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Sarge

Favorite hand tools/brands

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We sell Milwaukee but that doesn't mean I'm biased. Really it doesn't.  I've got tons of DeWalt and even though I think, well, I'm sure Milwaukee power tools are better I'm not dumping all my DeWalts!  The only reason I mentioned Milwaukee is they are on a move to also become big in the hand tool world and they have the money and capabilities to do that well if they choose to.  I'll be watching pretty closely. 

 

They do make some very nice power tools! 

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They are different classes for different brands - don't get me wrong but quality in China can range a wide spectrum, it depends on how things are specified in their contract. Bosch, Milwaukee and Makita for instance have mostly specified higher-end quality parts/tools. That doesn't mean they are as good, better or worse than US made, it just varies widely. Some of the Dewalt stuff is great, others a joke but that can happen now with any brand. I look for these little niche companies building tools for good reason - starting out they have to build a reputation or suffer getting shoved out of the market . The result at times is superior quality tools that really perform at a decent price, as all things used to be years ago. It's at the point where you're better off waiting awhile for others to test and review tools, especially expensive power equipment and cordless tools - customers will post complaints somewhere and a bit of research goes a long way.

 

Want to see some insane quality with a price tag to match ?

http://www.bridgecitytools.com/

I own ONE of their engineering scale bench rules, that thing was almost $30 shipped but highly accurate and a lot easier to read with the no-glare finish. They have amazing stuff - but out of my league.

 

Sarge

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Sarge, I could spend some time on that Bridge City Tools site!  Wow!  Got to wait until I get to me big screen.  My phone is not doing it justice.  

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Take a look at the Commemorative tool line or Limited edition stuff to put in a glass case unless you're a rich nut, beautiful to look at and I'd be afraid to leave a fingerprint on them.

http://www.bridgecitytools.com/default/tools/commemorative-tools.html

http://www.bridgecitytools.com/default/other-products/discontinued/limited-edition-tools.html?limit=all

 

A guy could destroy his Lotto winnings in a hurry on that site. For just plain stupid prices - go hunt some of the Japanese fine wood craft hand tools for traditional level work - 10X worse than this company but some amazing quality. Sky isn't the limit - it's more like deep space-level, lol.

 

As a welding nut - one tool that caught my eye years ago was an obscure little outfit building their own cure-all tri-square since off the shelf types are basically worthless for accuracy and have a narrow base. One of the most used tools in my arsenal and by far a top 5 favorite - expensive due to their shipping policy but man are these things worth every penny - I need another one and will spring for the higher accuracy version next time.

I currently have the original 12" blade that came with it as well as a high precision 18" for longer work - one of those tools that someone should have figured out a long time ago.

http://lasquaretools.com/

 

Just a hint and it's not yet public - there is a new style wide base t-bevel coming soon, I had approached them with the idea and they were already on it . Working with rounded edge structural steel shapes is a real pain with traditional carpentry tools - they are not designed to fit against these materials so accuracy suffers. His tri-square works so well it's disgusting - I threw all the other ones I had in the garbage as most of them wouldn't even make a true 90* angle. When doing various layout work for fabricating it's so critical to get marks that are accurate but current common tools are not designed for welding - this guy is solving that slowly but surely. I wish they would hurry up with the T-bevel, I needed one again last week and fought cutting steel to the right angle for a proper fit for a job here. There are new marking tools out there for pipe fitting, but they have some high pricing to go with them...ouch.

 

Sarge

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Btw....

 

The one, most aggravating tool I use regularly is a tape measure - they have become basically worthless no matter who makes them now days. You'll see on the LaSquare web page the US Tape brand shown - don't waste your time, junk at best. I even went directly to them and got 2 of the US only made versions, absolute crap, both of them. One is somewhere in the cemetery across the street... I just don't get it , why can't anyone produce a simple tape that has at least has some reasonable consistency and accuracy and just plain works ?? The last true decent one I had just plain wore out after 20yrs of use - a simple and reliable, dead-accurate Lufkin . That brand was the only thing allowed when I worked in the cabinet shop - we had to deal with a decimal design system down to the thousandth of an inch, or things just didn't fit . We of course used the tried and true method of fill panels that could be coped into an opening to set things accordingly on untrue structures, everyone does that. But, as to the fitment of production parts in the shop we all had to be on the same page and used these same tapes between everyone that ever worked there - the owners provided them and kept several in stock. These were the last true good quality self locking ones available and the replacements now are junk, like everything else.

