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mr.pipes

Cheap, Durable, Plastic Plow Wear Edge

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I saw a post about plow cutting edges and I remembered a site I was looking at before. Checked a few things and found this. It's a UHMW (Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene) strip 1/2" x 4" 48". You could rip it in half on the table saw and have two dirt cheap cutting edges. I am not an expert on plastics but this looks like a great candidate for the job.

http://www.amazon.com/UHMW-Sheet-48-Peacht...pd_sbs_indust_1

It has the highest impact strength of any thermoplastic presently made. It is highly resistant to corrosive chemicals, with exception of oxidizing acids. It has extremely low moisture absorption, has a very low coefficient of friction, is self-lubricating, and is highly resistant to abrasion (15 times more resistant to abrasion than carbon steel). Its coefficient of friction is significantly lower than that of nylon and acetal, and is comparable to that of Teflon.

I didn't look around for a cheaper price as this looked pretty good to me.

I am going to order some and use my router to make skid shoes for my snowblower.

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I will bet it doesn't do worth a darn when it comes to scrapping of concrete or asphalt. It might be resistant to chemicals blah, blah, blah,. Think about this, steel doesn't hold up all that well without grinding down to nothing and I doubt if this would hold up any better. Good Luck

See Ya, Bye Burly :banghead:

:thumbs:

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I will bet it doesn't do worth a darn when it comes to scrapping of concrete or asphalt. It might be resistant to chemicals blah, blah, blah,. Think about this, steel doesn't hold up all that well without grinding down to nothing and I doubt if this would hold up any better. Good Luck

See Ya, Bye Burly :banghead:

:thumbs:

Well I don't know about you but my windshield scraper is plastic and works pretty good. I have plastic shovels that seem to work as good as my metal ones. What do you scrape the ice off your windshield with? Do you use a putty knife?

Maybe I should have worded it different. The post was directed to people who have nice newer paved or concrete driveways who want to remove the snow without damaging the driveway. I am not a gambling man but I would bet you anything is does a great job in those situations.

As far as the chemical and corrosion resistance I could care myself. I was just including the info I found. When you read that did you skip over the 15 times more resistant to abrasion than carbon steel part. Or about the coefficient of friction being comparable to that of Teflon.

See ya, bye

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Personally myself I think that putting direct pressure downward is a whole lot different than scrapping something off on an angle

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For what it's worth....I used my METAL blade on my NEW concrete driveway and it didn't hurt it one bit. :banghead:

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For what it's worth....I used my METAL blade on my NEW concrete driveway and it didn't hurt it one bit. :banghead:

I don't loose sleep over hurting my driveway. However, I do see peoples driveways who use chains and they have scratches everywhere. My driveway also has scratches and rust marks from a plow. If you look at the higher sections of the roads where I live there are rust streaks that go the whole length of the road. If possible, I would rather not have them.

I know I'm a little anal about somethings and my driveway for some reason is one of them. I am definitely going to try it and will let you all know how it does.

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From what I can tell it looks very similar to what Warn Industries uses for plastic ATV plow wear bars but the material you found costs much less. Let is know how it works out. You may want to try the 3/4 inch UHMW instead of the 1/2 inch because that's what Warn is using on their ATV plows and it's only a few dollars more.

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Hey! I remember that stuff! :ROTF:

http://www.wheelhorseforum.com/index.php?showtopic=23894

Two years ago, I had to install a rubber (1.5" thick) cutting edge on the truck at work. Seems that they didn't like the idea of peeling off the $5000 worth of new seal-coat on the parking lot.

The downfall is that we now use three times the salt since the plow leaves about 1/2" of slippery packed snow behind. :thumbs:

Another case of "fat wallets" overruling common sense. :banghead:

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Hey! I remember that stuff! :ROTF:

http://www.wheelhorseforum.com/index.php?showtopic=23894

Two years ago, I had to install a rubber (1.5" thick) cutting edge on the truck at work. Seems that they didn't like the idea of peeling off the $5000 worth of new seal-coat on the parking lot.

The downfall is that we now use three times the salt since the plow leaves about 1/2" of slippery packed snow behind. :thumbs:

Another case of "fat wallets" overruling common sense. :banghead:

I was thinking the same thing. They don't call it a cutting edge for no reason. If you don't mind packed snow and ice on the driveway and don't mind lot's of salt by all means go for it.

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I was thinking the same thing. They don't call it a cutting edge for no reason. If you don't mind packed snow and ice on the driveway and don't mind lot's of salt by all means go for it.

Is there something here that I am missing or not seeing? Is there a reason that a plastic edge wont go through the last 1/2" of snow? That would be a down pressure issue not a material issue right? I use a plastic shovel on occasion and sometimes a metal one for cleanup and I am pretty sure they both get just as close to the ground.

