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Achto

Stubborn Roll Pin Removel

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It didn't happen if ther are no pics! :ychain:

Other than th e one crack down the lenght of the spoke that wheel didn't look too bad either.

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Sorry, Didn't mean to be so rude.:D

 

IMG_20180107_123114373-min.jpg.b6e5b9db66e5385f6630b41cb64570fb.jpg

 

After the pin was drilled out I was still faced with getting the wheel off of the shaft. Luckily the dash slipped through the cross pieces on the press so I was able to press the shaft out of the wheel.

 

There are a few cracks in the steering wheel but I should be able to repair them.

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Ain't that a pain that dash hanging off ther just getting in the way? :)

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11 hours ago, WHX14 said:

Ain't that a pain that dash hanging off ther just getting in the way? :)

 

             :text-yeahthat:sure is.  That's why I have cut the shafts on several of mine.    Pretty easy  to reconnect them with a sleeve coupling and two more roll pins

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Ed Kennell said:

reconnect them with a sleeve coupling and two more roll pins

Does that result in a sloppy wheel  feel? I would guess not if the coupling is a good fit. What your source on the coupling Ed material ? Would allow for some custom height adjustments if desired & some anti seize would make for easy future disassembly. A 1055 & 400 that I stripped down had the lower gear pinned on and that one USUALLY comes out easy due to the grease in the area. Most late models are welded :( but just something to check before the french words start flying. Sometimes the locking collar under the dash can be brown welded on and give you fits. Worst part about any stuck wheel, roll pin (or engine pulley) is the inability to use the heat wrench. It would have been interesting to possibly try the battery arc method to free up that pin. I have never tried it but they claim it sometimes works.

Edited by WHX14
gramma
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I found its easier to cut the shaft and collar and replace with a new collar and a length of 3/4 stock.

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If you want to go this route with a collar and roll pins - use the heavier spiral pins, they can take a much higher load and that's why WH used them on so many of their parts. McMaster and others stock them in bulk quantities - it's handy to have a few sizes in stock for replacements for our equipment. It's not too hard to go into the steering shaft at the gear end and cut out that weld - I just use a 1/8" or 3/16" grinding wheel on the angle grinder and knock the gear off - makes it easier to remove it from the dash on the older models and put that stubborn steering wheel in a press to remove the shaft without destroying the hard to find wheels. Plus, when it's done it all looks stock again...

 

Sarge

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I have the same exact problem. You have a pic of the bit by any chance?

My steering wheel is in really nice shape and i dont want to break it trying to remove as i think i can work around it possibly.

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7 hours ago, Joshn569 said:

I have the same exact problem. You have a pic of the bit by any chance?

 

I picked up my carbide tipped bit at a local True Value hardware store.

IMG_20180107_101608646-min.jpg.b7617f14de20284b0842b96c07096a94.jpg

IMG_20180209_224146461-min.jpg.57bce6d48e9cca90bd9087a6068f61eb.jpg

 

You can also use a carbide tip masonry bit. One word or advise, don't be afraid to increase you drill speed. Fast with a lot of pressure will work the best when using a carbide tip bit on hardened steel.

If you have any more questions, I'd be happy to help.

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