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Hello,

     I like to use Valspar Enamel and I never usually have to add a clear. So I see a few products-(enamels) for clear-coating. Rustoleom, Valspar, not sure which yet? I tried a small gas cap painted with Valspar IHR and a Krylon Clear-coat, excellent for about a minute, then crinkles! "Good thing that I waited and didn't shoot the hood"! I would like to avoid experimenting so any suggestions on a good clear-coat?

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Krylon is more like lacquer than enamel, and will act just like lacquer thinner on your newly painted cap. If you want to clear coat enamel, use an enamel clear coat.

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I seen a lot of different paint recommendations, not too many clear-coats. Go figure, enamel for an enamel! I thought one type could coat the other but not vice/versa? Best to just do it correctly......:)

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Lacquer can be clear-coated with enamel (though I can't figure why anyone would want to do that)! You will have problems if you do it the other way around.

It is always best to use the same brand and type of material from primer to top coat and follow all recommendations. Open time between coats is a major problem for many finishes, the volatile solvents need time to be released and not too much time where the additional coats will not adhere.

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Once the enamel is fully cured (at least 30 to 60 days) you could spray Krylon on it and it should be okay. Best bet though would be to use same brand and type to clear coat.

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I don't think lacquer based paints are even legal anymore to sell. at least not around here. About 15 yrs. ago we had to dispose of all lacquer paint. Couldn't sell them anymore due to VOC laws. 

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That's all well and good except, I can't find any Valspar clear enamel or otherwise? I thought that I use Rustoleom clear on IHR before? Long time has passed since then.......

Thanks again.

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Here is a post you should take the time to read. Post 100 to 107 are of particular interest. @Johndeereelfman had been doing some great work and using products that are worth looking into.

 

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I can not acquire that brand of paint. I have been using Valspar and Rustoleom  for decades and it works great. I really never had the need to clear-coat and forget which brand I used for the enamels..... More than like the Rustoleom as no clear in Valspar is around? Rustoleom Sunrise Red is good product too. I buy paint by the gallon and make good use of my sprayers........Nice job he does on laying down the paint though! Needed a break from the "green".

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17 minutes ago, Oldman said:

paint by the gallon and make good use of my sprayers

Well all right! You can obtain a superior job by adding catalyst hardener. It will lay down smoother, cure faster and provide a stronger finish.

Catalyst Hardener contains a catalytic agent to enhance the physical properties of your selected paint. This catalyst hardener can accelerate drying time up to 40 percent, increase finish hardness up to 30 percent, and increase gloss up to 10 percent

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Yes, on all my enamel, I add hardener. I know a (pint per gallon) has kept me satisfied pretty well thus-far! Of coarse on say, a half cup in my sprayer add 1-cap or less and it usually works out excellent.......I can't save the left-overs, so I find stuff to spray......."everything is Red", ha ha ha!

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I used Valspar "cut ruby" red on my D-250 over a year ago. the paint went down nice and it looks rich even a year later and no clear coat. I will be doing my 211-5 next and I just picked up the paint last week.

fm31.JPG

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https://www.menards.com/main/paint/spray-paint/automotive-spray-paint/rust-oleum-reg-automotive-protective-clear-gloss-enamel-spray-12-oz/p-1444452971013.htm

 

they also make a grade called 2x that works great. I spray the satin or semi gloss for a few coats to bury the color coat, then lightly sand with 1200 grit and then shoot clear gloss, let it flash for a half hour, and hit it again. As near to perfect results as I have found.http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Painter-s-Touch-2X-12-oz-Gloss-Clear-General-Purpose-Spray-Paint-249117/100670438

 

BTW, the reason I use satin for the first coats is that it dries very fast and will not sag under most conditions. The gloss finish coat dries slower, but that is how the high gloss and smooth finish happens

 

 If you want to experiment, Rustoleum can be sprayed as a color coat and finished with clear as soon as it flashes off. I talked with engineers from the company and they told me this...

