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PeacemakerJack

What is it???

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Guys—I want to have a little fun with you.  Many of you are very well versed in not only all sorts of GT’s but also all things mechanical.  I want to you to take some time and look at this one closely.  I suggest pinch zooming if using your smart phones but honestly, you probably want to look at it with your computers because you’ll be able to see the details better.  All comments welcome—good, bad, ugly, etc...

 

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I’m taggIng a few of you just to generate some action.  This section of the forum doesn’t get seen quite as much as others for obvious reasons:rolleyes: 

 

So @Shynon @CasualObserver @WHX14 @ebinmaine @shallowwatersailor @Aldon

@Achto @19richie66 @953 nut @WVHillbilly520H And anyone else interested, what do you make of this machine? It is a family members and it has a very interesting history but I can’t wait to hear your takes on it...:popcorn:

Edited by PeacemakerJack
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What is it???

Cool. 

Just shooting from the hip, I thought it was a Case/Ingersoll tractor.

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8 minutes ago, jellyghost said:

Just shooting from the hip, I thought it was a Case/Ingersoll tractor.

Case/Ingersolls were produced in Winneconne, WI for about 5 decades.  That plant was only about 10 miles from my house. Great eye—the hood only was from their plant!:handgestures-thumbupright:

 

3 minutes ago, elcamino/wheelhorse said:

—I don't know what it is but it is a beast.

—Made in the 60's.

—From the rear looks like a car rear end.

Three for three!  More info on each of these points coming after others share their thoughts...:happy-partydance:

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5 hours ago, PeacemakerJack said:

Case/Ingersolls were produced in Winneconne, WI for about 5 decades.  That plant was only about 10 miles from my house. Great eye—the hood only was from their plant!:handgestures-thumbupright:

 

Three for three!  More info on each of these points coming after others share their thoughts..

Josh I follow this catagory coz some o the others are wikked neeet.

Thanks for tagging me in... this one's really cool  !!

I was thinking the same as the others but I would have put it a little later,  70s.

RUGGED 

 Can't wait for more info! 

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Could be a prototype for a Case. But i'd say homemade with the exception of the hood and fenders and very heavy with a Lawn Ranger steering wheel.

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I'm thinking that steering box came out of a Combine for God sakes.....Massy Harris to be exact.... Who ever built it wanted it to last forever...   and then some. Motor maybe came out of a Bolens? First I thought cub cadet but no shaft drive. 

????

Chris:wacko::wacko::wacko:

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It’s cool and built like a tank. Waiting for some history. :coffee:

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I've been following your thread Richie on your rebuild, very impressive, This thing is right up your alley! I retract the thought about the steering box, looks home made as well. Same here, waiting for the details.:wacko:

 

Ok, ( my hypothesis)  your family member was an employee of the case company, (maybe a welder ) and had access to old or disposed inventory and fabricated the machine on his own. Based on your details, factory was near you and now you're in possession and you know a bunch of us will be intrigued by this thing....

Those are Case (Old style) colors also...(Before Case got tangled up with Ingersol Rand)

 

Edited by cpete1
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:text-coolphotos:            Built to last! Looks like a narrowed nine inch Ford rear end, perhaps a Crosley transmission and a chain drive down to the driveshaft. Hood I agree is from an Ingersoll/case.

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1 hour ago, Shynon said:

... i'd say homemade with the exception of the hood and fenders and very heavy with a Lawn Ranger steering wheel...

Uncle Ken was the designer and fabricator for this “RUGGED” piece of machinery.  Hood is factory as mentioned from above. The rear fender pan was manufactured by him and contains the fuel tank just like a Case would have.  Notice the thickness of the plate welded to the front of the tank that holds the gear reduction housing (contains a #80 roller chain) from the Vintage Chevy (think 1920’s) gearbox down to the rear end.  The steering wheel is from the REO that my grandpa bought new but was completely worn out in about five years. More info to come...Keep inserting your thoughts—you guys are hitting the nail on the head for sure!

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Was Uncle Ken a Case employee? I'm lost on the mower deck.  Beyond being "Heavy Duty" I think this thing actually worked for the long haul. Gotta be from the mid to late 60's. Maybe the hood was an upgrade later on. Sometimes custom stuff doesn't shake out and work as intended, (from my own attempts) this thing looks like it worked as intended, and still will. Your Uncle Ken knew how to plant his beans!

Edited by cpete1
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Uncle Ken is the ultimate fabricator—I should probably start a thread that is based on all of the cool stuff he has built. Give him a shop of basic tools and enough time—he’ll build you almost anything.  He worked for Oshkosh Truck in assembly and multiple fabrication jobs during the 1970’s.  My uncle Bob worked for Case most of his life—hence the hood and the Case themed look. The mower deck is also completely fabricated by him. Much of this machine is not simple to make and would cost a fortune to mass produce but it has lasted a lifetime and will continue on in the future.