 

Since that old Lufkin wore out I've tried just about every tape known to Man - either bounced them off a solid object, set them on fire, ran them over with the truck/tractor or in one case - fed one through a concrete processing machine at work. All have the same problems - they don't return properly/consistently , inaccuracy at the hook end, rules that are overly curled from everyone's dumb fascination of "stick out" length they are useless, broken ends, rivets that change length at random and of course my favorite - plastic cases made from materials that won't survive removing the tool from that ignorant blister packaging - those people should be shot, quartered and set on fire...

 

One of these days, I'm going to end up being the guy in a clock tower with a rifle from dealing with these things or just have to move to another planet, I swear to avoid dealing with them. I'd like to meet the engineers in person and collectively do serious bodily harm to these people - I mean, is it really that hard to build a real tape measure ??

 

Anyone have any ideas ? Even looking at Starrett, but from reviews it doesn't look promising at all. Well past the point of being just angry and I don't really want to go there...

 

Sarge

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I don't know if you have checked garrettwade.com . They have carry hand tools and I have purchased a few items . They are pricey but worth the money. My next planned purchase is a pair of pliers that used in aviation to secure nuts and bolts by twisted wire. Had a pair when I worked on Huey's while in the  Reserves . Son __ a _____  did a 5 finger discount on them. 

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Now you are getting into more familiar territory for me!

@Sarge I share your frustration about tape measures. Totally worthless nowadays . I just use them for field dimensions. For shop use and fabricating this is the standard here.

P1000367.JPG.3d2caa557cdfa7fc0fed8dd3d30ccb5d.JPG

 

@elcamino/wheelhorse  Garrett Wade used to be the premier tool store back 20 years ago. They still have nice stuff but nothing like what they used to be. I used to make hand planes for them then.

P1000368.JPG.cace5a6800d18fab2aad29bb503070a7.JPG

 

Some of my favorites. All one of a kind.

P1000365.JPG.83c18b7904dfe26c346f563b1546f2c3.JPG

P1000366.JPG.c5d7354ca6586f300c952941385b1f21.JPG

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@formariz  Holy cow. The planes are beautiful . Works of art. Stick rulers are the way to go. Always use the same one for a project or you may have a problem.  This weekend I am helping my son build a cabinet for a dart board. In other words I will have an impatient helper asking are we done yet. I emailed him and asked are all dart boards the same diameter . It went down hill from there.

I wish you lived closer I would love to visit your shop.

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On Wed Feb 21 2018 at 8:08 PM, C-85 said:

This is a great topic and I have a share of many tools, but mainly S-K.  We even sold them at my family's business when I was younger.  In my area they were kind of the gold standard!

 

I love my image.png.6dd58a78f19d102eddf5cf5f2556b23b.png

 

But sadly, I believe the last business that carried these near me just went out of business, so I'm not sure how I'll get new ones or replacements :confusion-confused:

I will miss the service and people of these business's very much!

 

C-85

Unfortunately, SK has gone out of business... 

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Just a heads up - the prices advertised on Garrett's site are well north of retail,  at least for the Knipex stuff. I have that exact pair of safety wire pliers for use at work tying rebar, haven't worn them out yet. I love those custom planes, built a couple years ago out of walnut and ended up selling them to a buddy. Probably won't update for awhile,  laptop let the magic smoke out and this tablet is possessed,  be a week or more before the new one gets here.

 

Sarge

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I hadn't heard of S-K Tools going out of business, so that make me quite sad!:(

 

I wonder what became of them or who might buy them out or be able to give warranty?