 

 Anyway. here are the results of Clear gloss 2x painter's touch from a rattle can bought on sale for 3 bucks. Right out of the can and cured for one day with no buffing at all

018.jpg

Edited by ohiofarmer
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17 hours ago, Oldman said:

Yes, on all my enamel, I add hardener. I know a (pint per gallon) has kept me satisfied pretty well thus-far! Of coarse on say, a half cup in my sprayer add 1-cap or less and it usually works out excellent.......I can't save the left-overs, so I find stuff to spray......."everything is Red", ha ha ha!

 

 I do not like to argue about which paint and such is "best" because everyone's skill can vary. There is no doubt that catalyst makes the paint lay down nicer and dry quicker.

The clear coat I have tried so far does the same, but may not be as durable as the hardener stuff i have used before.

 

 The reason I am not using catalyst any more is that I have noticed i am not tolerating it the same as I used to even when using an activated charcoal mask. I do not think I would even consider using it without outside pressurized air feeding the mask.. Here is a simple discussion by guys like us with different opinions like we are likely to have.http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/build-yourself/113852-enamel-hardener-paint-safety.html

 

 I am not telling anyone what to do and which products to use, but at least the info supplied is a place to start your own research into additional safety precautions you can take whether or not you continue to use the isocyanurates.  Truck bed liner and the agri-guard i love to use on the underside of mower decks contain the stuff, so even when brushing those products, I stay down wind.

 

 Stay safe guys, Take the time to read the link [repeated here] http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/build-yourself/113852-enamel-hardener-paint-safety.html

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2 hours ago, ohiofarmer said:

 I am not telling anyone what to do and which products to use, but at least the info supplied is a place to start your own research into additional safety precautions you can take whether or not you continue to use the isocyanurates.

:text-bravo:Excellent point and I apologize for not having included a safety concern.  This was a good post you added and well worth repeating. Your respirator has to have cartridges made for the product you are using and a dust mask isn't a respirator!   :thanks:

http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/build-yourself/113852-enamel-hardener-paint-safety.html

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Absolutely wear a good respirator!  I may be out of date now but in the 1980s I wore an activated charcoal respirator.  May be better today, but don't fool around with the hardeners without a great respirator!

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Ah, I never get into a sealed room or booth with any fumes, period. I have painted commercially and had to use all hazmat. I do my painting under the sun on calm warm days, no rush. I just finished applying Rustoleom Sunrise Red over the IHR and wet sand 400. I can then apply Rustoleom Clear, or another Red, haven't decided yet? Very compatible paints when dry.

IMG_2044.JPG

"Excellent Results"........

IMG_2028.JPG

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If you are using aklyd catalyst hardeners , acetone , ketone and other similar chemicals a full organic purple filter is required - even when mixing and spraying outdoors . I wear my 200 series  MSA Advanced respirator during the whole process of mixing and painting - even with Rustoleum . Cartridges are changed on a regular basis - they are not that expensive if you shop around . I would prefer to wear a full PAPR (Powered Air Purifying Respirator) but with my eye prescription the lens inserts cost around $400 alone - not to mention batteries and filters . It's also worth noting that PAPR's can be rendered useless if they are directly hit with sprayed vapors - one thing a lot of people overlook - it's mentioned in the hazards sheets that come with the unit - read it . Best case is to use a specific built supplied air system that can be located well outside the hazard area - that's not easy as exhausted fumes can be sucked into the air intake for the pressure system . In my opinion , you minimize the hazards as much as you can and work outdoors on windless days - doing it inside enhances the risk factor so high most of us could never afford to properly address the engineering control measures required to deal with this stuff properly . The nearly 20yrs working in my industry has taken it's toll - I currently have 4 areas that are growing cancerous spots that have to be monitored - I'm well done working any HAZMAT jobs as a result .

 

One thing most never consider is wearing a Tyvek suit - aeromatic solvents can be absorbed through skin easily and attach the central nervous system - not something to mess with . Using a half mask respirator still leaves the eyes and facial/neck skin exposed which can directly affect the central nervous system even faster than the rest of the body .