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Oshkosh!!!!! That explains the 1/2 " steel everywhere.  My God, this gives made to last a whole new meaning! Not only that but your Uncles got along,(not always the case) as your Uncle Bob got the paint for him, and the hood.

Thanks for posting this, very, very impressive.:handgestures-thumbupright:

Chris

 

tremendous amount of thought applied to the design, access to get on and off, Steering wheel location, pedals. implement engagement levers and such, very very  impressive....

Edited by cpete1
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Agreed! And thank you Pete for the comments and  following my adventures. I am humbled. 

Edited by 19richie66

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Very cool.... how about some pics with the hood up?  And I'm guessing with all that plate steel, just the tractor has to weigh in the 800-900 lbs range by itself! I am always humbled by the people who have the time and talent to envision a project like this and see it through to completion.  Thanks for sharing for sure... looking forward to more details and story.

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Thanks Pete! I’ll share what you said with him next time we talk. 

 

I’ll definitely get more pics.  Now that you know that it is mostly homebuilt—you can look at how he developed most of the systems.  Knowing that our beloved :wh:‘s were originally conceived and built by two men in their garage, this build I thought would be of interest to you.  Every system on it pretty much is original to this tractor.  I have to sit down with Uncle Ken to get the whole story but I believe that he started working on it in the late 1960’s.  He used parts that he could find but much of it he fabricated himself.  He was the guy that built a lathe when yet a kid using an old bicycle as the drive system. My dad would sit on the bike and pedal while uncle Ken machined wood pieces and parts!!!

 

As one of my favorite quotes states, “Necessity is the mother of invention!”

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Did he make the rear end intending to make a three point?  Did he ever make a snow plow for it?

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46 minutes ago, CasualObserver said:

800-900 lbs range by itself!

I was going to guess in the 1000 plus range Jason! Gotta like the R-4's on the rear and the deck does have an interesting looking pulley arrangement!

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It would take you 5 years just to cut threads in all the plate. :laughing-rolling:

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29 minutes ago, PeacemakerJack said:

Thanks Pete! I’ll share what you said with him next time we talk. 

 

I’ll definitely get more pics.  Now that you know that it is mostly homebuilt—you can look at how he developed most of the systems.  Knowing that our beloved :wh:‘s were originally conceived and built by two men in their garage, this build I thought would be of interest to you.  Every system on it pretty much is original to this tractor.  I have to sit down with Uncle Ken to get the whole story but I believe that he started working on it in the late 1960’s.  He used parts that he could find but much of it he fabricated himself.  He was the guy that built a lathe when yet a kid using an old bicycle as the drive system. My dad would sit on the bike and pedal while uncle Ken machined wood pieces and parts!!!

 

As one of my favorite quotes states, “Necessity is the mother of invention!”

 What an incredible piece!

There are museums that would absolutely love to display a machine like that.

Josh, please do take the time to sit with your uncle and get as many details about that as you can. For the history of it if nothing else. We'd all love to hear more about it.

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1 hour ago, 19richie66 said:

Agreed! And thank you Pete for the comments and  following my adventures. I am humbled. 

HUMBLED???? I have 2 wh that I want to restore and the biggest concern I have now is how in the heck am I going to "hold my own" when I do the restore after seeing work like yours and the other machines on this forum. Not to mention how decent everybody is about helping or suggestions. Your work is exceptional right along with Uncle Kens unit. I've made some stuff myself which I intend to post when I figure out how to post pictures. (plus I'm becoming a "supporter soon)  A person can learn an awful lot when he sees work like you guys put out. One of the things about the Wheel Horse is there isn't a lot of room for improvement, I found that out making the linkage for my snowplow. Everything is pretty well thought out and person really has to reach to make a design improvement.

Oops I forgot,  everybody is nasty here, lousy work and they're not interested in anything anybody posts, absolutely useless forum!!!! Rotten, rotten bunch of people....:ROTF:Sorry Eric, I keep slipping up...

And Peace maker Please do tell your Uncle how much we enjoyed seeing his machine, its an honor . 

Chris

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I’m just a regular guy and I like making things. If I ever finish something, then what do I do? I have a whole shed full of good intentions and ideas :laughing-rolling: But I do appreciate it. 

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2 minutes ago, 19richie66 said:

I’m just a regular guy and I like making things. If I ever finish something, then what do I do? I have a whole shed full of good intentions and ideas :laughing-rolling: But I do appreciate it. 

Doesn't matter if you finish anything as long as you have FUN.

 

20 minutes ago, cpete1 said:

Sorry Eric, I keep slipping up...

 

It's ok Chris. We all make mistakes. 

Just keep working on your negativity and lousy attitude and we can conquer your good demeanor together. 

AAHHAAHHAAHHAAHHAAAAA !!!!!!

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