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I busted the grease zerk under the front end.  I have removed the the entire arm.  I have snapped 3 bits trying to drill it out to get an easy-out in it.  Any suggestions from someone who has done this before?  I have replaced zerks on other equipment before, but nothing with this much trouble.

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Try using a carbide bit.  You can get a carbide glass bit at most hardware stores. Use a steady supply of oil or some coolant to keep the bit cool. 

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:text-yeahthat: or a carbide masonry bit. Unlike a HS bit, speed & pressure is your friend with carbide.

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I've had luck with left hand drill bits. Never tried on a grease fitting though.

Harbour freight???

My place is called princes auto.

 

Nothing from the peanut gallery please. :banana-rock:

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I've been around the block once or twice and you all know the "Zerk" but it was new to me. Learn somthin new every day

 

Zerk fittings were patented to Oscar U. Zerk in January 1929. In fact, Alemite Manufacturing Corporation was the assignee in this instance. This is why Zerk fittings are also known as Alemite fittings.

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1 hour ago, The Gman said:

My place is called princes auto.

 

Nothing from the peanut gallery please. :banana-rock:

 

:confusion-shrug:.....we’d never do that :rolleyes: ! Thanks @Chris G  learned something new today.

 

@Walhonding520:handgestures-thumbupright: Good luck with that Alemite fitting . Only other suggestion I would have is maybe some heat and let cool .

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ACman your welcome but I don't know what I taught you LOL

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Got it. Tried the reverse thread bit (or as my grandpa called them easy outs).

Glam- thank you for the history lesson. All these common things we talk about regularly have a history and it’s always interesting to hear it.

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