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Oldman

18 Auto Setting "true neutral".

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Hello,

      I am going to set the neutral pedal in sync with the hydro adjustment triangle on the side of my pump. Same principal as the manual having the tractor rear on jacks, loosening the set bolt 3/8th and moving the triangle back and forth via the slot on the triangle, only this time wrapping a bungee-cord around the clutch/neutral pedal securing it tightly in the down position. Start and run the engine as normal, set throttle at 3/4  minimum, begin moving the triangle forward and backward until the wheels cease turning.  (Hopefully) Once achieved, set the 3/8th bolt ,turn off the engine and return tractor to the ground. Now it's time for a test run. I believe some fine tuning may be needed on the linkage too, compensating for wear and tear.This is a topic that many people have inquired about and after several collaboration with forum members, perhaps I will achieve "true" neutral having the pedal, triangle and linkage all in sync! I can't take credit for this process, many thanks to Sarge for the technical aspects of this procedure! Well, I followed the procedure and still found my tractor wanting to travel a bit reverse when suspended on stands until I barely touched the motion lever. The adjustment on the triangle could not rectify this. I believe the worn parts need replaced. There is the pedal assembly itself that may be "tweaked" underneath the machine, but very unorthodox! The rod, part number 6-17, I might be able to tweak this a bit, shrinking it slightly, that would correct the over travel, in theory.......I also noticed part number 6-28 the pedal itself, has had a repair on my machine. might consider replacing it.

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Edited by Oldman
added parts diagram

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I have 3 "Big D's" - and on 2 of them, the 180 & 200, I can about 'throw' the lever at neutral position and it will BE in neutral. But my D160 is a different bird, I have to fiddle with the lever to find it and even then sometimes I'll get off the tractor and look around and it'll be creeping backward/forward:ranting: (maybe thats why they added the seat safety switch!:angry-nono:) But, I dearly do dislike those!

 

I have made several runs at adjusting it with no luck, even disassembling it to check for internal wear somewhere inside, but again with no luck. So, I am just living with it, actually I have become pretty good at finding that 'sweet spot' and it not too big a deal.

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Ya, I'll be running it parked and tuning the engine and it wants to escape the garage!:auto-layrubber:getting good at grabbing the motion lever just in the nick of time!:handgestures-thumbupright:

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I had the same issue - no adjustment would stop the creep in reverse , even when I adjusted it to run forward slightly with the neutral setting . Last time I worked on fixing that front seal leak I changed both trunion bearings and seals - it hasn't had that creep issue since . LJ , at LJ Fuild Power explained that those bearings get hammered and worn by the piston block and it's pulsations when running - this will cause the bearings to go bad over time as well as leaks . He was right , both shafts had a witness mark of sorts - no wear on the shafts with a mic but that does indicate bearing wear . He did say any slop in those bearings will make it move the pump arm on it's own as well from vibration - which is what mine was doing besides the oil leaks . Now , I can stomp the pedal down from either direction and trust it enough to get off the seat although I will put it in park just to be safe . As soon as I mentioned it had a delay between putting it to neutral and the thing wanting to creep on it's own he brought up that bearing issue - seemed to ring a bell with him .

 

#1 step is to tie that clutch/brake pedal down tight - as if you were stomping on it with your foot . Using your leg to push it to neutral is more force than you'd think so tie it down tight when setting the cam on the pump arm . Step #2 is to set the handle to the neutral spot , then #3 is to set the distance on the parking brake . All of this is basically the same on all the D's with some differences in how later models used a different linkage setup . The arm on that pump travels a very short distance so everything at that end is quite sensitive , very minor changes make a big difference . I'd bet if you replaced the offset ground eccentric on the arm and the triangle section with new parts (probably have to be fabricated) it would solve a lot of issues . I had to make a new sleeve for mine - it was stuck and nearly worn through from wear against the triangle part . Early models I know for sure also had a serious weak point and a lot of wear at the handle due to how it's cut for the cross pin that allows it to swing in two directions 90* from each other to match that guide pattern on the dash assembly . I've been trying to figure out how to make that work in a different manner other than the original oval hole that was used originally , that's been driving me nuts because there is little room for mods in there . I do need to make a new handle - mine is close to the point of breaking in half due to the wear .

