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I wanted to post a picture of what I had bought to paint with.

They were around $120.00 for the set .I deicided that I liked

using the touch up gun best

HVLP DeVilbess starting line spray guns

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I added the desposable D-CUPS to make clean up easier :ychain:

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I like this setup as I can only paint a limited amount of parts at one time

and having the smaller cup (9oz) works out well

Now all I have to do is learn to use it correctly :thumbs:

:thumbs2:

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Brian, you'll really like that set of spray guns. :thumbs: Your doin' a great job with the tractor. :thumbs2:

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Fantastic job on the tractor. What a great job for your first restore. Thanks for all of the pics!

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The progress is looking good Brian :thumbs: I finish line by devilbiss and like it alot! :thumbs2:

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Got the lift arm done

new stainless push rod and spring

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the frame was cracked around the lower bolt hole's

so I welded a 6.5 x6.5 .125 thick plate of steel on the inside

kinda hard to see it after it was painted

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New stainlees steering shaft and support with bushing installed

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I cut the rivets off this idler pulley and took it apart

wrote a program to machine this stainless steel ring with a tapped 6-32 bolt

circle also opened the hole dia. up for clearance on a 6-32 socket head bolt

bought a bearing (std 6200 bearing) and put it back together with stainless bolt's

Back

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Front

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:thumbs2:

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You machinist are unbelievable! Sounds like you might be on to something - maybe a new buisness venture?? You can't go wrong with stainless, no matter where you put it on a tractor!

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The threaded rod and jam nuts I ordered from mcmaster-carr came

so I assembled the new tie-rods I made with 5\8" stainless and

ends from TSC

100_3283.jpg

:thumbs2:

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Time to repair and paint the leaking gas tank

After the tank was taken apart I sandblasted both halves inside and out

I wanted the inside done just in case I might need to use some tank sealer

and the sandblasted surface would give it good adhesion :thumbs2:

The first thing was too remove a broken bolt

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You can't see the threads in this pic but I got the bolt out and didn't hurt the

threads I also chased all the holes with a 8-32 press form tap

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New stainless 8-32x1/2" screws

I'am using self threading because they have a built in washer

1/4 nut driver

And the secret ingredient YAMAHABOND #4

also have new tank gasket #4452 from toro

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flat file all mating edge's check for burr's and besure tank bottom sits flat on tank top apply yamahabond to all mating surface's (tank top,tank bottom and both

sides of gasket

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All bolted together I like using the nutdriver because I can feel what I'am

doing better And tight is tight and to tight is broke

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24 hour leak test half full of gas

NO LEAKS

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primed for paint

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Done and Painted

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  • Like 2

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Brian: Your repair work and pictures posted on it will help out a lot of restorers of Wheel Horses. This is the type of posting that draws more people to this web forum! Great works! :thumbs2:

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Great job Brian

I'm trying to do the same kind of a fix & repair, was wandering where you got the

Yamabond at? Have you used it before with success?

Thanks Gary B.

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Great job Brian

I'm trying to do the same kind of a fix & repair, was wandering where you got the

Yamabond at? Have you used it before with success?

Thanks Gary B.

yamabond #4 is available at your local yamaha motorcycle dealer

it is used to seal motorcycle engine cases that are metal to metal. The stuff is magic !! I used it all the time back in my motocross years when I was

rebulding mine and everybody else's bike in the neighborhood. never had

a engine leak and I use it on the job at the machine shop for machine repair's

oil and gas has no affect on it

:thumbs2:

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This is turning out to be a great post. Really awesome job. When I retrace threads, I usually use a cutting tap, not a roll tap. I suppose it would make things that are loose, a bit tighter. Good idea. :thumbs2:

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This is turning out to be a great post. Really awesome job. When I retrace threads, I usually use a cutting tap, not a roll tap. I suppose it would make things that are loose, a bit tighter. Good idea. :thumbs2:

Chris

thread former's also help to keep from cross threading as they tend to follow the

threads better than a cutting tap

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Chris

thread former's also help to keep from cross threading as they tend to follow the

threads better than a cutting tap

OK, for us non-machinist dummies out here - what are the differences between the two types of taps? :thumbs2:

Always trying to learn something new.......

Duff :ychain:

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Hi Duff

they are pretty much what they sound like

A cutting tap cuts the metal out of the hole to make threads

A form tap moves metal or desplace's metal in the hole to make threads

thread forming taps require a larger dia. hole to start with than cutting taps

In some materials formed threads are stronger than cut threads as the grain

of the material follows the thread pitch instead of being cut through.

thread former or roll-taps as some call them work well as thread chaser's

because they normaly won't cross thread like a cutting tap. as they don't cut they follow precut threads.

hope this helps :thumbs2:

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Great explanation - thanks, Brian! :ychain:

I've got a set of cutting taps I've used with moderate success and yes, it is easy to cross thread when chasing damaged threads. :thumbs2: May have to look into a set of form taps.....

