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PeacemakerJack

Casey—our Case 224

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Awesome tractor!! Cool to own a tractor that was born less than 10 miles from where you live. Only thing I've always wondered is why they choose to have a left side discharge on the mower deck.

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21 minutes ago, Achto said:

Awesome tractor!! Cool to own a tractor that was born less than 10 miles from where you live. Only thing I've always wondered is why they choose to have a left side discharge on the mower deck.

Agreed Dan & good catch on LR deck ...I had to do a double take on that. At the Portage show there is always a good showing of Case's and I always enjoy them ....... :thanks: for sharing Jack. Case would have to be my 2nd choice over :wh: with CC and Masseys being close on other brands.

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1 hour ago, Achto said:

Awesome tractor!! Cool to own a tractor that was born less than 10 miles from where you live. Only thing I've always wondered is why they choose to have a left side discharge on the mower deck.

 

Only one logical reason to me.  Mr. Case musn't been a fan of NASCAR.

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The only thing I’ve been able to figure out with that is the orientation of the engine. Mine has the flywheel to the front with the PTO attached to that side of the motor. It has the hydraulic pump mounted to the crank output shaft side. So given that the engine is turned 180 degrees from a Cub or a Deere, I would assume this is why it runs the opposite way. The down side for summer use is that it blows that hot engine air towards you.  When cutting lawn on a hot day, I will typically tuck my right leg behind the tower. Between the engine heat and the exhaust on the right side, one’s leg can turn into a drumstick!  

 

The interesting thing is that Year’s later in production, they turned the engine the other way and had to build a mirror image deck because now the whole rotational operation was opposite!  So the later Ingersolls have a RH discharge deck!

 

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like this one...

 

They built the Colt/Case tractors in Winneconne, WI for over 30 years. I wish I would’ve been a hobbiest in the early 2000’s, I could’ve went to the plant and took some pics and videos. My loss...

 

Because these tractors are hydraulic drive, they have no mechanical link between the engine and the transaxle. Therefore, they are very smooth machines, if the engine is running good.  They also have a very low tunnel/step through design because there is no driveshaft or drive belt, just a supply and return hose. All in all, well built machines.

Edited by PeacemakerJack
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I was always a fan of the bigger Case garden tractors - but around here now one would turn loose of one used as they never seemed to wear out . Repairs could be expensive  but they would do an incredible amount of work without breaking a sweat and were seriously overbuilt in their frames and such - great design in my opinion .

 

Sarge

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my dad had CASE farm tractors growing up and in May of 1958 bought a new CASE 800 with case-a-matic drive. but when it came to garden tractors he bought a new 73 12 AUTO with a 36" rear discharge deck. I grew up driving both tractors and farmed several acres of corn as a teenager in high school with the 800 and a 630 he bought in about or around 77 and I drove home between 10 to 20 miles from Quaryville Pa to Delta Pa on RT 372. That was a long drive at 20 mph

 

 

 

 

 

eric j 

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:text-yeahthat: My grandpa bought a Case 400 with Case-o-matic brand new in 1958.  My uncle Roger was also born that year and still owns the tractor today.  It is a great mid sized tractor and the hi/low range with the “automatic” tranny mode is super convenient to use. Those are great tractors! I grew up driving a variety of Letter tractor Case tractors as well as 530, 930, 870, 2090 to name a few. In spite of the  Case farm tractors my grandpa was the only one if his brothers to buy Case GT’s. My great uncle Elmer owned Wheel Horse tractors from the early 1960’s through his passing in 2016. His last tractor, a 520 H is now owned by Russell (Rogers youngest son).

 

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Even though it has over 2000 hours on it, it looks amazing and runs excellent. Elmer always kept up with the maintenance stored it inside and waxed it yearly.

 

Eric—thanks for sharing your story of Case tractors and your family 

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Just unearthed this photo while looking for pics of vintage trucks...

 

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We built our house in 2000 as mentioned above and got Casey from uncle Eric soon after.  I used it to clear the snow in the winter then the following summer to prep the yard and seed it. If you zoom in, you’ll notice that it still has the round air cleaner of the original K321. When I replaced that motor with the M16 currently in it, I had to elongate the hood relief cut to accommodate the larger rear drop shaped air cleaner.  

 

Another comical thing to me as I look at this picture is how much beefier I was back then.  I was heavily into weight training back then and it shows.  These days I’m busy with other things and just don’t have the time that I’d like to for lifting!

 

Also—I’ve mentioned this elsewhere on the forum, but my dad is in the background of the pic spreading seed and looking for debris to clean up. He told me at that time to get rid of the willows on the fence row.  You can seem them in the picture at about 3-6’ tall. He said to replace them with pines, spruce, maple, anything but willows.  I wasn’t convinced and so I did nothing and today those are over 40’ tall and drop tons of branches every time the wind blows.  I still use that analogy when I speak to my teens about the importance of listening to your parents even when it doesn’t make sense to them...

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