As I said before I am a bit anal about cleaning the driveway and use a lot of salt as it is because I don't want ANYTHING left on the driveway. I make lots of trips to the truck loading tools and supplies in the dark. It's no fun going down on your elbow at 5:00 a.m. with a 60lb toolbox in hand.

I also do the same for my mothers as she is getting older. I don't need her falling because I didn't put $3 of salt on her driveway. Wednesday I was leaving a job and the woman walked me out to my truck. As she started to tell me about how she fell a week ago, she slipped right there and broke her wrist. I really don't want to deal with something like that if I can prevent it.

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Mr. Pipes, All I can say is "Go for it". Let us know how it works. I am old school. I to also own a plastic shovel but I use a metal one to get down to the concrete. Like I said I have had road rash from sliding across concrete and/or asphalt because of non-drivin, on second thought I will stop right there. They are just a little abrasive. Road rash bites to put it mildly. The plastic shovel shows wear. With downward pressure I think it will show even more wear, alot quicker than steel. I wish you luck and actually hope it works for you. Again please let us know. Thanks See Ya, Bye Burly :banghead:

:thumbs:

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Bringing this post back from the dead...

Mr. Pipes, how did this turn out? Did you end up trying it? I am in the process of making some skis for the thrower. I am using 2 inch angle and a cutting board to fab it up. Somewhat of a prototype if it works well. Curious how the UHMW poly worked out. I figured I would try to make something with a "borrowed" cutting board and some scrap iron. After all there is no snow coming this way for at least a week.

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I'm curious about this, too. I bet it would do OK as far as wear against the drive surface, but the stuff has a bad reputation for deforming and softening when drilled.

I would be afraid of cracking about the drill holes used to mount the strips. Interesting idea. Much cheaper than replacing the steel wear strip.

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I'm curious about this, too. I bet it would do OK as far as wear against the drive surface, but the stuff has a bad reputation for deforming and softening when drilled.

I would be afraid of cracking about the drill holes used to mount the strips. Interesting idea. Much cheaper than replacing the steel wear strip.

I was worried about this when I started with the plastic cutting board. I don't know how the cutting board compares to the UHMW poly. I'm not even certain what the cutting board is made of. Nylon? Polyethylene? Who knows. I cut it with a band saw, formed it over the kitchen stove to a ski shape, and drilled mounting holes while it was still very warm to the touch. It had to be heated very slowly as the surface had a tendency to vaporize in a hurry.

I'm curious about the wear of the plastic when using it on the plow. I'm using two 2 inch wide strips approximately 9 inches long for skis on the snowthrower. My concern is that the thrower is much heavier than the plow and it is riding on a much smaller surface area of plastic. I hope it doesn't burn up with the first use. Eek. My 312-8 does not have the height adjust on the shifter panel either. I wish it did. I do have 11 washers put on the flag, so it is barely touching the ground.

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When I worked for the state hwy dept here in Oregon we tried this same type of material out. We actually lined the whole plow plus the wing plow with it. The idea was to see if we could avoid the build up of slush on the plows. The plows were mounted to 4X4 white semi's with 12yd sander boxes on the back. After reading this post I called up the section foreman and asked how they were doing. He stated that they last about two winters and then have to be replaced. Not bad for 15 to 20k a winter plowing snow with volcanic cinders or road sand pelting it. We dont use salt here but do use a lot of sand. So for what it is worth i am picking up some rem's tomorrow and cutting them for skids on my blower, plow and atv plow just to see how it works. Best to luck to the author of this post and I look forward to the follow up. Chris

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I seem to remember a older post,with pictures, of someone adding plastic feet to the ST. dont remember how they turned out. not sure if they also were looking to add them to the edge of the ST. not sure how they would do that w/o having to drill mounting holes , as my ST doesnt have a replaceable edge on it, of course my snowblade does. I'm curious to see if it works, 2 winters use would be fine if it works w/o leaving a layer of snow/ice.

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I have done this with my blade on my D 180 and it works just fine the plastic is as hard as metal but seems to where alot better than the wear bar did just my 2 cents

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it gets brittle when cold so it needs to be backed up with steel. UHMW is good stuff, and cheep. I get and endless supply from a place nearby that installs it in semi trailers.

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Bringing this post back from the dead...

Mr. Pipes, how did this turn out? Did you end up trying it? I am in the process of making some skis for the thrower. I am using 2 inch angle and a cutting board to fab it up. Somewhat of a prototype if it works well. Curious how the UHMW poly worked out. I figured I would try to make something with a "borrowed" cutting board and some scrap iron. After all there is no snow coming this way for at least a week.

Hey chinoman:

I just posted a question you may be able to answer...

How did your skis turn out?

Got pics?

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Hi Guys,

I'm using skis on my blower this year made of HD polyethylene. I also bought very thick HDPE strips for my plow. I used thinner strips the past two winters replacing them each year. They are cheap compared to 300 dollars of blacktop sealer and the 4 hours with two helpers to apply it. (Got that right TT)!

