Straight From the Horse's Mouth - The final chapter

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Mastiffman

Using thick paper gasket for intake?

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Anyone ever try using the thick paper gasket for the intake instead of the Onan gaskets?

 Just to see if it could work in a pinch? Or temporarily... 

AC

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I've done it many times - in fact I make most of my gaskets. One thing that helped me get doing this was when trying to find a gasket to look it up and read "NLA" (no longer available) Which is becoming more and more common seems for our horses...

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I also make my own gaskets, always worked for me!

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On parts that can change shape with heat - like an intake pipe I'd go with 3/32" material . On heavy machined parts I try to keep those down to 1/32" or 1/16" max thickness . Learn to use the hammer method or a very fine marking pen/pencil and an X-acto knife - good 'ol #11 blades....

Most auto parts stores stock rolls of different material - the dark charcoal colored fiber version is quite good for all around use except exhaust stuff .

 

Sarge

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Heh, I have a few "Cheerios" gaskets on my stuff:lol: Really, cereal boxes or similar will make a nice gasket!.

 

Since we are on this topic gentlemen, I have a question re the material - I bought a roll - somewhere? - and I did not like the material. It was somewhat thick 1/16-1/32"? maybe but it was ---- crumbly? Using the 'hammer' method it would sorta crumble at the edges and if I had an area where the gasket needed to be across a thin area it would actually break, needless to say I discarded that stuff pretty quickly.

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Nice! Thanks fellas. Glad my thinking of this was out of the ordinary. The hammer method? Speaking about hammering a razor through the line to cut the paper and keep doing that to make the shape? Or am I WAY off? lol

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The hammer method? Well, I sat here and just couldnt think of a way to write a description, so I went to you tube and found this --- I would add to the method that I will do bolt holes the first thing and put a bolt in each one, the head of the bolt pressing down on the paper really helps in keeping every thing in place. I also like to use a really small ball peen hammer (I call it my gasket hammer) being small helps when you have small bolt holes or a tight corner to cut. Of course I have a exacto knife and small scissors handy to also give an assist sometimes.

 

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That video is fine , but be cautious about using that much force on a lot of parts - many castings will snap a corner off easily . A simple ball peen with a small head and small diameter tapered ball end will do nearly any bolt hole more than enough to see the line by just rubbing the hammer across the edges . On bolt holes , I just push down on the tapered ball end and swing the handle back and forth to imprint the shape . A cheap set of hole punches works excellent for nice , crisp holes - it all depends on how much the openings have a radius cut in them . Same with outside/inside edges on larger shapes - you can rub the flatter end of the hammer across those edges and it will easily imprint the shape on the material without the risk of breaking a part .

 

Sarge

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i have been having my mom (really crafty woman lol) make my own gaskets for my cast iron briggs for intake. i have bought ones from briggs and they are so thin they just get sucked in and ruined. but i have had her make gaskets for otherthings too. some kohler intakes too

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I still have a sheet of gasket material that parts stores used to sell and its probably over 40 years old along with a sheet of cork gasket material. These are saved for those special needs that seem to come up once in a while.

 

I generally take a piece of paper and put a very light even coat of grease on the casting and then put the paper over it and then pull off. Once this is done I transfer the paper to the gasket and the grease is transferred to the gasket material and then simply cut the gasket. Or, if you have a can of blue simply spray the casting and press and release the gasket material and the blue will mark the gasket material.

Edited by 6bg6ga

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On ‎8‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 8:52 AM, pacer said:

Heh, I have a few "Cheerios" gaskets on my stuff:lol: Really, cereal boxes or similar will make a nice gasket!.

 

Since we are on this topic gentlemen, I have a question re the material - I bought a roll - somewhere? - and I did not like the material. It was somewhat thick 1/16-1/32"? maybe but it was ---- crumbly? Using the 'hammer' method it would sorta crumble at the edges and if I had an area where the gasket needed to be across a thin area it would actually break, needless to say I discarded that stuff pretty quickly.

It sounds like cork gasket material. I've never used it.

