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On 11/2/2017 at 4:24 PM, UncleJerm76 said:

I moved on to replacing the boot and lift cable (thanks to @wheelhorseman for a great cable!). Now I’m wondering if I have the wrong transaxle or wrong hood stand assembly because the shift boot doesn’t line up with the hole at all and the lift cable does not have a straight shot and is rubbing heavily on the boot. 

 

How can I determine either of those are incorrect for a 701. Does the trans have an id anywhere on it?

My shift boot does not line up either. Not a problem. All 4 speeds are the same as far as the casting in the area of the shifter. The hood stand that you have appears to be correct for the 701. You have to remember that the 701 was kind of a prototype. That's what make it so unique and collectible. Lots of changes were made in years to follow. 

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2 hours ago, Zeek said:

 Mine does not have the primer lever.

 

Its the pin that the long arm that goes to the camshaft pivots on, not the primer arm. The pin on mine moves with the long arm but I don’t know if it’s supposed to or not, seems like it would always leak if that’s the case.

Edited by UncleJerm76

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Today I made a new bracket and tacked a couple nuts to the back of it. This is for the coil and condenser — to shift them to left in order to keep the spark plug wire from rubbing the carb. The way it used to be the thing was wedged under the carb, it always bothered me, even made putting the hood on/off a pain.

 

Once moved left all the coil wires were now too long so I rotated the coil so the + was on the left and condenser and - was on the right. Much better now, no more interference with anything and the hood has tons of room now too. B)

 

(...Yes I’m saving all the original parts I’ve been removing in case I ever want to restore it. :handgestures-thumbupright: )

 

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 @Chris G sent me this awesome 753 belt guard! No more worrying about my 2yr olds shoe laces getting caught in the belt pulley when she rides on my lap!!! :thanks:

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Discovered I had no brake shoe left what so ever. But the thing stops on a dime - ...seriously it has some of the best brakes I’ve ever had. Well I found out a PO rigged up his own brakes, and it’s pretty genius if you ask me. He riveted a small piece of tire tread to a bracket and attached it to the driven belt pulley (see pic). So when you push the clutch in all the way the belt rubs on the tire and it stops... and I mean stops good. I’ll prob replace the brake shoe eventually and leave this on as a reminder. Love finding these little fixes the PO’s did, just wish I knew the stories behind them.

 

...some other homemade things I’ve found include a welded on trailer hitch, bass boat seat, aluminum dash panel, rubber-stopper on the primary engine shaft?, engine cooling louvres in the grill, John Deere 110 rear inside wheels, whole slew of carb gaskets wired to the throttle cable, x-tra angle braces from the trans to the frame. Shifter-boot made from a steering rack boot and a fuel line clamp holding on the secondary double pulley. :handgestures-thumbupright:

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Glad you were able to use the belt guard. I'll still keep my eye out for a proper 701 belt guard for ya.

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Ingenious, but I'm concerned about using a toothed belt for the drive. It should be a fabric covered, non-toothed belt to allow for smooth clutching. Parts are available to rebuild the brake the way Wheel Horse intended. My thoughts are that since he didn't have a belt cover, the belt never stopped, causing grinding when trying to engage the transmission. This device only stopped the belt and really didn't provide much in the way of true braking. 

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2 hours ago, rmaynard said:

Ingenious, but I'm concerned about using a toothed belt for the drive. It should be a fabric covered, non-toothed belt to allow for smooth clutching. Parts are available to rebuild the brake the way Wheel Horse intended. My thoughts are that since he didn't have a belt cover, the belt never stopped, causing grinding when trying to engage the transmission. This device only stopped the belt and really didn't provide much in the way of true braking. 

 

I’ll need to post a video one day to demonstrate how well it stops, it’s amazing. When the petal is depressed the top piece of rubber comes down and pushes the belt against the pulley, then as the pulley moves forward and down it comes in contact with the second (lower) piece of rubber that’s stationary & attached to the petal return spring bracket. Somehow the whole contraption keeps pressure off the engine shaft pulley but keeps belt tight around trans pulley.

 

...You are the second person to mention about the fabric belts, it must make a big difference?

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Installed new choke and locking throttle cables. In its previous life the old cables rested against the muffler melting them to a goo from another planet ...and the new cables wanted to do the same so I made three cable clamps from some thin metal and bolted them to the motor to keep the fuel line/cables/wires from flopping around. Also installed header wrap to help contain some of that heat near so many wires/cables.

 

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Edited by UncleJerm76
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Installed new hitch, drawbar & pin from @Jake Kuhn, thank you sir. Sometime in its previous life the old hitch was welded on with a funky support that winded all the way into the toolbox where the other end was also welded to the seat spring in the toolbox. That was fun getting off. I think someone just welded whatever pieces of metal were within arms reach. Here’s a before and after.

 

 

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