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Going to make for one very nice 5a149c070ab79_hdr-logo-100b(1).png.5eb146d4526f56ae28d8bee75ff7de7f.png stable.   :handgestures-thumbsup:

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:text-coolphotos:      You may as well begin by building shelves to store future projects on, double-decker :wh:.       :ychain:

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Lookin' good. I've been mulling over what to do here. I may be doing exactly the same... or putting a foundation under the existing workshop to create 2 levels... Alot of work to do so but might be worth it....

I'll be following with interest to see how yours goes.

 

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got one coat of paint on the floor today...going to put another on Thursday...didnt get a picture of the whole thing painted...too windy to open the overhead door. Will get more pics when I can

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I can't see an seams....is the floor plywood?    What paint are you using?

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27 minutes ago, Ed Kennell said:

What paint are you using?

 

Yeah......I want to know too........along with what is the flooring material, and its thickness.

???

At least 3/4", I would hope......

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11 hours ago, Ed Kennell said:

I can't see an seams....is the floor plywood?    What paint are you using?

 

10 hours ago, ztnoo said:

 

Yeah......I want to know too........along with what is the flooring material, and its thickness.

???

At least 3/4", I would hope......

the floor actually had two layers...there is one layer of OSB directly on top of the floor joists, then a layer of material similar to MDF for the top layer. Floor joists are 2x6 on 12" centers so definitely heavy duty enough.

 

As far as paint goes...its just a cheap flat white latex our local lumber yard sells. Not the most durable thing in the world, but for the cost  ($30 for 5 gallons) I can make it work

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Got a second coat of paint on the floor this morning...and got a new phone that takes better quality pictures...so got a couple better ones of the whole shop. Think I'm gonna put one more coat on the floor this afternoon and call it good

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Those trusses are set unlike any I've ever seen or building I have be involved constructing. The flat bottom chord (ceiling joist) would normally be set on the top of the double plate, but in this case there is no double plate, only a single top plate.

I've never seen anything constructed where the truss tail was sitting on and attached to the wall plate.  umm.gif.a2767583ec6499e52e1d288a39a18a9c.gif

It gives a little more head room, but that's a detail I wouldn't care to replicate.

Also, I note every other truss has no direct bearing stud under it. If the wall had a double plate, that wouldn't be an issue.

I guess those hurricane ties are the main mechanical attachment. Wonder if they are attached on alternate trusses on the outside of the frame like they are on the inside of the wall frame?

That's very odd to me, and I was around residential and light commercial construction for about 45 years.........

 

I'm not intentionally meaning to be critical, just noticing some details which I would not copy if I were building the structure.

If it suits your needs and gives you good service life, I guess that's the most important thing for you.

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:rolleyes: Well, it's not like it's going to be carrying any significant snow load in Oklahoma. 

That's for sure.  :confusion-shrug:

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1 hour ago, ztnoo said:

residential and light commercial construction

That is a factory built shed and they support political campaigns so they don't have to follow building codes.        :ychain:

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A better picture of how they are fastened...I thought it was weird too...but have never saw a building like this that was built with a double top plate...a friend of mine who built houses for over 50 years looked it over and he thought it was weird but didn't see any problems with the way it was built

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33 minutes ago, AMC RULES said:

Well, it's not like it's going to be carrying any significant snow load in Oklahoma.

 

Likely not.

Just tornados, which they have bunches of in "Tornado Alley".

5 minutes ago, Professor1990 said:

A better picture of how they are fastened...I thought it was weird too...but have never saw a building like this that was built with a double top plate...a friend of mine who built houses for over 50 years looked it over and he thought it was weird but didn't see any problems with the way it was built

 

Well at least you are aware of the odd details then.

I wonder it those long screws are the only mechanical fastener on the truss tails with no stud bearing under them?

Can you reach over the top plate and feel a hurricane tie going to the frame exterior???

Edited by ztnoo

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Just finished up the third and final coat of paint...checked while I was out there the only method of fastening every other truss is with the single big screw. And snow shouldn't be a problem here, although we have been known to have a freak storm dump 48" on us at once. We do have tornadoes here, but straight line winds would be my biggest concern...it's nothing to have sustained winds of 50-60 mph here...had one of those days last weekend and it held together just fine. Now my RV was another story, woke up at 4 am thinking I was gonna blow over the wind was so strong 

 

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Looks good Bryce.  I really like that roll up door.  It won't block the lighting like my big 10X18 foot overhead.   Is that a manual or electric operator?

I'm sure it will serve you well.   While we are discussing the framing,  I don't see the need for the double wall studs at the siding joints and I would probably have put the roof trusses on 16" centers to align with the wall studs and put in a plywood hurricane tie connecting each wall stud to each roof joist.  This also eliminates any question on the need for a double top plate on the walls.  

    And that's my two scents or cents, or sense....   :huhs:

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Thanks Ed...the door is just your standard manual roll up door. If I had built the building myself I would have done just like you suggested...I've looked at several of these buildings before purchasing this one, and every one of them had the double studs at the joints not sure what their reasoning behind it is

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25 minutes ago, Digger 66 said:

Is it gonna be safe in Tornado Alley 

 

A reasonable question. Seriously..........

I'm not sure anything above ground level is a safe bet in Tornado Alley, accept a concrete encased bank vault.

 

Those frequent, constant, straight line winds do concern me, however.

I'm wonder what the orientation to the prevailing winds is.......particularly tornado season orientation.  ????

My first instinct would be to put the back end (12' wide) in line with that prevailing direction.

Just one man's opinion........

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Our main winds come out of the south to southwest in summer and north to northwest in the winter. The building is running lengthwise north to south with the door facing the north, and a grove of locusts trees immediately to the west to break some of the wind. The house we used to live in had a building of similar size and construction running east to west with no windbreak anywhere near, and it fared just fine, aside from losing a few shingles once. So I don't foresee a problem there. And as far as tornadoes, any structure whether portable or built on a foundation is going to incur serious damage during a tornado

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Started on some of the electrical today. Got panel in place and all boxes on the walls set...Started running wire but messed up my drill bit...nails hidden inside the studs are kinda hard on bits lol...oh well tomorrow is another day

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10 hours ago, Professor1990 said:

 

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You can never have enough outlets ^^^^

Very wise decision to install plenty of them .

When I was helping my dad build his 24 X 24 garage as a teenager , I wondered why he had +/- 25 outlets installed .

I soon found out ......

 

I don't see one high enough to plug a :wh: clock into though ????

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Digger 66
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I love the fact that you put up the sign before most other work. Priorities !!!!

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