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Greg B.

Hitches

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Refracman,

The more I study your pics, the more I appreciate some of the subtleties of the design. Do you have your hubs pulled out on the axle? I know that some full sized tractors have provision for this, but didn't know we did.

Kevin,

Thanks for the pics. That's one bodacious hitch you've got there! Your bottom braces, up to the frame, are what I was trying to communicate in one of my earlier posts.

It's beginning to look like Mith's fenders, Refracman's 3pt and a variation of Kevin's braces. (I know, I know, but I'm anal about things like that) I'll know more when I get her torn down. I'm too new at these things to have a familiarity with the different models and how they vary.

Thanks a lot, guys. Keep those cards and letters comin',

Greg B.

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Greg, thats the standard location on the hubs, and i agree the gt 14 used a nice design espeically when you utlize the hyd cyl on the 3 pt itself

and whats nice about haveing 1 1/8 axels is you can either use the 4(gt14), 5 (C series) or 6 (D series) lug hubs, im goin to put 6 lug on this gt and ues the D series rims to get the wider stance instead of going to dualies.

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Greg, there were all different lengths on the WH axles from one model to the other. The Eaton hydros and older Sundstrands even used two completely different lengths in the same tranny. I have ONE each of probably 5 or 6 different lengths of the 1 and 1/8th axles in my shop.

Some of the axles gave an inch or two extra between the case and hubs, or in the case of my Bronco 14, they only protrude about 1/4 inch (case to hub). I'm not sure why there were so many variations when the rest of the trannies were the same. my axles are 12 inches long from end to end.

You can use any of the 1 and 1/8th axles for your setup, even ones from a D160-D200, as they have the same splines cut on the end that goes into the differential. BUT, the D series axles (and I think the C-195s) were pretty long, somewhere around 16 inches. Though it would give you a wide stance and more room for the 3 point arms, the farther out you go from center, the more "leverage stress" you apply to the tranny case and bearings. If you're looking for strength, it's best to stay more narrow than wide. Of course, an inch or so like Refracman's is probably negligable.

I know where you can buy hardened axles, new from the machine shop, liscensed manufactured, and with whatever length and keyway type you want. They were manufactured after the original production run in a harder version than factory as warranty replacements on some of the earlier D series tractors. From what I am told, the backhoe attachments broke a few axles when they were used without lowering the outriggers. Reason? D series axles extend 4 inches or more beyond the axle housings. No way for me to confirm this story, but like I said, that's what I was told.

Trouble is, they cost over $300 + shipping. A little steep in my book...

Good luck, and if you find some cheaper axles, let me know! :D

Kevin

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Refracman,

Six lug on the D's and a wider stance. Hmmmm..... Yeah, I don't like tippy tractors w/FELs. Got the t-shirt AND the hat on that one. Case 540C. Layed that thing down just sweet as can be!

Is that a 2-1/2" x 4" cylinder? Sure seems like a chubby little critter.

Kevin,

Thanks for the axle tutorial. You explained much and answered some present and future questions.

Thankfully, I'm not in the market for axles. I can get Donovans for my Ford 9", for that kind of money!

Nick,

I owe you an apology. I inadvertantly missed responding to your post. Thanks for your response and the Ventrac link.

Thanks to all of you,

Greg B.

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You'll have to forgive me Greg. My wife says I have a hereditary disorder- I am lacking the "shut up" gene! :P

I love these tractors, and I just get carried away at times. Everything I know came from Martino's book, and the un-ending search for parts and more tractors!

And I've been humbled (in a good way) by this group and it's members. I've found out that I am indeed wrong sometimes! :D "Sometimes" sounds so much better than "often", don't it? :( These guys are awesome!

I'm looking forward to seeing your hitch configuration. You're definately putting alot of thought into it, and you can't go wrong making it stout!

Kevin

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Kevin,

In this case, the lack of that gene is a good thing. I've had many titles in my life, from ditch digger (literally) to CEO, but the one I'm proudest of is Student. You, and many others here, have taken time from your too short lives to teach me. For that I am eternally grateful.

My wife claims that I am still too young to have contracted "Old Timer's" disease, but I have come down with "Sometimer's" disease. Sometimes I remember and sometimes I don't!

I can understand your feeling for these tractors. I have the same obsession with steam locomotives. :D

I tend to be leery of people who are, seemingly, never wrong. If you don't do something wrong, once in a while, you're probably not doing anything. One thing I learned sitting around board (bored?) rooms and on the shop floor, is that there are many good looking, wrong, approaches to any problem.

It'll probably be Spring, before I go to metal, on this. Life keeps getting in the way. I will, however, make public, here, my drawings and the results. Positive or negative.

Thanks, again,

Greg B.

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Greg, the medical term you seek is halvesheimers.

Done only lost half my mind!! Both brain cells of it.

Dale

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