 

C-85

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customerservice@skhandtool.com

https://sktools.com/content/sktools/en_US/support.html#

 

Back in operation in Sycamore, Illinois. Some of the assets were bought out by Ideal Company,  which is a good thing.

 

I truly hate tape measures,  got another one today that left a 3/16" mistake on a piece of iron for the sleeve hitch adapter for the D's 3pt A frame. That piece is scrap now, think this one will get introduced to the Harris torch...

 

Sarge

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It's just so irritating when trying to fabricate parts,  can't trust a tape enough anymore and rulers often are too bulky to get in places. I might just try a Starrett for the heck of it. Maybe I should start trolling eBay for some "vintage" Lufkin tapes? That last one was still accurate but couldn't read the first 16" anymore from age and wear.

 

Pretty lame when I spend free time thinking of better and more creative way as to kill these things...

 

Sarge

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On 2/20/2018 at 9:41 PM, Sarge said:

 

One of the best places to get high precision with incredibly tough steel is Japan - their idea of a screwdriver makes the rest of the world look pathetic - Vessel is one of their top companies. Philips screws , as some may know , are designed to "cam out" at a certain torque limit. Japanese Industrial Standard cross head drivers are intended to easily exceed the torque limit of the fastener - and never slip. The angles of the tips are slightly different - use a Philips driver on anything made in Japan , such as a motorcycle or Japanese car and you'll absolutely ruin their cross-head screws. Use the right driver for the job - it really applies here.

Nice part - use that JIS cross head driver on a Philips screw, it grabs so hard they can snap the head off before slipping.

US market distributor is JDV products on the east coast - Larry is the best contact in sales and can help answer any questions. I have set up a discount code for IH8MUD members - maybe I can get him to set up a Red Square discount as well - he's done us a great service.

https://www.vesseltools.com/

Take a gander at their Impacta line - it has a built in breaker mechanism in it for use with a hammer and they truly work quite well. Even the rusted, nasty screws on my old Land Cruiser snap right loose with their tools. Vessel supplied Toyota as well as KTC , Kioto and a few other companies in the included tool kits in their top line trucks and cars. The tool kits in some of the older Land Cruisers were amazing - a nice canvas roll that even included a mini grease gun . These trucks were designed to live in the worst corners of the planet and survive, nothing else like them.

Just a few of the Vessel drivers I have, didn't have an Impacta silver one handy as they live in the Cruiser at all times, lol...

5a8cd26e28c24_20180220_1854221.jpg.14bc8439733514256e90eb5fbddf0379.jpg

I ordered some vessel screwdrivers from amazon around January 26 and I just got them. They look like they are very well made and I am very pleased with them :banana-wrench: :woohoo::thanks: @Sarge

20180305_153233.jpg

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I may have to try out a vessel phillips. Been working on a lot of ovens lately that haven't come apart in years. 

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41 minutes ago, squonk said:

I may have to try out a vessel phillips. Been working on a lot of ovens lately that haven't come apart in years. 

Don't turn the oven on with you head inside.

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You'll love the Impcta version, very solid tool.

@squonk

Do you use a cordless tool for work? The industrial tool bits they carry are excellent..

 

Sarge

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Vessel Impacta driver came today. Almost couldn't read the tag that came with it! :) I am going to save this until I get a really stuck stove screw and put it through it's paces. :occasion-xmas:

 

5aa4261c2f82c_vessel001.JPG.56a97b1771d5c80fd2577a8394b9a917.JPG

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They are very useful, many times I prefer those over the others just for it's heft and balance. The 980 red ones are really heavy, even compared to the silver Impacta series.

 

If the new laptop ever shows up, plan to see if I can get a better source for the wood handled KTC drivers, those are my favorite by far. Those are so well made and in some cases cheaper than the Vessel brand.

 

Sarge

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Btw,  does anyone here own/use one of the modern Starrett tape measures? Tempted to try one, although lately I've had issues with the automatic center punch I got from them. I love Starrett and don't get me wrong,  but it seems anything beyond their measuring tools they aren't what a person would expect.

