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Tractor boy

What is my charging load ?

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So I’m going to be adding aux lights on my 1986 312-8. Prob one one the back and and one on the front with maybe another one in the front. But I’m having trouble finding how much I can load on the battery. So could someone walk me through this process so I can do it in the future? And I’m sure y’all are going to want pics and updates wich will be coming soon! 😀😀

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Well, I can't really give you any help with the answer that you're looking for but I too am curious so I'm going to follow along.:popcorn:

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The 1986 312-8 has a 3 amp unregulated dual circuit charging system so it is maxed out with the lights it already has. The only way to get beyond that limit is to replace the stator and add a 15 amp regulator.

 

Garry

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32 minutes ago, gwest_ca said:

The 1986 312-8 has a 3 amp unregulated dual circuit charging system so it is maxed out with the lights it already has. The only way to get beyond that limit is to replace the stator and add a 15 amp regulator.

 

Garry

What if I were to not use the factory lights? Or replace those with less? Would that affect anything? 

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47 minutes ago, gwest_ca said:

The 1986 312-8 has a 3 amp unregulated dual circuit charging system so it is maxed out with the lights it already has. The only way to get beyond that limit is to replace the stator and add a 15 amp regulator.

 

Garry

 

14 minutes ago, Tractor boy said:

What if I were to not use the factory lights? Or replace those with less? Would that affect anything? 

 

 

 

Or what about replacing with LEDs that use next to no electricity?

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The DC lights you have now are running on AC current which sounds odd but works. You have likely noticed they only work when the engine is running and the faster it revs the brighter the lights. They are wired directly to the flywheel stator. Don't know what you could replace them with that would be an improvement.

I would not want to use LED lights because they require DC current which you do not have.

 

Garry

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Okay. This is what I’m thinking running a separate circuit for the auxiliary lights and only connecting to the tractors battery. Would a higher voltage battery effectively “ramp up” the voltage so I can run this or is that just wrong?

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You can not go to a higher voltage battery because the rest of the tractor uses a 12 volt system. You could go to a higher capacity battery which just means it will hold a charge longer and take longer to go dead. You still just have 3 amps charging it so it would likely never return to it's higher capacity.

A battery is designed to start the engine and that's it.

The charging system is designed to replace the engery used in starting the engine and maintain the charge so it can start again next time. With this model that is it.

The lighting circuit has it's own stator which covers the only other electrical load on the tractor.

 

Garry

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Posted (edited)

Depends on how long you want to run the lights and how much they draw.  You seem to have a battery coil ignition which is drawing current all the time 1-2 amps.  that only leaves an amp or so to recharge your battery after cranking.  If you have a healthy battery  you could run some lights I have a set of LEDS that draw 18 watts.  That would draw about 1.5 amps.  Over several hours you would probably drain the battery.  Bottom line 12 watts equals  1 amp and that is about all you have to play with.  But with a good battery  and you would be willing to put it on a charger periodically you could have some lights.

lights.JPG

Edited by pfrederi

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measure the voltage when running wide open. take the ameter reading on a good meter. return slowly to  idle & lookfor the voltage to return to lowest.  repeate the procedure with lites on  ( if applicable)

    the WATTS of out put ,, is what charges the battery in the long run. these systems were designed for CONTINIOUS RUNN applications,, so there is time to fully  charge . hence,, big amps just arent there .       36 WATTS ,, is plenty to charge the system in a 1 hour runtime,, asuming 12V at startup.    a 2amp trickle charger puts out a lot less & can top off in 4 hrs.

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So I thought about this some more today. Garry pointed out that the battery would die if the lights were used for a hour or so. What if I only used the lights for about half a hour or so the couple times a winter I plow my driveway?

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Build a tray mounted on the rear. Get yourself a deep cycle 12 v  battery and put it in the tray.Hook only your auxiliary lights to it. Now you will have added weight for plowing, power for your lights and your regular battery will charge and restart the the engine. When your done plowing, hook up a trickle charger to the aux. battery.

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