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4 hours ago, Jonathan Karmelita said:

cutting off the axle protrusion which would expose the spindle rod. Smooth the two cut surfaces and pin them back together. Good to know the jackshaft is viable, so I ordered the parts.

 The cut axle shaft will need to be PERFECTLY flat if you cut the bottom or it will bind when you turn. If you cut the top off it will allow for some minor tolerances and doesn't necessarily need to be exactly perfect but still needs to be close. The shaft collar 953 mentioned is a good idea. Double up the roll pins, smaller one inside of a larger one. You can leave space for thrust washers to sit between the pieces.

 

19 minutes ago, 953 nut said:

That will be a safe very cool idea.

:lol:

 

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1 hour ago, wallfish said:

 The cut axle shaft will need to be PERFECTLY flat if you cut the bottom or it will bind when you turn. If you cut the top off it will allow for some minor tolerances and doesn't necessarily need to be exactly perfect but still needs to be close. The shaft collar 953 mentioned is a good idea. Double up the roll pins, smaller one inside of a larger one. You can leave space for thrust washers to sit between the pieces.

 

:lol:

 

I will make the cut as 953 nut demostrates. I must mention the obvious. after the spindle is removed. Thrust washers much better than wheel bearing I was thinking about. If you guys are engineers post those degrees     

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Posted (edited)

Some of my working years when Packard Electric was a division of GM, I was a glorfied inspector

5b761595-7f4c-48ff-857a-c615bd438437_Images_ReliabilityEngineeringPlant_1200x675_extra_large.jpeg

Edited by Jonathan Karmelita
duh, spelling
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Just chiming in to follow and suggest instead of cutting off where Richard suggested could you drill and tap the top errr the bottom side of the spindle and use a bolt with thrust washers to hold it all on? I can see quite a bit of stress there when coming down hard off a wheelie! :auto-dirtbike:

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7 minutes ago, WHX14 said:

Just chiming in to follow and suggest instead of cutting off where Richard suggested could you drill and tap the top errr the bottom side of the spindle and use a bolt with thrust washers to hold it all on? I can see quite a bit of stress there when coming down hard off a wheelie! :auto-dirtbike:

Yikes,  you are describing the other side of my axle w/o the washers as I bought it. I may have to buy fabricated spindles so the stress is distributed to the top and bottom. 

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First and foremost, I HAVE A HANDLE. My preserved Wheel Horse is my avatar so please don't despair that this post is about my chopping and hacking. My photo shows there was less to work with than originally thought. I could only add a flat washer and may add another roll pin inside the one in place. Already I feel a whole lot better since the spindle fell off while pushing her around the garage 

DSC02277.JPG

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7 minutes ago, giddyap said:

about my chopping and hacking.

LOl ...don't worry some of the fellas here handle should be chopping and hacking as they are quite good at it! We do enjoy our customs here. Keep those pics coming!

 

I think what 'fish meant is add one of these and drill all the way thru for a double roll pin. gives you a little more beef on the underside. Might not have the room for it tho. I would change the washer out to a bronze washer. Better to wear on that than the roll pin. Looks like you got a fairly straight cut. :handgestures-thumbupright:

Shaft-Collar-SC-F.jpg

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1 hour ago, WHX14 said:

I think what 'fish meant is add one of these and drill all the way thru for a double roll pin. gives you a little more beef on the underside. Might not have the room for it tho. I would change the washer out to a bronze washer. Better to wear on that than the roll pin. Looks like you got a fairly straight cut.

:text-yeahthat:

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You're never wasting time if you enjoy what you're doing...:handgestures-thumbupright:

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5 minutes ago, roadapples said:

You're never wasting time if you enjoy what you're doing...:handgestures-thumbupright:

YESS !!!

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24 minutes ago, roadapples said:

You're never wasting time if you enjoy what you're doing...:handgestures-thumbupright:

Please remind our wives of that!!!