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What is the best material for making exhaust gaskets and where can I pick some of this up... 

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I havent tried making an exhaust gasket because of the material needed -- so far, with a little digging I have been able to get 'sto-bought' gaskets and so have never looked into a material that could be used in high heat situations.

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Okay so this stuff should be good to use for exhaust gaskets... 

 

Amazing how much you can save with DIY. Buying premade gaskets from anyone is normally ridiculous. You pay 50% of the price of a sheet for one gasket and you can make 40-50 out of this one sheet. 

 

It's Fel-Pro 3009 12"x 28.5" x .0469 (3/64th)... sold at Pepboys. 

 

20171020_203256.jpg

 

Edited by Mastiffman
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Be prepared for a fight - that stuff does not cut easily nor cleanly . I recommend using a jig saw with a very fine blade and take your time - I've had to make a few over the years and it was a real pita at best . The equipment used to stamp those must be some very high strength steel cutters and I doubt they last very long .

 

Sarge

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Harbor Freight sells  a 6pc hole punch set for $ 6. And a larger set for $12. For the hobbies the the 6pc set is great.for the majority of gaskets

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I just traced the old gasket on to it with a sharpie. 

 

Then I cut a square around it out of the large sheet using tin snips. Then just cut nice and clean around the outside. I used a couple of old sockets for banging out the holes and then used a sanding drum on a drill for the large center hole. Worked perfect. 

 I will look into those punches though. Thanks!

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I've tried those hole punches from HF - they are pretty soft steel and will dull easily . You could heat treat them a bit by heating until dark orange and water quench them - then re-sharpen . The sanding drum is a great idea to get better control to make the final sizing of the center hole . I usually run the jig saw in the vise , upside-down with the trigger locked and a very fine scroll blade - works good but they do need some sanding to clean up the cut areas . The heavier automotive engine header material is the worst to work with - the stuff is pretty thick and will dull almost anything you try to cut it with .

 

Where did you find the Fel-Ramic 3009 material ? None of the local suppliers around here will stock or even order it , some claimed it was NLA....?

 

Sarge

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Good tips fellas. I did grab that HF punch kit today and maybe I will heat treat it first. Quench in water or oil? or oil and fire? ;) (Conan)

Yeah the drum sander on a drill with high speed was awesome it worked perfect and was a nice and clean fit. Might even be able to take an old drill bit and fit a piece of sand paper to that with some tape at the top and bottom and use that for the small holes if needed. I didn't but that is an idea off the top of my head that I'm sure wold work. 

 I called around and found it at Pepboys, of all places. it was $8! I could make 40-50 of these exhaust gaskets with it. It's like 12" by 28..5"... They had it so if you like/prefer it, find it snag as much as you can. But you can get it online for sure too with a bit of a google. 

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I did a search on it again , the problem is no one around here wants to stock it - like everything else . I will get a couple sheets ordered as I work on a lot of old stuff that should be left for dead honestly - but I do like that material and it never seems to burn out like some of the others .

 

One of my favorite tools for doing very small work is a Dremel , but for anything that requires some power I use an old Ryobi that I swear has twice the guts of any Dremel ever made - especially on carbide bits . They do make a few different sizes of sanding drums for those as well as various stones that would work to clean up bolt holes - I've used that in the past when making gaskets from the much heavier Fel-Pro material for headers . Had to do some refitting on a Remflex gasket for the old Land Cruiser and it's custom tri-y header - that thing was a real pain to install and get it to seal properly .

 

Water quench will give you a quickly hardened surface , but be careful how far you heat that steel . Do some research on YouTube first - it will help you understand how far to go on color and it's a good idea to practice on some scrap first that's the same thickness . There are hardening powders out there like Cherry Red , but it's expensive and can have odd results if the steel wasn't mixed right to start with , as much of the Chinese stuff can be unpredictable .

 

Sarge

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Okay, thanks! 

 

 Will Do. I gotta tell ya, it's the little things like this that Always makes me feel that I'm being looked out for by the Boss! Love it. 

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