 

My old General Tool automatic center punch lasted almost 25yrs until it finally wore out it's internal parts. Tried a new one, broke the inside plunger the 3rd time in use. Got a Starrett, it was good at first and now it's getting to where the internal parts seem to be out of alignment and won't let the spring plunger reset. It's going back next week, they already had to send extra points for it due to breakage on regular mild steel. I will say this  - their customer service is excellent. When the tip broke they had me mail it to them for testing. I even got an email from the engineer after Rockwell hardness testing and they sent several new points for it free of charge. I'd just like the thing to work as consistently as the old General Tool.

 

I'm curious to see if their tape measures are any good or just scrap like the rest of them.

 

Sarge

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Posted (edited)

My first hand tools were S-K, and I also like Easco, but they both are rare down here today.  They are probably my favorite brands, but if it is in the toolbox and it works when grabbed, it is my favorite at that moment!

 

I also have some Craftsman, Powercraft (Wards) Penncraft (J.C. Penny's), Truecraft (Don't have a clue), Mac, Matco, Snap-on, Bonney, Wizzard (Western Auto), Williams, Husky (before they became a staple of Home they were better tools in my opinion), Ace (Ace Hardware), even have a couple of tools stamped Wheel Horse, Proto, Stanley, Rigid, Blackhawk, Armstrong, GearWrench, Crescent and I am sure I have others, forgotten long buried in the bottom of a tool box somewhere.  Some I inherited don't even have a name and were supplied with equipment purchased.  And there are a few cheap tools, purchased when something was needed at that moment.  If the "cheapie's" didn't break, they ended up in the tool box too!

 

Then there are the powertools, many with the same names, and some bearing other names like Porter Cable & Bosch and still many others, but the original topic said hand tools, so I am going to stop there.

Edited by Dakota8338
smooth out a paragraph

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My oldest set of combination wrenches are S-K, and are still in pretty good shape with some minor wear at the open ends - after over 40yrs of service. I got those when I was 10yrs old for my birthday, from my grandmother who worked at the old local hardware store, she sure had good taste and knew what tools would last. 

 

Not sure if I'd want to dive into a power tool thread, that could get rather long and drawn out. One thing I do need around here and have yet to find is a decent belt sander - been hunting for one of the older long, rectangular Ryobi models for a while now, they just don't come up for sale very often. The one thing about the BE21 model is it's designed to be used upside down and has a flat top surface, much like the higher end Bosch Pro models, but a lot cheaper. We used one for field scribing work at the cabinet shop years ago, good power to weight ratio and very comfortable to work with compared to their main stable of Porter Cable sanders. On horizontal work, the heavier metal housing models are nice but when doing vertical scribing work, not so much - that's why the Ryobi lived in the truck most of the time. Almost all of the parts are still available, so finding and rebuilding one is an option.

 

image.png.d851fbe8d8579a1d2f7dd6dc8ea736d1.png

 

Sarge

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I've always had an issue with any mowing deck getting the discharge chute area clogged up from the heavy grass/weeds/water/mud on this property - I normally just carry a putty knife in the tractor's toolbox. However, went looking for a good quality, heavy blade putty knife to find basically nothing worth buying - they are all made of crap metal and won't hold an edge. So, in the further hunt, ended up in O'Reilly's one day and decided to look at some of the gasket scrapers - they are generally made from tool steel and would hold up a lot better. Ran across an odd scraper/pry bar tool made by Titan - this thing is perfect for the job of cleaning a deck quickly, got 3 of them now, lol. 

Less than $10, great tool and seems to be decent enough steel.

 

5b23ce851abe0_20180610_1254481.jpg.47a0a9ac07b7d1ef38978917b45cf44a.jpg

 

The hooked end works excellent for reaching under the deck and cleaning out the gunk when it starts discharging the clippings in wads - I've already used it quite a lot.

 

Sarge

 

 

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