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Jerm’s Dad

Best way to remove steering wheel on 854

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Have had PB Blaster sitting in the cup for a week and tried a puller but no success. I don't want to damage original wheel if I can help it. 

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I have only removed 3 and the best way I have found is a hydraulic press.

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I  dont have access to a hydraulic press. I noticed what looks like a round split retaining ring. not sure if that has anything to do with the steering whell or the steering rod.

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It's held on with a roll pin, not a retaining ring. I recently had to remove one and had to let it soak for several weeks. Fortunately I wasn't in any rush but it finally broke free. :)

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The last one I removed I soaked it in pb blaster for about 3-4 weeks. Then the roll pin removed pretty easily with a roll pin punch. I then used a bearing separator/puller to get the steering wheel off. The key I have found is to put pressure on the wheel with the puller and then give it a few decent whacks with a hammer, then tighten up again. 

 

Also remember, patience lol 

 

Good Luck!

 

Mike

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If it has a roll pin holding it to the shaft, this will have to be removed first. If the pin will not drive out, only carbide tipped drill bit will drill it out. After the pin is out a hydraulic press will work the best for pushing the shaft out. A puller will work also,  just need a little patients.

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If you do not have a press you can try a method i have resorted to a couple times.  You have to remove the dash housing and steering column as a unit..  Free up the shaft collar under the dash.  Clean the steering shaft and slide the collar and dash down the shaft out of the way. Clamp it horizontally in a vice put a 2x4 under the steering wheel hub to support it and it will make driving out the roll pin easier (drill a hole in the 2X4 to accommodate the pin as it comes out).  After the roll pin is out stand the  unit vertically in a vice with the  gear end sitting against the vice.  Climb up on a step stool use an appropriate size socket (impact type is best if you have one).  Then use a BFH to drive the wheel down the shaft on to the part you have cleaned up.  Then clean up the end you just uncovered and it should slide off easily.

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:WRS:            I have found that once the shaft and tower are out as Paul suggested you clamp it in a vice upside down, take a torch and heat the shaft an inch or more from the steering wheel hub until it is red hot, the heat will migrate down into the hub without harming the steering wheel. Apply paraffin wax or candle wax to the shaft and it will migrate down into the joint. After the shaft has cooled do as Paul said and drive it down first. Don't do this until it has cooled because the heat has expanded the shaft until it cools.

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I know it is more work, but ........... it is far better to remove the tank, wheel and steering shaft as a unit before wailing on the roll pin.

The 854 uses a 2 piece gas tank - the mounting ears are in the rather thin and delicate lower cover and will break off from heavy side impact. Then the tank leaks .......

 

Bill

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Thanks everyone for the tips. The pin came out easily. The problem is removing the wheel from the shaft. I’ve had it soaking for about 2 weeks. I’ll give it another shot today and see if it’s ready to let go. This was a open shed find and rust definitely found a home on it.

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I haven't tried it specifically on an 854, but you can rent a bearing separator and beam type puller at your local auto parts store - I've had a lot of luck pulling wheels off using that method, just make certain the bearing separator is fairly tight against the steering column shaft and put it's raised side towards the steering wheel's steel center insert - otherwise you can destroy the steering wheel.

 

 

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One trick to these is to get the beam puller dead square to the steering column shaft - otherwise it can't generate enough force and will want to pull unevenly. On stuff like this it be tough to judge if it's sitting straight and centered , just take your time and it should come off. On the D and many other models , the way they formed the wheel center they can easily hold water if ever out in the rain or during washing - I usually drill a couple of small drain holes in any of the wheels that do this to avoid the problem in the future - easy enough to hide the holes and keep it stock looking. Also, not a bad idea to clean it up and use anti-seize when putting the wheel back on the shaft. I've had some that required taking them to a machine shop (the whole dash assembly along with it) and having them press it off - I own a 30 ton model here now so that's easier if needed. Ones that have splines or keys are generally the worst - be prepared for a fight.

 

Sarge

 

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steering wheel removal is not that bad, the issue is, no concentrated direct force on the split pin. get a  ( chisel holder ) for a 1/4" solid punch, along with a 3 lb. hammer. next, someone to hold opposed force against ,the wheel , this will concentrate your drift punch force directly  on the split pin. you will not be " bouncing " your force against an unsupported wheel. once wheel is off clean up pin hole with light sandpaper, and also sand the pin. use never seize lube to replace pin.  now would be a great time to replace the sloppy brass column bearing with this, https://www.amazon.com/Mounted-Bearing-UCFL204-12-Flanged-Housing/dp/B002BBQC4O/ref=sr_1_4/145-8146402-8472236?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1499107337&sr=1-4&keywords=3%2F4+2+bolt+flange+bearing . for 8 $ on amazon , I installed mine under the cross brace in back of dash, with two 3/8" bolts and elastic nuts. very solid and smooth. have a related question ? , just ask , pete

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I was unable to remove the steering wheel from the shaft on my Raider 12 after trying multiple methods. One other option you have it to remove the steering gear at the bottom and replace it. The shaft then removes out the top. Mine was missing a tooth, so I was doing that anyway. Replacement gears are available on the internet. I think I got mine from eBay.

 

You have to grind off the weld on the top of the old gear. It will slide off the shaft from the bottom. Clean/grind off the shaft to make it smooth and install the new gear. You can either drill and pin the new one or weld it. I drilled and pinned mine so it could be removed again if necessary.

Gear.jpg.db61b9c31eeb4f70aa1cc567d6b25a08.jpg

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From the :rs:manuals section...

 

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First I've seen that pdf - nice job and basically how I get 90% of them off.

 

I never have found that bottom gear - spent a lot of time searching various angles on bevel gears and such - no luck. Any reference as to how that was found ?? I'd like to have some replacements versus having to weld and re-grind the teeth - that's a pain to match them correctly and the fan gears are bad enough but easier as they more open and bigger.

 

Sarge

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You have to watch for them. There is one on eBay right now for an 854 in Kingston, Michigan, however, if the shaft diameter is the same, it should work. Someone else may know that better than me. I think it's against the rules to post eBay links, that is why I didn't.

 

The one I got was an NOS one, but unfortunately, I don't recall where I picked it up.

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New product in our shop... 

the old standby Kroil, is no competition. 

Image result for chemsearch yield 

Edited by AMC RULES
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Who handles that brand?

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