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rustyoldjunk

This is why you should always store your WH inside...

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rustyoldjunk

I saved it from a trip to the scrap yard. The 3 point is a plus.

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Edited by rustyoldjunk
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speedyleedy

Wow that's a real shame :angry-nono:

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Geno

You did great, always good to save a Horse.  :text-+1:

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Theroundhousernr

Worth saving any wheel horse, but especially a gt14. Lots of usable parts there. Good score on the three point.

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Firpo701

Oh wow!!! Good save!!! Started to buy a gt14, but opted for the 953 instead...:-)

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JERSEYHAWG /  Glenn

Very galant. And another project. Best of luck.

Glenn

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neil

That is heartbreaking to see them in that condition

Great save

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rustyoldjunk

I agree Neil. Take a look at the custom pulley work on the flywheel side of the engine so they could use a rope to start it.

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Molon_Labe

You'll get bonus points for saving that one r-o-j !!! Glad you found it.

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cruisnblue48

It is a shame how many of these tractors were abused. Some of them just need a lot of TLC but they can be brought back to live a second life.

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meadowfield

Always worth saving :thumbs:

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MalMac

546cowboy you nailed that one. I wrote a long winded reply about todays generation. I decided to delete it, did not want to open a can of worms. So I will say it again you nailed it cowboy.

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rustyoldjunk

Lynn and MalMac,I agree with a lot of your sentiment but surprisingly,this tractor was owned by a older man for the last 20 years who fixed it "as he pleased" and obviously with almost no knowledge of how these things work.

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bmsgaffer

 I agree with your sentiments about it generally being a throw away society. I'm 28 and love saving old iron tractors, but I'm forced to buy a new phone every couple of years because its how they designed it. :scratchead:

 

And I know there are several younger than me on here that have an even stronger desire to fix and save than I do, so don't start writing off whole generations, its not their fault. It was the society that raised them (not any generation in particular, its always transforming!)

 

All we can do is try to teach the ones that will listen about the value of saving and repairing things. Show them how, and give them the time to try. "Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day, teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime" (and teach his children and friends how to fish too!) <The often missed part of that old proverb. :handgestures-thumbsup:

 

My wife and I will be raising our kids to learn to fix, donate or reuse whatever they can.

 

:handgestures-thumbupright:  :flags-usa: 

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cheesegrader

It's not just the education system that is failing.

People just aren't exposed to anyone with practical knowledge of how things work any more.

I learned just as much from helping my grandfather and father fix things on a dairy farm as I did in 27 years of school.

Most people look at that ttactor as junk because thay have never seen anyone fix anything like it.

Rustyoldjunk is one of a very small and shrinking tribe with the experience to know "Yeah, I can fix that!"

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Geno

Since the worms are already out I'll just agree with everything.  :handgestures-thumbsup:   The world is mostly going you know where in a great big hand basket!  :eusa-doh:

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Kegler

Great to see another one saved, 3 point alone makes it worth the effort + u'll have a real beast if you restore it! Looks like you need an E-Tank to deal with the rust.

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Tom.

Glad to hear you found it and saved it. Those Gt14s are beats and the three point linkage setup is a bonus!

I'm not wanting to take the thread too off topic but I agree with what has been said about some of the current generation not being very practical or not having the desire to repair and fix something and instead just having the "We will just buy a new one" attitude when something breaks. Personally, I love repairing and preserving these vintage garden tractors and with my being only 16 years of age it seems quite rare people my age are into this sort of thing, which is a shame really as I think it's a very enjoyable hobby that can teach you a lot of useful skills.

Tom

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John Galt

I can tell you the worst thing is to park them outside or under a tarp. Ruined my commando 8 during a construction project that took 9 months. Had to take it to auction. I did keep a lot nos parts I had been collecting for a restoration. Sheet metal, bracket's, wheels; almost a whole tractor. So when the time comes, I'll rebuild the motor I kept before sending it away and get a frame from another salvage tractor . My 633 is inside but my GT14 is outside for now.

As far as the current world goes. Find a quality hand tool to fix something. Yea they're out there, but more and more the tools are junk made outside the U.S.A. as well. Friends an neighbors ask me what I think of the 27 hp. lawn mowers at big box stores. I smile as and say my tractor is as old as me "633" and still working. Not sure those box store tractors will make two years: they typically don't, in our type of terrain.  Sad we're becoming less capable in the "make it work categories" in our society.  Helped put a camshaft in a ford jubilee in a tobacco field when I was 14.

Edited by John Galt
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DougL3

It's only going to get worse with the total lack of mechanical knowledge of this new generation. The emphasis on "new" instead of "tried and true" is much better in today's society. Forget the fact that the average age of vehicles on the road it 11 years or that the average cost of a new truck is $31,000.

 

You know a friend of mine brings up the fact that the high school he went to was a technical school. When you went there you learned a trade and got an education at the same time. Of course that high school no longer exists. Seems like teaching our sons and daughters something they can actually use later in life has gone out of style today.

 

With all the liberals controlling the schools and curriculum it's more important to be socially aware and tolerant than educated for a useful life. It's just a sorry statement by those who control our educational system.

​My kids are only in the 2nd and 3rd grade, but they are so far ahead of their classmates in hands-on activities, problem-solving, and reading.  Those boys help me with EVERY project from the tractor, small engine stuff, to plumbing and carpentry.  They help me with the garden and the chickens...the youngest even asked me the other day if I would still be proud of him if he decided to become a farmer instead of a police officer.  These boys are amazing!

I grew up learning every aspect of home building from my grandfather.  He also taught me how to repair everything he owned, because his generation FIXED things instead of throwing them away.  That has carried over to me and will be passed to my boys.  I piss my wife off weekly with the "broken" things I bring home to fix.  Never owned an edger before, but I've got $5 in the one I fixed this weekend!

In high school I took 4 years of mechanical drafting, 4 years of carpentry...was the student teacher my senior year, and competed in VICA competitions for both all 4 years.  I went on to get an AAS in Criminal Justice, which led me to becoming a police officer.  After 4 years I wised up and became a Fireman!  

I'm not a rich man, but I am a happy man!  I just hope my kids can keep their head in the game and not get caught up on the liberal bandwagon.  Oh, don't ask the boys their opinion on the current administration...unless you have time to pull up a chair and listen!

Long winded, off topic rant over!

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RedRanger

It's only going to get worse with the total lack of mechanical knowledge of this new generation. The emphasis on "new" instead of "tried and true" is much better in today's society. Forget the fact that the average age of vehicles on the road it 11 years or that the average cost of a new truck is $31,000.

 

You know a friend of mine brings up the fact that the high school he went to was a technical school. When you went there you learned a trade and got an education at the same time. Of course that high school no longer exists. Seems like teaching our sons and daughters something they can actually use later in life has gone out of style today.

 

With all the liberals controlling the schools and curriculum it's more important to be socially aware and tolerant than educated for a useful life. It's just a sorry statement by those who control our educational system.

​My kids are only in the 2nd and 3rd grade,.  Oh, don't ask the boys their opinion on the current administration...unless you have time to pull up a chair and listen!

Long winded, off topic rant over!

:handgestures-thumbupright:  :laughing-rofl:

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