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JoeliusZ28

Tire choice for snow removal on asphalt (no chains)? 414-8

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Hey everyone,

 

I've got my '89 414-8 pretty well outfitted for throwing snow other than the original turf saver tires.  I've got hitch weights and wheel weights and as long as I let the clutch out easy it seems to have fairly good traction.  however if I let the clutch out too quickly they tend to just polish the snow and spin, sometimes causing me to get stuck.  I've also got a slow leak in one of the tires so I figure it might just be a good time to upgrade anyway.  I don't want to run chains as my neighbor used them once and scratched the asphalt pretty bad.  I'd like to put something on that offers more traction as-is and hopefully has a more cool, aggressive look.  I've read a lot of good things about the carlisle all terrains here.  I think the 23x10.5-12s on the 520 wheels look awesome but I'd need to find a set of those wheels and that would be more of a look than function from what I've read.  What I'm wondering is, would the same tire in 25x9x12 fit under the fenders on the stock wheels and be within the range of deck adjustability?  It looks like it would be close.  Or should I just go with the stock 23x8?

 

I also use my tractor for cutting lawn, however snow removal is without a doubt the primary reason I own this tractor.  (If I didnt have to clear snow I'd probably own a push mower).  There is as much or more driveway to clear than grass to cut and I often clear my neighbors driveways as well.  I don't really need to worry about tearing up the lawn because I'm on flat dry ground, so AGs or ATV tires wouldn't be out of the question.  Rubber chains and filled tires are other things I am considering.  Rear tires are my primary concern for the moment but also looking at ideas for the front too.

 

Thanks!

 

Pic of tractor attached for curious minds :)

 

784B295B-61BC-48B8-98B5-C7460E24823D_zps02mb0plp.jpg

Edited by JoeliusZ28
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I was really amazed at the traction the rubber chains provided.

IMG_6856.JPG.94f7b6c2b2858d85d5fafc4c8f3c1c37.JPG

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Wow I've never seen any like that, where did you find those?  Those look much more robust than the ones I've seen.

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I have a blacktop drive as well and Iv'e had good luck with cable chains.

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Rubber chains for me too for my asphalt drive - ride a little rough, but are only for winter use....:twocents-02cents:  Forgot to mention..available at Amazon for around 100 dollars -- let the air out of you tires when you put them on and adjust them a little loose, then air up the tire to 12-14 pounds - they will conform to the tire - won't need bungee cords to keep them tight...

Edited by Jerry77
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5a01c83621933_2017-07-0210_10_26.jpg.56f0f1dbe04b720c0fa70281921c1642.jpg

 

Weight is key. I used these tires last year and they worked amazingly well, but I didn't have more than one chance to try them. They are Kenda K502's (Terra Tracs), but they only come in 10.5" width, so you will need the wheels from a 520H or an newer XI to make fit well. 

 

The weight bracket is new this year, and with the wheel weights installed (not pictured) I can have an overall vehicle weight of nearly 1500lbs. 

 

I also recommend Vredestein V61's for the front. Deep 5 rib tires but wont put ruts in the grass like the tri-ribs sometimes will (also cheaper than the tri-ribs), but still grabs the snow and steers. 

 

5a01cbf27ce1c_2017-07-0217_20_13.jpg.44a9b73fe59ad58f526c04331bcabcfc.jpg0909171338_HDR.jpg.f5bf8326050b634b349bf0fc5980a4cc.jpg

 

 

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I have Carlisle All Trail II 25x9x12 on my 312-8. I raised the seat bracket, gas tank and all up 1 3/4". I now have 2 1/16" clear between the tire and fender. I have 1/2" clear at the foot rests after bending the outside up-right forward. The inside of the up-right can't be bent forward with out trimming the belt guard and side panel.  They have had good traction on everything I have tried, but they have only been in 4" of snow. We don't get a lot of it around here.

 

SAM_0734.jpg

Edited by Lee1977
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Thanks Lee, do you have a picture of what that looks like from the side?  How difficult was that modification?  Fabricate a couple spacers?

 

Brandon, for weight I have the toro wheel weights as well as 75lbs on the draw bar.  I don't want to use any more hitch weight until upgrade to a receiver style hitch like you guys have, but the combination of the two added a lot of grip.  I'm also a fair amount of ballast myself at 225lbs :lol:

Edited by JoeliusZ28

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2 hours ago, JoeliusZ28 said:

and scratched the asphalt pretty bad

The old saying of there is concrete that isn't cracked and there is concrete that is gonna crack pretty much holds true for asphalt getting cracked and scratched. I just layed out 12k for a new surface to have to clear snow off of and I was worried about marring it with chains and the wrath of the Mrs it would bring if I did it. I finally went with standard double link tire chains (no v-bars)  on the stock 520-H turf tires. they do work ok but will leave marks if not watching out for wheel spin. Nothing the first coat of driveway sealer won't cover tho. My ultimate goal is ag tires with a set of the rubber chains like @Ed Kennell's and lots of rear weight once I get around to my 2 stage beast project.

 

BTW nice clean lookin tractor Joel:handgestures-thumbupright:

20161203_163125[1].jpg

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I run ag tires with no chains on all of my tractors except, my blower tractors. Like most of yous I run extra weight on the back plus 75 lb wheel weights on my blower tractors. I find I have far less tire spin on my blower tractor with the chains on, they hardly spin at all, with out the chains is a whole different story. Now when plowing snow you get a lot of wheel spin and a lot more scratches on the pavement.

