Straight From the Horse's Mouth - The final chapter

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Mastiffman

1.125" Axle? Potential break?

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Has anyone ever broken one of these 1.125" axles with a single set of 8.5" x 12" rims and tires on them?

I've heard of the dual tire setups doing so. But with a single set of rims? What are chances?

 

 Thanks. 

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A stock Suzuki Samurai '85-'95 used 1-1/8" axle shafts and weighs roughly 2,000lbs . I ran 33x12.5-15 Swampers on mine weighing just over 3,100lbs built and other brands of tires for years on them and only broke a few if that is any example . The WH axles are some pretty good steel - as I found out repairing key ways and having to re-cut them after they wallowed out and had to weld them up - none have ever broken despite being welded yet. Most times at worst you'll either break a hub or break the tractor frame first . I'd suspect if anyone running duals broke an axle it was from a bad outer bearing or just far too much leverage and abuse . Some that run FEL weight boxes on the rear have loaded them down to scary levels and generally only tear up the wheel bearings - inner one almost always first .

Thankfully , Lowell has us covered on that bearing....

 

Sarge

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I have had the keyways crack out because I didn't keep the set screw tight.  If you have only one setscrew, my suggestion would be to add another one at 90 degrees from the first and put a flat where the screw contacts the axle.  Then make tightening the screws a part on your maintenance schedule, like at oil change time.

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                                                                           :text-yeahthat:     Two TIGHT set screws at 90 degrees will prevent nearly all axle/hub/key failures.

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Amen to that Ed , first mod any new tractor I pick up - hate wrecking axles/hubs .

 

Sarge

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Heck, while Ive got it down I go ahead and do 3!! its a cheap and easy fix.

 

This was after I had one of the C's (I forget which one) still getting loose after adding the 2nd set, so I went back and added the 3rd one - never had any more trouble.

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Once a hub has been loose the sharp-edged cup on the set screw gets worn flat so can no long do it's job of staying tight. Best to keep spares and replace as needed.

 

Garry

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Great tips fellas! As always. I recently got a hub that only had one set screw. So that will be on my list. Any recommendation on places to get the set screws? Mcmaster-Carr? ;)

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Try to get US made screws - some of the imports have very soft tips and won't hold very tightly . Same with the woodruff keys...

I've been using grade 8 bolts myself on those hubs so I can torque them down good and hard .

Sarge

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If you add a second set screw ( i uses alloy ones from McMaster) be careful when you tighten down the jam nut.  Wheel Horse machines a flat surface around the set screw hole.  When you drill and tap you  one you will have a curved surface surrounding the new hole that is also not quite level. If you over torque the jam nut you it it may snap off the set screw as it, the jam nut and the hub are not all in perfect alignment.  Do not ask me how i know this.  but some day when some one gets one of my electro 12s they will wonder why there is a hardened set screw snapped off flush with the hub. 

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Yes - that is a problem with drilling a new hole for a set screw . When I do mine I've used a large high speed steel counterbore bit with a pilot for drilling holes for socket head cap screws . I use a letter I ( .272" ) drill bit for the tap size 5/16"-24tpi and a special counterbore bit that I had a machine shop cut the pilot end down with a grinding fixture . This gives me a control point - I use the smaller ground pilot to fit the tap hole size and the outside counterbore flutes cut the surface of the hole flat to a diameter nearly 3/4" - perfect for a grade 8 hardened bolt and locking nut . I don't have a milling machine - it would be easier just to have someone drill the hole and use an end mill to cut the top to a slight recess that is flat . Since I only have a drill press and lathe , I did it this way .

 

Here is the counterbore that's been modified -

https://www.mcmaster.com/#2919a41/=1aamckm

 

I know it's not for everyone and this was a spare bit I picked up off Ebay cheap . The shop charged me $20 and a beer to grind the point to the .272" I needed - works excellent . You could weld a hex nut to the hub with high nickle rod or tig weld it on there but it must be very straight to be effective . I have done a few by just drilling and tapping the hole and like Paul said - be careful drilling it , must be a dead 90* or the bolt can break easily when locked down with the locking nut if it hits the surface at an angle . I think the last one I did for another brand for a guy I just used an angle grinder to create a small flat area for the nut to seat flat against the hub - this makes it more effective at staying locked tightly .


Sarge

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I think this thread needs a pic! :)

20170211_160831.jpg

I eventually used stainless one from McMaster since this was supposed to be a stainless themed trailer queen. Couldn't help myself and got it real dirty plowing with no hub issues.  

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:text-yeahthat: our man Jim couldn’t help himself! :auto-layrubber: his tractor did an awesome job as the videos testify...The harder you plan to work the tractor, the more critical this hub to axle connection becomes.

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