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pfrederi

Red Wheel Horse Hydro Filters

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Started on one of my winter projects today, tearing down a Sundstrand Hydro gear.  This is the third hydro I have come across with a Red Wheel Horse filter.  Wonder how many years it has been since they made those.  Obviously maintenance was not the POs strong point...:P

 

Filter doesn't want to come off either...married to the transaxle after all these years...

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My C125 from 1981 was like that also, but mine came off easily.  The first year WH used the Eaton 1100.

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My 1974 C160 Sundstrand had a red filter when I got it last year.  I couldn't budge it with al the normative tools. Finally out came the 4 ft pipe wrench.  I grabbed right at the housing back and after a slight crush it spun off.  It was like the slight crushing broke the sticking Rubber O ring

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I too have had to resort to severe methods to remove "old" filters on the hydro's.

I have several different type of oil filter removal tools, but sometimes drastic measures are needed!

I wish I had a 4' (aluminum) pipe wrench!

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29 minutes ago, oliver2-44 said:

Finally out came the 4 ft pipe wrench.

 

Its hard to beat leverage when removing a stubborn whatever it is......

4 feet is a pretty hefty lever for that application.

 

"Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world".

                                                                                                                                      - Archimedes
 

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Paul, I will be watching this thread with great interest. I have found that a few light blows on a small chisel angled on the rim will start a filter cartridge turning.

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Victory...Tried filter pliers (no movement), strap wrench (slipped), Chain wrench (crushed the filter housing, couldn't get close to the inside edge because the parking brake shaft was too close to the filter.  Hammer and chisel won the day

IMG_0092.JPG

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1 hour ago, pfrederi said:

Hammer and chisel won the day

:woohoo:                    works every time.

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The before...

Image result for red wheel horse filter

...and then, beaten to a bloody pulp.  :lol:

IMG_0092.JPG.b1d3c639a4ad6f0576272eb808eb9f53.JPG.7794ebc7ab72ae07c6a106a5599367c0.JPG

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I have had good luck with driving a screwdriver through the fllter and then turning. GM would always put the engine filter on so tight at the engine factory, that was sometimes the only way yo get it off.

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On 12/23/2017 at 4:02 PM, oliver2-44 said:

My 1974 C160 Sundstrand had a red filter when I got it last year.  I couldn't budge it with al the normative tools. Finally out came the 4 ft pipe wrench.  I grabbed right at the housing back and after a slight crush it spun off.  It was like the slight crushing broke the sticking Rubber O ring

We have a 48" aluminum pipe wrench at work.

I have only used it a couple of times, it is a beast (could not even imagine a cast iron model).

 

36" I use all the time.

 

You must have lots of room around the filter to fit in a large pipe wrench like that.

 

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In the process of trying  to get the filter off Various ways I ended up with the rear fenders and rear wheel off with it on a jackstand

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I spy a very interesting looking chisel - what brand is that ??

 

Older Chrysler slant six engines were notorious , folks would crank their filters down and generally had to use pry bars to roll back the face plate enough to crack them loose - even a chisel wouldn't work . Book said hand tighten , and they meant it - by hand only , no tools , fool....lol .

 

Sarge

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1 hour ago, Sarge said:

I spy a very interesting looking chisel - what brand is that ??

 

Older Chrysler slant six engines were notorious , folks would crank their filters down and generally had to use pry bars to roll back the face plate enough to crack them loose - even a chisel wouldn't work . Book said hand tighten , and they meant it - by hand only , no tools , fool....lol .

 

Sarge

 

 

Proto

 

Bought them a couple years ago to replace the ones i got from my Father.  The were at east 75 years old and had spent most their life breaking cement and rocks....

IMG_0100.JPG

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On 12/24/2017 at 12:34 PM, pfrederi said:

Victory...Tried filter pliers (no movement), strap wrench (slipped), Chain wrench (crushed the filter housing, couldn't get close to the inside edge because the parking brake shaft was too close to the filter.  Hammer and chisel won the day

IMG_0092.JPG

It's bleeding! :) 

 

I used to run into stuck filters on Chevy motorhomes. They always seemed to have about 20,000 miles on them and they had the black AC-Delco filter that was installed at the factory. We would always end up puncturing the can and tearing it all off leaving the round metal filter mounting which is on the left in Paul's pic. Used an air hammer with a punch in one of the holes and applied pressure in a counter clockwise direction. 95% of the time it would come off. The other 5% the oil filter threaded block adapter would shatter. Luckily this was a cheap cast iron piece held on with 2 bolts. You couldn't get to the bolts with the filter base on but once it broke off it was a matter of putting it in a vise and getting the bolt. Used to keep a few adapters in stock just for this occasion.

 

Edited by squonk
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I figured it had to be a high quality brand - those rock chisels are made from some interesting steel for sure , wish they still made them from whatever that alloy was...Proto makes some very good tools even today .

 

Sarge

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