:handgestures-salute: I don't use chains so my driveway stays nice for years between coatings.

95% of the time, if I plow the driveway after a storm, what little if anything is left on it melts with a little sunshine on asphalt. You cement guys don't have that luxury.

My thick pieces of HDPE should last a few winters. They don't get brittle and even with the weight of the plow, they hold up well.

I bought mine from GE Polymer Shapes but they have been bought out by a company called Sabic. I see they don't list the HDPE panels in anything but corrugated now.

Attached are pictures of the shoes I made for my blower using the thin HDPE. The plow cutting blade of HDPE is closer to half an inch thick. (Much thicker than what you see in the attached photos). I'll make shoes using the thick stuff for the blower when I have time. It's so thick, it will need heated to bend over the metal shoes.

The metal cutting blade is still the best if you don't worry about what your driveway looks like. I do after I seal it and it lessens as it fades. :)

Have a Great Christmas!

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Bringing this post back from the dead...

Mr. Pipes, how did this turn out? Did you end up trying it? I am in the process of making some skis for the thrower. I am using 2 inch angle and a cutting board to fab it up. Somewhat of a prototype if it works well. Curious how the UHMW poly worked out. I figured I would try to make something with a "borrowed" cutting board and some scrap iron. After all there is no snow coming this way for at least a week.

Hey chinoman:

I just posted a question you may be able to answer...

How did your skis turn out?

Got pics?

I have not finished both skis yet. Been doing the typical holiday stuff. I would much rather be tinkering in the garage and shed. Basically I am taking a piece of 2 inch angle iron and putting it over the top of the stock wheel horse feet. I cut slots in it just like the standard feet so I can adjust it up and down. I then cut a 2 inch wide strip of the cutting board I stole...um borrowed from the kitchen. I am putting it under the bottom of the stock feet. I melted the ends to bend upwards and drilled holes to mount it to the angle iron on each end. Basically I made a sandwich with the stock foot in the middle. I wanted the ski to angle upwards on the front and back to ride over bumps better.

Having said all of this, if it works out okay, I plan to completely remove the stock foot. I will take my piece of angle iron and cut the angle and bend the ends up slightly. Weld it in place, hack off what is essentially flat bar that is now hanging below my welded up end, then bolt on my piece of cutting board. I don't know if that makes any sense to anyone. Basically I will make an actual ski. Sorry I don't have CAD on my netbook, had to use paint instead. My first very basic attempt is more for checking how well the cutting board will work.

ski.bmp

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Hey chinoman:

Awesome repurposing of a cutting board!

I repurposed 2 cookie sheets to create a chain guard.

Check it out.

I have a cutting board I could sacrifice ( borrow) ......

I could see fashioning it into blower shoes.........

Keep me posted, please!

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Well there is no snow here so I got some work done on a ski last night. I finished my original build of sandwiching the stock foot. It did not go up high enough and left the blower about and inch and a quarter off of the ground. I scrapped it. I started building version 2...replacing the whole foot with my ski. It was a pain as my welder intermittently would stop feeding wire in the middle of a weld. I ended up welding with one hand and wiggling the circuit board inside the welder with the other. It made a messy weld, but I got it done. My gas regulator was not cooperating at first either, I had not used it in a long time as I typically only use it when I do stainless. Well after several hours of diagnosis, cutting, bending, drilling, and painting I finished one ski. I wanted to make sure it would work before I made a set.

Here are the pictures. Only using my camera phone. I painted with krylon cherry red. I plan to powder coat in the future. I'm just waiting for a free CL oven to pop up. I think they will work great with the replaceable plastic strip...now I just need snow. No scratched driveways!!

post-5795-0-61768900-1325285309_thumb.jp

post-5795-0-74728900-1325285311_thumb.jp

post-5795-0-14485700-1325285314_thumb.jp

post-5795-0-96293000-1325285315_thumb.jp

post-5795-0-11158000-1325285318_thumb.jp

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Hey chinoman:

Awesome repurposing of a cutting board!

I repurposed 2 cookie sheets to create a chain guard.

Check it out.

I have a cutting board I could sacrifice ( borrow) ......

I could see fashioning it into blower shoes.........

Keep me posted, please!

I followed your post. I like the creativity and the way you worked through the problems without quitting. I've used cookie sheets for many many things. Rarely, if ever, to make cookies. There is a guy about 10 minutes from me selling several snow blowers for everything from a Craftsman to a JD. Cheap too. After seeing your work I thought about going to pick one up to fit on a Horse and selling it. My next project is going to be the generator mount fabrication. I would like to sell them...or anything I make for that matter. Including these skis. I'm not looking to make a killing, I just like tinkering, and building. A powder coat oven would be nice....thinking out loud.

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