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It would be nice if you could fit a thrust bearing in there but at minimum a thrust washer should go in there. It's not completely necessary but it will steer more easily

thrust.jpg.1b94fc323825b95f809ff9758659bf93.jpg

 

7 hours ago, giddyap said:

chopping and hacking

This should be my handle!

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6 hours ago, WHX14 said:

think what 'fish meant is add one of these and drill all the way thru for a double roll pin. gives you a little more beef on the underside. Might not have the room for it tho. I would change the washer out to a bronze washer. Better to wear on that than the roll pin. Looks like you got a fairly straight cut. :handgestures-thumbupright:

   

 

The second roll pin went in the first without giving me grief. A do-over may prove different so I'll let sleeping dogs lie. I'll see how the washer wears and hopefully change it in time to prevent a disaster. I may relocate the drag link arm to the top of the flipped axle. Either way, this side needs beefing up, too. The cut face has a slight dome surface to prevent hanging up.

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13 minutes ago, giddyap said:

I'll let sleeping dogs

Sometimes the best approach :)

 

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I can almost double the ground clearance doing the same and moving the arm to the top. More complex because the spindle is curved. My 2 rough cut pieces will come in handy when I goof up the original  

DSC02278.JPG

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You could make them a little bigger to help tie rod length..

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You can always cut off a bit of the axle casting's height to gain enough to make a more solid connection to the spindle to carry the load. Also, reaming and installing either bronze or brass bushings will take a lot of the drag off the steering parts. 

 

Sarge

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    Update. I have most everything roughed in. I decided the rake was too drastic to just bolt the engine on the frame.so I made a plate to level the engine. 2 bearing flanges sit nearly under the tower for the jack shaft so that took some time making it fit. Those pulleys will sit safely under the foot rest. With the jackshaft lower than a 551 Suburban engine pulley,.I'm hoping everything works as it should  Wife thinks it won't be long before I complete it and then what will I have to keep busy? Well after the bugs are all out, I will most likely paint it. 

         

DSC02323.JPG

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Hate to throw a curve ball but just noticed the steering arms in front of the wheels which means the Akerman angle of the arms may need to be swapped from facing in, to facing outwards. It all comes down to how the wheels track in a turn. When turning, the inside wheel of the turn direction must track a tighter radius than the outside wheel. The Akerman angle of the steering arms are designed to do just that. But when you swap them from the rear of the wheels to the front, the wheels may track opposite. As in, now the outer wheel will track a tighter radius than the inside wheel does. This will make the steering unstable. Check and see if you have that situation happening.

 

5a5d2a45e9545_wheeltrack.jpg.b62ce190830d7cb049a1b2f6a5f2dbb4.jpg

DSC02278.JPG.40fc3bfeee9cd1d3a7102cb754c68157.JPG.5169058c3d9e9fe612401f5beb9ab8d0.JPG

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Aha, I suspected tracking was messed up.Thanks Wallfish. I found this by Half-breeder, DIY Go Karts, July 2013 for complete article   http://www.diygokarts.com/vb/showthread.php?t=23785

"If" there is room the typical way to improve Ackerman is reverse the spindles to a rearward facing position, and the 'geometry' is corrected('if' mounting holes line up w/ Ackerman angle 'line' on the spindles)... Example of Ackerman w/ 'trailing' arms.

Another way to correct Ackerman(for forward facing spindles) is 'extending' the tierod connection point, on the spindle arm, 'past' the kingpin and 'outward', towards the wheels to lineup w/ the 'line' to create Ackerman...This procedure is not widely used/done, due to clearance issues...
(the one on the 'right')..

 

.A 3rd way, which I did, because of clearance issues w/ wheels vs spindles, was take the distance that you would use for the above(2nd) example tie-rods, but move them inward instead of out, crossing them over/past the pitman arm... by using a pitman arm 'plate' to separate the 2 arm connections from each other, and create the necessary movement needed for proper Ackerman...

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