to load the tires for weight - at least I wouldn't think you cound use both with good success.  

Definately a option for some but the next guy (if you ever sell the tractor/tires) might not appreciate you using it.

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See pic above. Nuff said.

You're correct Brandon, I didn't appreciate the crap when the owner complained that tire kept going down. What a mess. Took a long time to clean up.

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The green slime I use contains rust and corrosion inhibitors so it helps slow or prevent it for my rims.  A lot of air compressors don't dry out the air so the moisture is trapped and causes rust

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ac7ac04f-e4dd-4eb2-8c21-34a5cc62b496_zps

AAAaaaaaahhhhhh!!!  its the Green Slime!!!

 

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On 8/18/2013 at 10:42 AM, smoreau said:

I have used it and it works good! Yes its a mess to take the tire apart, but just use the hose to rinse it out.  It doesn't harm the tire and make it soft like fix-a-flat and have not seen rust on a rim from it yet. If your worried about the mess, buy a tube with slime in it. I have one tractor with slime tubes in the front tires and used it to clean up this mess.

 

052-5.jpg

058-2.jpg

062-2.jpg

 

needless to say I pulled a lot of ruffing nails out of the front tires and still have not added air to the tires. I was using the bagger with a blower cutting down low to pick up as much as I could and never got anything in the rear tires

Son.  Now that is a mess.  With a capital "M".

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When I have a aging tire that will not hold air anymore (dry rot) I tube it and forget it for like 10-15 more years..... then reuse the tube when I change the tire....  Note: Always clean the rim of any rust particles (sand and prime if necessary) and coat the tube with baby powder so that it installs evenly and easily.... do this and you will have absolutely NO problems... just saying..... 

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Funny how this thread is 2 1/2 years old and still interesting!  Still controversial, too!

 

Ah what the heck, I might as well jump in too.  I've used a gallon or so on off road tires and both love and hate it.  A bit aggravating to inject, real aggravating to remove later but yet I still use it in some cases.  If it was just a nail hole I would plug it.  It will buy some time on old cracked sidewalls, it will fix most slow leaks and small holes.  No idea what it does to rims long term but I have broken some tires down afterwards and noticed nothing but the slime, which does wash out without issue, just a bit of a hassle that tire repair shops really hate and will charge extra.

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Yep, I used it once!  That will be the last time!  Many other options I prefer!

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22 hours ago, Row Cropper said:

Yep, I used it once!  That will be the last time!  Many other options I prefer!

Hey fellow Ohioan!  Yeah, I live in upstate NY but was born in Cincy.  Slime is a love/hate thing for many.  For me it's just another tool that I use when appropriate for me.  But please feel free to elaborate:   "Many other options I prefer! "  Several for me as well but sometimes, time constraints, return on the time/dollar and "Oh what the heck" dictates some form of additive to get by.  New tire, new tube, patches and plugs are my preferred choices but I just wanted to know if I missed anything.  (I have, I do and perhaps now even more than before, miss stuff...  Over 60, forgive me please...)

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I've used in the tractor front tires, the wheel barrow and my mountain bike. When I was in the service (the late 60's):flags-texas:  I knew a guy on the base that used to ride his dirt bike in the dessert. He used evaporated milk in his tubes. He said it worked great and that was more that thirty years before SLIME. :twocents-02cents:

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It will make a mess and depending on what brand, it can also corrode the rim.  I bought an used rims last year off an old Sears.  One had that stuff in it and I had to wire brush it to remove the stuff.  I also seen pictures of similar stuff corroding the rims to where it almost corroded through.  I would highly recommend NOT using it if you want to save your rims.

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