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formariz

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formariz

All tightly fitted.

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71_Bronco

I was wondering how you were going to address the missing wood in those "legs". Looking great!

 

Are you going to dowel them? Or some kind of pin? Or just rely on glue / tight fit?

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formariz
5 hours ago, 71_Bronco said:

I was wondering how you were going to address the missing wood in those "legs". Looking great!

 

Are you going to dowel them? Or some kind of pin? Or just rely on glue / tight fit?

With those "legs" on there is no missing wood. They are the wood that was missing.(first photo) They are going to be held on by "drawboring",  a technique using a through pin going through the entire joint, meaning the two mortise cheeks and the tenon. Hole is bored slightly off on the tenon in the direction  away from the shoulders . This way when pin is driven through it pulls tenon shoulders tightly against  mortise. The way that I incorporate that into the design  is that the pin is the center of the flowers in the ones I make.(third photo)

Let me also explain why it is done this way. One could make the entire yoke of one single board which would include the parts that I added. However several problems arise from that.

1- The board for this particular style of yoke would have to be at least 24" wide. That is very hard to find. Some other style of yokes are actually almost 36"tall.

2-If it is made from one entire board , those parts on the bottom that fit around oxen's neck  have short grain and would snap off right away. That is the reason for adding these pieces using grain perpendicular to grain of yoke and the big tenon used. Although typically they were not glued since that was not available, if one glues it then it becomes even stronger since it will be really one piece. If glue is successful joints will never break at the glue joint but rather they will break somewhere else. The glue joint will be actually much stronger than the wood itself.

There are a "few" examples from the mid 1800s that were made in one piece. Very few however survived without at least one of those parts breaking off. I own an example like that as shown on second photo.

 

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formariz

Starting to get to the final shape.

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formariz

She now has its identity. Final shape. It is now about a quarter of the way through.

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rjg854

It's really taking shape, now :handgestures-thumbupright:

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tunahead72
3 hours ago, formariz said:

... It is now about a quarter of the way through...

 

Beautiful!  What else is left to do?

 

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formariz
2 hours ago, tunahead72 said:

 

Beautiful!  What else is left to do?

 

Thank you. Quite a bit left to do. Although it will not be as intricate as the last completed one on photo you get an idea of what is left. Carvings are identical on front and back. This one now is just a blank slate. Someone asked me one time how long it takes to do one .I never kept any record of  the  time it takes. If I started keeping time I probably would get discouraged and never finish them. Its not really a sprint but more like a marathon. 

111.jpg

 

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squonk

Amazing work! :occasion-xmas:

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squonk
On 2/16/2021 at 4:22 PM, formariz said:

In case someone complains that this has nothing to do with wheel horses :hide:

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:hilarious:Awesome Cas! :ROTF:

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ebinmaine

Agreed. Nicely done. 

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formariz

Ends are heavily tapered towards top and a bit towards bottom. A metal piece is shaped and mortised flush on each end. It is a reinforcement. Now metal pieces have to also be shaped with a matching taper as yoke. Typically they are steel , however I am partial to brass or bronze.

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formariz

On this I will use a power tool. My jigsaw with a metal blade to rough cut taper on metal . From here it will be all done with a file.

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tunahead72
1 hour ago, formariz said:

On this I will use a power tool...

 

We won't tell. B)

 

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squonk
13 hours ago, tunahead72 said:

 

We won't tell. B)

 

First time I ever saw a jigsaw in a vise! :banana-wrench::auto-ambulance:

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formariz

Brass pieces are to be precisely shaped in all directions. They are to be set in flush with wood. One more to go.

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DennisThornton

Inlaid?  Wow!  You got some work ahead of you!  Lots of end grain to contend with!

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formariz
8 minutes ago, DennisThornton said:

Inlaid?  Wow!  You got some work ahead of you!  Lots of end grain to contend with!

Lol. Yes that will be one of the fun parts. Shaping metal is also a tedious affair. Important also not to twist it. Slowly with lots of heat and trial.

 

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DennisThornton
7 minutes ago, formariz said:

Lol. Yes that will be one of the fun parts. Shaping metal is also a tedious affair. Important also not to twist it. Slowly with lots of heat and trial.

 

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I would have thought all bent cold around different forms.  I see signs of trial since it fits good but no signs of heat?

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formariz
1 hour ago, DennisThornton said:

I would have thought all bent cold around different forms.  I see signs of trial since it fits good but no signs of heat?

Those dark marks are burns. Have to be careful not to make deep ones. I leave center of thickness slightly rounded so as to hot bar only touch center since that will be removed in the inlaying process. I heat it and bend it off the piece by eye only placing on it briefly to try it.Cold bending is more difficult and has tendency to make “kinks” on brass. With heat it will bend into smooth curves easily like spaghetti. Also important not to damage face while applying pressure. 

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DennisThornton
14 minutes ago, formariz said:

Those dark marks are burns. Have to be careful not to make deep ones. I leave center of thickness slightly rounded so as to hot bar only touch center since that will be removed in the inlaying process. Cold bending is more difficult and has tendency to make “kinks” on brass. With heat it will bend into smooth curves easily like spaghetti. Also important not to damage face while applying pressure. 

So you formed the brass right on the "form"?  With fairly low propane torch heat?  I've bent a lot of iron and steel but not any brass like that.  How hot do you think the brass gets?

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formariz
8 minutes ago, DennisThornton said:

So you formed the brass right on the "form"?  With fairly low propane torch heat?  I've bent a lot of iron and steel but not any brass like that.  How hot do you think the brass gets?

Right. The most accurate form is the actual piece. I use a MAP gas torch. I don’t know what the actual temperature the brass gets to , but sometimes depending where on the piece I need the bend I merely heat it up on the air to the point that it starts bending by itself just from the cantilevered weight. I can actually see it bend and am able to fully control it by just moving it around a bit. Now it’s a great time to do it since for cooling it I merely open the door and place it on the snow.

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DennisThornton
4 minutes ago, formariz said:

Right. The most accurate form is the actual piece. I use a MAP gas torch. I don’t know what the actual temperature the brass gets to , but sometimes depending where on the piece I need the bend I merely heat it up on the air to the point that it starts bending by itself just from the cantilevered weight. I can actually see it bend and am able to fully control it by just moving it around a bit. Now it’s a great time to do it since for cooling it I merely open the door and place it on the snow.

Didn't know that brass got so agreeable with such low heat from a hand propane or MAP torch.  Never needed to know I guess.  I pictured a mandrel, lots of grunts and considerable checking and correcting!  I like your way better...

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formariz
16 minutes ago, DennisThornton said:

Didn't know that brass got so agreeable with such low heat from a hand propane or MAP torch.  Never needed to know I guess.  I pictured a mandrel, lots of grunts and considerable checking and correcting!  I like your way better...

Nothing like steel. Note that two major components of it are Copper and Lead. The higher the lead content the softer it is. The Rockwell hardness on it is usually 30 to 40 depending again on the lead content.As a matter of fact I sometimes shave the edges of brass bars up to 1/4” thick with a low angle block plane. It is my favorite metal to work with which many times I incorporate into my work. 

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