 

Since I freed up that eccentric on the pump arm as well as the handle parts it does work better , although now it seems slower in reverse than it was before . I need to address that so when I'm plowing snow on long runs I can spend a lot less time freezing my hide off .

 

Sarge

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Excellent! I have the original pump and a replacement shaft, once the time and weather permits, LJ Power will be called for whatever I find needs replaced and whatever they have in stock? The spare hydro motor will be rebuilt as well. Going to pick up a replacement pedal and a spare set of mufflers while they are available. Yes, reverse is slow. I can tap the pedal while going backwards and it'll do fine, but I keep my right hand in the ready position on the motion lever! I had to re-adjust the carb yesterday probably due to temperature? She's a temperamental o'l girl but the relationship is worth it! Ha ha ha!

Edited by Oldman

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A slight adjustment to the carb in really cold weather isn't uncommon - just depends on the engine and how well it's jetted . Any slight build up of crud will make the passages smaller , that's fine when the fuel is hot but it will lean out more in cold weather too . If you are starting it when it's really cold you might want to change the engine over to 10W30 oil - straight 30W doesn't pump too well below 30*F . A pressure test per the book if you don't have a gauge installed isn't a bad idea either and there is a pressure adjustment on the outside of the engine . I was reading through the big twin manual last night to answer a few questions on how these blocks are set up - no wonder these things lasted so long by the way they are built .

 

If you would - look at the top of the block , just behind the governor by the valve cover - there should be a set of casting numbers . See if your 18hp says K482....or K532 . Mine is a '74 and has been butchered by previous owners (imagine that) and the tins look like they have been painted several times - it is marked K532 - curious if they swapped motors .

 

Sarge

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Hello,

    I didn't recall the number and I just repainted everything, dah-hah! It read 532 as well. 20hp? I run 10W-30.I usually remove the low idle screw and spray through with cleaner, then take my finger and cover the opening while it's running, block and unblock the passage and it opens up nicely, then install it set 1-1/4 turn. I think the little springs on those screws wear out and vibrate open? Oh, this whole machine was butchered, everywhere! The PTO clutch didn't even have the bearing sleeve on the back of the clutch plate, just rolled all over the place making sparks! Amazing how people just wing it. How hard is it to ask a few questions? Yes, built extremely well, times have changed.

Finding that clutch plate took two years! I had it engineered to work with another set up on the backside of the plate until the correct part was found. How do you crimp those little brass rivets on the clutch pads? Do you have a small rivet press or something?

 

Oldman

Edited by Oldman

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I resorted to a center punch with a "hollow" grind and while some didn't look so pretty, none  of the discs came off. If I need to do it again, I think it will be with a good epoxy.

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Should be able to set those brass rivets with the same size pin punch as the size of their shanks - it will swell the rivet and set it tightly into the material .

 

I highly suspect the twin opposed (flat twin) engines in the 18-23hp range are given the same basic casting number - K532 . You'd have to pull a cylinder head and measure the bore as that would be the only basic difference in which engine size it actually is - the bore sizes are quite different .

 

Same deal and common knowledge with the single cylinder K series iron blocks - K241 (10hp) and K301 (12hp) are marked with a simple 301 on the block - the bore is the difference between the two ratings . I had asked a local Kohler engine rebuilder - he's been in the biz for 40yrs and was not sure on the big twins - he said he's only ever had to rebuild a few of them since they are quite well built in comparison to the oil slinger single cylinder models . Being pressure fed makes all the difference - the rods will never get starved unless something goes horribly wrong , not the case with the single cylinder engines as they are only rated at a maximum of 25* . They weren't kidding about that either , much over that angle and you're starving the dipper away from the oil and damaging the rod very quickly .

 

And yes , those needle adjustment screw springs will wear out with age and become soft from heat/cooling cycles - it's common and new ones are available . At least most times they screw themselves out and just richen the mixture - which is a lot better than the other way ...

Might want to check for excessive play in the throttle plate shaft - it can be bushed to stop the wear and any leakage/movement can cause idle issues in a hurry .

 

Sarge

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