OSHA 29CFR has more information on this stuff than most folks can stand to read - in my Union and the types of work we cover , we are required to be fully educated about all the rules and rights as a worker in the industry - our HAZMAT class used to be 80hrs to certify with full suit testing , which was not fun when I worked on a Superfund site . In all honesty , even a PAPR is not enough to work with this stuff outdoors - you take a risk no matter how you look at it - it's the engineering controls that mitigate that risk as much as possible that count .

 

Start reading here -

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/isocyanates/index.html

 

The real meat of things - so to speak -

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/isocyanates/hazards.html

 

The hazards and risks of working with these types of chemicals can be argued until the end of humanity - my best advice is to read up on what you're working with and take the recommended precautions seriously - it's your health and life and worth you're time . This stuff is no joke , I hate watching our Retirees slowly dying from the hours they worked at various jobs over the years - most of us last less than 5yrs after retirement . The industries that work with various chemicals and such only learn about exposure risks over time - those before us that died as a result of a lack of understanding the hazards paid the price for us to have the tools necessary to protect ourselves , please use them .

 

 

 

Sarge

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.I guess after reading up on the hazards for the first time in 30yrs, perhaps I am taking a huge gamble as this painting gets all over my hands and other skin areas. I used to wear the  full suit years and years ago, when painting for production. One never realizes the true risks involved to make a Tractor shiny and Red?

 

Edited by Oldman

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None of the Valspar products are what they used to be since being bought out by Sherwin-Williams . That's what led to the demise of the Restoration series paints , which were excellent for their cost . You'd almost have to call the tech line and ask if it will work on an oil based enamel - good luck getting a straight answer as none of them want the liability now . Oil based enamels to my knowledge are not designed to be used with clear coats - you can polish the stuff after it's hardened to enhance the gloss if you want , just make certain it's fully cured out after a few months .

 

Sarge

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That answered that question. Thank you, Sarge. I am hesitant to even finish the hood right about now! Truly must take better precautions.......

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Btw - I have been using the common aklyd enamel hardener with oil based enamels for quite a few years from TSC . It used to be branded Valspar but now is branded Majic - I'll find out how well it works today as it's getting mixed with Rustoleum IH red for my trailer on the color coat over their Rusty Metal Primer (heavy red oxide) if it's dry enough . Going to do a test patch first on a spare piece of metal - see if it boils or not first as I sure don't want to have to blast and repaint this dumb thing again . I get the feeling it won't be long and we won't be able to buy the enamel hardeners without a commercial permit or own a shop - a lot of the auto body suppliers and parts stores are really getting picky about letting the stuff go out the door due to it's hazards trying to spray it .

 

Today the humidity is super low , winds are suppose to be 5mph - so I'll be out there in a Tyvek suit with respirator , face shield , goggles , rubber gloves and probably look like some kind of nut sweating to death...lol . If you're going to use these chemicals , read up on protective equipment required - it's an eye-opener and shouldn't be taken lightly .

 

Sarge

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A picture would speak volumes! Neighbors think your working with bio-hazards! I have a new suit still in the package, if I can find it , that is! Really need to stop exposing myself to these chemicals.......I mixed three enamels on this hood, ending in clear, and I'm done. Before I go overboard and get crinkles!

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Maybe I'll have the wife grab a pic later this morning after it warms up - shooting the rest of it today if the wind stays down .

Primer is Rustoleum Rusty Metal (red oxide type) with hot reducer added to slow it down a bit . Top coat is Ace Rust Stop IH Red - using the hot reducer for better flow out and aklyd enamel hardener .

 

59b53a12b78de_20170909_1839241.jpg.b0fd21e8a85014e4393dd873a3727f58.jpg

 

59b53a4753050_20170909_1839331.jpg.4e4330848c19063ec34620804fe58221.jpg

 

Sarge

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laying down color now, looks good, making me want to fix up mine now!

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