Duff :thumbs:

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hey man i got a question, got any plans on those hood pieces you made one of my round hoods needs new sides and it would be nice if you had some measurments, or even if you could make me a set :thumbs2:

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hey man i got a question, got any plans on those hood pieces you made one of my round hoods needs new sides and it would be nice if you had some measurments, or even if you could make me a set :thumbs2:

They are very easy to make if you have access to a sheet metal brake

I started with two strips of metal(around .021 not sure of the gage size)

1" wide and 24" long you can trim the length with tin snips when you install it

Scribe a line 1/4"up along the length and put the part in the brake up to the line

clamp and bend .you can bend way past 90 degree's

next place the other strip of material inside the angle you just bent put it back in the brake turned around 180 from the first bend and use the clamp to finish folding the bent angle down

on top of the other piece of material(this other piece of material represents

the hood so you are left with gap to fit over the edge of the hood)

next with the other piece of material still between the folded over angle

place it on a arbor press and use a 4" block of steel or alum. on top of the fold

and finish flating out the fold by pressing down then move it 4" and repeat

down the hole length you can do this with a hammer and the block of steel

if you don't have a press

Repeat for second part :ychain:

:thumbs:

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wooohooo thanks man!..i have all the parts and tools needed luckely!..got any close up pics of those so i have an idea that im doing it right?..thanks

Sorry the ownly pic I took is in this thread :thumbs2:

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parts are looking red :thumbs2:

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100_3208.jpg

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100_3210.jpg

Next I'll be putting the transmission back together

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All the bearings and seals have been installed in both case halves

100_3274.jpg

Need to remove bearing #1518 from input shaft #3522 Used 1/8 carbide end mill

to cut a slot in the old bearing

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Old bearing fell out after cut ready to press in new bearing

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This pic shows all the transmission parts numbered in the order they are

installed in the narrow case half for those who have never done this

100_3277.jpg

I started with the case sitting on it's bottom like when it on the tractor

Install

#1 #3522 input shaft

#2 #3903 brake shaft

#3 differential and axle's with bolt head's towards large gear on brake shaft

at this point I turned the case up on it's end

#4 #cluster shaft with all gears on shaft

#5 #4204 reverse idler and #3909 pin

#6 #3907 spline shaft with #3523 (hi inter.) gear #3524 (low & reverse) gear

and rear shifting fork and rail#3516 half moon scallops on shaft must

face towards front of transmission with the shifting fork in it's groove in

the hi-inter. gear #3523 install the #3907 spine shaft in the bearing on

the end of the #3522 input shaft and the shift fork rail #3516 in the rear

bore for the shift rail line up the middle scallop on the rail with the cross

hole in the rail bore holes. At this time

also remove gear #3526 and snap ring from #3907 spline shaft and

#3527 gear from #3910 cluster shaft

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#7 put a small dab of grease on one 1/4" ball and put it front rail bore until

falls in to the cross hole then drop the spring and rod in thru the cross hole

from the end of the transmission case

(I used a drill bit but any 3/16" dia rod will work I think the next one I do

I'am going to use a 3/16" tee handle allen wrench)

add a small dab of grease to the end of the rod and stick the other 1/4"

ball on it and place it on the spring in the cross hole

100_3279.jpg

#8 now slide #3524 gear (low & reverse )out near the end of the spline shaft

and add the front shifting fork and rail #3515 in the groove in #3524 gear

next slide the gear and front shift rail back until the rail starts in the front

rail bore STOP

push down on the rod to compreess the 1/4" ball and spring then slide the

front shift rail in until it touch's the rod keep pushing on the front shift rail

as you remove the rod the shift rail should slide down in it's bore to

line up with the rear shift rail reinstall snap ring and gear's #3527 & #3526

100_3280.jpg

different angle

100_3281.jpg

I used yamabond on both case halves and placed the gasket on the thick half

as it has the alignment dowel pin's (it will help hold the gasket in place)

then I placed the the case half with all the gears in my lap and slid the thick half down on it a couple of lite taps from a dead blow hammer and it came together

I then put it on the bench and bolted together with new stainless hardware

100_3282.jpg

last thing was a over spray of rustolem gloss clear

100_3284.jpg

:thumbs2:

  • Like 1

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Finally got a chance to start tearing down on the engine

100_3359.jpg

I wasn't sure if I was going to get the pulley off at first sence the engine had

sat outside for so long the shaft and pulley were very rusty.First I removed the

set screw and filled the hole with pb blaster and sprayed the shaft .Then I

tightened the gear puller as much as I dared. nothing moved I was getting ready to get the torch when I heard a loud TINK!! I thought no way but yes I tried

to turn the bolt on the gear puller and the pulley moved :thumbs:

100_3362.jpg

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Head off and oil drained ready to remove the bottom

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fairly clean inside

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valve's and camshaft removed and all washed and ready for inspection

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sizing up the bore Looks good minumal wear

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checking the piston wear

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engine tore down

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after checking all piece's for size I will be ordering the following

1 std piston & rings

1 std rod

1 exhaust valve

1 intake valve

4 new valve stem spring keepers

1 gasket overhaul kit

2 crankshaft seals

2 crankshaft bearings

both valve guides checked good

After checking price's the damage looks to be around $250.00 for all original kohler replacement parts

I will be doing all the labor (valve grind & lap cylinder hone etc. etc.)

:thumbs2:

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Brian, the transmission looks great and I am glad to see the engine apart :thumbs2: Cant wait to see it completed :thumbs:

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Awesome work BuckRancher. :thumbs2:

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