 

the other year we had a big snow and the 520 with the 2 stage blower on, was acting up and not running right, so I went and got the 520 with the single stage blower on and ag tires with out chains, it was absolutely helpless with out the chains, got made at it and parked it and got the 2 stage back out, luckily it ran ok after that and cleared a lot of snow that day. that spring I bought new 4 link chains and put on and haven't looked back. It did a good job last year in the one big snow we had except it clogged up in the wet snow at the road to much and put it away and got out the 2 stage again had hardly plugged up at all. 

 

 

So my recommendation would be for the blower to run chains on either ag tires or the Carlisle all trails. for a plow tractor ag tires or all trails. forgot to mention you said you have fairly flat ground so that also makes the ag tires work better on blacktop, good luck 

 

 

 

 

eric j 

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Very nice tractors, all. I came up with the ultimate fix for handling snow 3 years ago, I moved south from Indiana to Alabama. Works really well. :) 

 

Kidding aside, really nice set ups folks. Once in awhile I actually miss firing up the plow truck and old Ariens 26" at the farm

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I have a short piece of 4" channel with a flat plate welded to the open side on top of the transmission. There three  1 1/2" x 1/8"  one each side under the shiftier plate and one across under the front fender and gas tank support with short pieces of 2" channel standing up right at each gas tank bolt. I also used the plate on the 4" channel to help support the 2" receiver hitch.

 

SAM_0636.jpg

Edited by Lee1977
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What about an ATV tire in a 23x10-12?  Looks like this could be pretty serious in the snow:

 

 

11-7-2017 2-03-47 PM.png

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Bring on Old Man Winter Farmer Alex Said ! Go Ag's or Shorts , cut off shirt & Cowman Boots like Big Red Fred sissy's :ROTF:IMG_05201.jpg.2aa9476f7be4e74c88e76ccbb0c85c0e.jpg

Spoiler
Spoiler

 

 

 

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Don't mind to ol BRF  Joel ...me thinks he is long on money but short on brains... just :ychain: BRF.

All kidding aside those actually those at tires don't look half bad but they will skid on ice same as any other tire without some kind of stickment  to the earth. Broader flater tires providing more contact will provide most traction. ATV tires may look boss but are designed to have more traction on the sidewalls in dirt that most of our horses see.  Chains & weight are the answer and doesn't matter if it's turfs, ags  or what ever thread you chose. It really depends on what else you have use for the tractor for. You mentioned it's only or main duty is to blow snow on black top on flat ground  then I would just stick to turfs and a set of rubber chains & some weight and you will do fine. That way summer work you can still run over lawn without leaving turn marks or ripping up sod. 

Edited by WHX12
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BTW how well your blower is tuned up will have a big impact on traction performance.....good luck! :handgestures-thumbupright:

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These are 'Rubber Tire Chains" and work very well on asphalt, with weight in the tire . . . . fronts are weighted also (Rim Guard, molasses).

IMG_0032 copy.JPG

 

Note:  smaller tires with less contact on the ground will provide the most traction.  Tires with more 'Pounds per Square Inch' can dig-down and grip the ground;  a smaller footprint concentrates the weight on a smaller area,  a big larger tire footprint spreads the weight over a larger area and almost sits on top the snow or ice

For Summer mowing you want a large-wider-lighter-flater tire to ride on and not dig in the grass  (tire pressure: 20psi in Winter, 8–10psi in Summer).

 

Edited by GlenPettit
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The wider the tire, the less traction you will have. Ever seen a VW bug go thru snow? I would stay with stock tires and go the rubber chain route. 

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Well the sensible/frugal side of me won out and I ordered a set of the rubber tire chains for the stock turfs.  I really wanted an excuse to order those grim reapers though!  Maybe next year. :text-lol: 

thanks for the suggestions everyone!

Edited by JoeliusZ28

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I think you will be pleased with the traction the rubber chains provide.   Did you order the 2 or 4 link?   The 4 link has a rougher ride than the 2 link when running on cleared pavement.    Just a couple points, as  Lynnmore stated above, the rubber straps will not offer any resistance to side to side slipping. This was never a problem for me as I only travel straight up and down the areas I plow.     Another point was made above to deflate the tire and reinflate after the chains are installed to make them tight.

I really believe the rubber straps work better when they are loose or just snug with a tightener.   As the tire starts to spin, the leading edge of the strap twists coming away from the tire creating a paddle effect similar to a pulling tire that really increases the traction.  

 

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Thanks for the info.  the website didn't offer an option as far as 2 or 4 link, but I believe they are a 4-link set judging from the picture.  I didn't even notice one of the sets that was posted here was a 2 link until you pointed it out.

Edited by JoeliusZ28
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Good point about side slip with any chains , rubber or steel they will do the same with the standard cross-the-tread design - if you get into a slick spot on a hill they will slide sideways . I'd prefer the Euro or diamond pattern in the steel type if I could find them to fit the common Horse tire sizes .

https://www.tirechain.com/Tire-Chains-Studded-Tractor.htm

 

Sarge

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They are made by an Amish family in PA, and they only offer four-link, but you can purchase 20 more individual links (strap, 2-U clips, & 2 sets of nuts) to install between the straps to get this 2-link, ––– and 2-link is much much smoother than just 4-link.  After only 4 hours of use last Winter (Snowblower), there is barely any visible wear on the rubber, at this rate, I'm sure I'll get 10-15 years use out of this rubber-chain.  

I also ran a large o-ring with many clips on both sides to keep the chain taunght (tight/snug).    Remember:  weight, weight, weight –– is everything.

 

For hills, metal diamond-chain is the absolute best,  some ATV chain dealers do have a very open diamond-chain, but not nearly as heavy-duty or dense as what 'Sarge' posted (wonder what that chain costs).

Glen

 

Edited by GlenPettit
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                                                                               :text-yeahthat:

  And to increase the life the "chains" can be swapped left to right and turned inside out to distribute the wear on all four corners of the straps.

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